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Full text of "Family Computing Magazine Issue 45"

CANADIAN, 
$3.50 




UBLISHED BY ^P SCHOLASTIC INC. 



MAY 1987 




VOLUME 5 
NUMBER 5 



The Used Computer Market 

Selling Yourself; Resumes and Cover Letters 

Spreadsheets: Numbers Made Easy 

Handling Your Finances hy Phone: 
The Latest in Home Banking 

Printers for Every Purpose 
From $300 to $1000 



ORIGINAL PROGRAMS FOR ADAM. APPLE II SERIES 
& MACINTOSH. ATARI 400, 800, 600/800XL & 130 XE. 
COMMODORE 64/128 & VIC 20, IBM PC & COMPATIBLES, 
TANDY COCO it MODELS III & 4. TI-99/4A 





.iiBulkShO(i(4ng 




_ir^ss^ 



AT-A-GLANCE I 
SOFTWARE 
REVIEWS , >; 



Apple He/He compatible 



\ -O.-, 











The Laser 128 is a smashing success. 

^^A Clear Winner^ - A+ Magazine 
*54 Remarkahfy Compatibley Competent Pevfirmer^ - inCideyMagussme 

^A Better Valued' - Computer Sboppef 

The Laser 128 Apple-compatible computer is a successful hit with its audience. Industry publication 
reviews make it clear - the Laser 128 Is a hot ticket. The Laser 128 is made to grow like an Apple lie, 
designed to go like an Apple tic and priced to go like a Commodore. And, only the Laser 128 has all these 
performance features: 128K RAM, built-in floppy disk drive, serial and parallel printer interfaces, mouse 
interface, modem interface, 80-column text, numeric keypad and an expansion slot. These leading 
features make the Laser 128 a headline performer with a style perfect for home, school or business use. 
Get the Laser 128 performing for you. Call or write for the name of your nearest Laser 128 dealer. 



VIDEO TECHHOLOGYT-^' 
COMPUTERS, MC. . 

400 Anthony Trail. Northbrook, IL 60062-2536 Telephone: 312 272-6760 j 

Apple, Apple lie. and Apple Ac are registeied Irwdemarks ol Apple Cixnputer. Inc. Commodore is a registered trademark of Comniodore Business Machines. Inc. 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 43 



The time: 1400 
hours. Some- 
where in the 
Pacific. Some 
ill-fated coordi- 
nates in World 
War 11. 




eyeball to eye- 
ball action. This time 
around you'll be right in 
the middle of it all. You 
knew it wouldn't be pretty. 
D.,mj!ec«,>„oin't^r>..uton But how tough couM it 
"''i^^/Sa^t/:iX"- be to rescue a downed pilot? 




'ill it be the twin 
40mm Bofors 
_ aircraft 
guns? Or the 5"lead-spewers 
aft? Depth charges ,p^ 
or torpedoes? // 





furward gumirry fkKJlintm Man the 
anti-iiirCiifi turnti- Thty >r owsin^. 



You're at 
the helm, 
command- 
ing the 
greatest con- 
centration of 
; firepower 
ever put in a lightweight 
fighter. The deadly 
Fletcher Class Destroyer. 
You've embarked on the 
Jirst simulation that actually 
•combines the intricate, 
i^large-scale strategy of 
jWargamingwith 
the intensity of 
furious, 



It sure seemed a lot easier 
than shelling islands, escort- 
ing a convoy or hunting subs. 

Or so you 
thought. 
But now 
look what 
you've got. 
Thirteen 
fully-opera- 
tional, ear- 
bursting battle stations to 
worry about, all armed to the 
gills. Not to mention radar. 
Navigation. Sonar. 

And half the Japanese fleet 
crawling up your spine. 

Time to make some tacti- 
cal decisions. 



WU'VE ALWAYS DREAMED OF 
BEAUTIFUL MODELS. Nowyoii can 
pick up an entire assmdl fleet, including 
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Revcll Or win an authentic scrambled 
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are in every box, or write for an entry 
cmipan. No piDvlmse necessary. Suvep- 
.flakes ends June 15, 1987 Official rules 
are available at participating dealers. 



Any choice could be your 
last, so make it good. 
Suddenly, you hear the 
ominous rumble of 
incoming Zeroes, 
^u fire, and send 
one plummeting to 
the sea, trailing a 
plume of smoke. 

On instinct, you in- 
struct the bridge to 
commence evasive maneuvers. 

Even though, by ^ 
experience, you 
know there's no- 
where to run. 



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scenery absolutely breath-taking! 




Scenery Disks now available: 



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See your dealer, SubLOGIC Scenery Disks are available in- 
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name of the dealer nearest you, call 

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Open 7 AM to Q PM Ceniral Time 




CIRCLE READER SERVICE 40 




PUBLISHED BY SCHOLASTIC INC. 



MAY 
1987 




FAMILY 

DUTI 



VOLUME 5 
NUMBER 5 




COVEP STORY 
71 

BUYING OR SELLING A USED 
COMPUTER 

Upgrading to a computer 
with greater speed and 
memory? Whether you're 
buying or selling (or both), 
tapping into the used-com- 
puter market can yield sub- 
stantial cost benefits. Here's 
help finding out what com- 
puters are in demand, plus 
tips on buying through bro- 
kers, stores, and classified 
ads. 

PLUS: USED COMPUTER PRICE 
LIST 

HOME OFFICE 
12 

SELLING YOURSELF 

Give maximum impact to 
client pitch letters, fliers, 
and resumes by designing, 
fine-tuning, and customiz- 
ing them with your comput- 
er. 

PLUS: LASER PRINTING AND TYPE- 
SETTING SERVICES 

PERSONAL FJMAMCE 
16 

A SOUTH CAROLINIAN 
AND HIS NEW YORK BANK 
Streamline money man- 
agement by exchanging fi- 
nancial data between your 
bank and your personal-fi- 
nance software. 



Page 61 



TgLECOMPUTIMC 
IT 

TRAVEL PLANNING'S CLIPPER 
SERVICE 

Use your modem to 
browse and book flights, 
hotels, and rental cars, 

PLUS: ON-LINE TRAVEL INFORMA- 
TION 

LIFESTYLE 



25 

Whether you're abroad at 
a business conference or 
the bullfights, you'll be able 
to say a lot more than ole if 
you study with foreign lan- 
guage software before you 
leave. Choose from the vari- 
ety of programs available, 
set a course of study, and 
minimize /aiof pas on your 
next trip! 

PLUS: FOREIGN LANGUAGE SOFT- 
WARE CHART 

EPWCATIOM 

8 

HOME-SCHOOL 
CONNECTION: 
CLOSING THE GAP 

Your computer and the 
right software can help 
learning-disabled young- 
sters compensate for their 
disabilities and make the 
most of what they learn in 

school. FAMILY COMPUTiNG 

readers tell how they used 
computers to give their chil- 
dren a better chance for the 
future. 

PLUS: RESOURCES FOR PARENTS 

Page 20 




PROGRAMS IM 
THIS ISSUt 
59 

MICROTONES 

Use your Adam, Apple, 
Atari, Commodore, IBM PC 
or compatible, Tandy, or TI 
computer to climb up On 
Top oj Spaghetti, but don't 
sneeze . . . ! * 

62 

GRAPHICS PROGRAM 

Design your own animat- 
ed sequence of facial expres- 
sions with Face Cartoon on 
an Apple, Atari, Commodore, 
IBM PC or compatible, or 
Tandy computer.* 

66 

PRODUCTIVITY PROGRAM 

Micro Phonebook helps 
you manage telephone num- 
bers and addresses of busi- 
ness contacts, family, and 
friends. A data-base pro- 
gram for Apple, Commo- 
dore, and IBM PC and com- 
patible computers.' 

•Sec program for specific computer 
models and hardware requirements. 

MACHINE SPECIFICS 
20 

News, opinions, quotes. 
and rumors from industry 
analysts, plus new products 
from and for Apple, Atari, 
Commodore. IBM and MS- 
DOS. Tandy, and orphaned 
computers. 

SOFTWARE 
34 

CHOOSING AND USING 
COMPUTER SPREADSHEETS 
See how these number- 
crunching tools can help 
you run your business and 
control your finances, and 
learn how to judge the fea- 
tures of a spreadsheet, 

PLUS: SUGGESTED SPREADSHEET 
SOFTWARE 

COVER FHOTOCKAPH BY .JOEL WHITE 



HARDWARE 
31 



<! Edit OutQ 


Format Font 'Stylt Oprs 


Fens Names Help 1 


f^l Kr(-B3- 


0- 1 7 • B4 


Ic^ \vC] fVll 




Famili) Budget 1987 ^ 




1 


ft 


B 


c 


a 


6 


q 


Budget i 




Januani February 


March \ April 


Salanj Income 




t2400.00 


$2400.00 


$2400.00 


$2400 ijO 





BUYER'S GUIDE TO PRINTERS 
Gone are the days of the 
primitive "dotty " printouts; 
today's sophisticated print- 
ers can deliver first-rate 
hard copy at the speed you 
need. This month's Buyer's 
Guide describes what's avail- 
able and lists manufactur- 
ers, prices, and printer fea- 
tures. 

66 

NEW HARDWARE; 
MACINTOSH I! AND 
MACINTOSH SE COMPUTERS 

A FAMILY COMPUTING produCt 

preview details the features 
of these new Macintoshes: 
color, expansion slots, and 
an MS-DOS option. 

PEPARTMENTS 

4 

EDITOR'S NOTE 

6 
LETTERS 

46 

SOFTWARE GUIDE 

Brief descriptions of 24 
new and/or noteworthy pro- 
grams. 

52 

SOFTWARE REVIEWS 

Longer reviews of several 
programs in the Guide. 

ST 

K-POWER 

"Wacky and Zany Hit 
Game Ideas" contest win- 
ners: Software Scoop; letter 
from a reader; and strategy 
and hints for Dejd. Vu and 
Brea Jeers. 

61 

THE PROGRAMMER 

T8 

CLASSIFIEDS 

80 

ADVERTISER INDEX 

FAMILY rOMPLTING (ISSN 073a-60?a) Is pub- 
liihrd nionthK- by Scholastic Inc , 730 Broadway. 
New York. NT 10003, Siibscripnona: In ITie U.S. 
Kill ]XM<^«mlans. \2 L:<t!ihur» for Sl'9.97: outside 
Ilir U.S. add Sfi Isurfafr maLlJ or 32^3.^7 (air- 
mail |. OtIl« Of publication; 35 1 Garwr Kd.. P.O. 
liox 2700. Moiifc*. OH 4fi05l>-2700- SccDOd- 
rliiw. poM-iflf piiLil al Momof. OH 4S05O399B 
and additional ofilcts. msTMASTER: Stnd ad- 
dress CliaFlgcs iind nalltc of undcllvrrcd copies 
to FAMILY COMrLrriNC. no. Box 25 1 J . Bouldflr. 
CO 80302. Printed In U.S. A. CopftriRhi C I9fl7 
Ijv Scholastic Inc. All rlighl.i rcscrtcd. 



EDITOR'S NOTE 

BEING RIGHT AND BEING WRONG 



More years ago than I care to re- 
member, I had a friend named 
Donald who had a recurring dream. 
Donald dreamed that he died and 
went to heaven. In heaven he saw all 
his heroes, including Plato and 
Socrates, Rembrandt and Leonardo. 
Abraham Lincoln and Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, and they all came to him 
and said, "Donald, you were right." 

"And that to me." said Donald, "is 
heaven!" 

Well, (o many of us being right in 
the eyes of our heroes is heaven, and 
we all know that at times being 
wrong can seem like hell. That's the 
way some of us at family coMPirriNG 
feel about something that happened 
with our March issue. 

Our cover story was on IBM com- 
patibles. With the growing interest 
in these machines and the prolifera- 
tion of brands on the market, we 
thought we could help our readers 
by providing guidelines for evaluat- 
ing the numerous models available. 
We still think that's a good idea. But 
we erred in grouping machines into 
broad categories, often described in 
general terms. As a result, we made 
our readers responsible for interpret- 
ing some of our judgments. That 
was especially true in the case of the 
category we labeled "low-cost no 
names," which we said included 
both good buys and models that re- 
quire a cautious eye before buying. 

By failing to evaluate each com- 
puter on its own merits, we also 
were unfair to the industry. John 
Rossi, president of Blue Chip 
Electronics, protested our inclusion 
of his company's product with com- 
puters we cautioned people against 
buying. And he questioned how we 
could call a computer manufactured 
by the Korean auto giant Hyundai a 
"no-name." He was right. 

Good quality computers can be 




bought at reasonable prices at stores 
and via mail order. But some of the 
newer companies to enter the MS- 
DOS arena, like Blue Chip and 
Amstrad, are making it possible for 
the consumer to buy computers at 
retail outlets for prices formerly 
available only through mail order. 
This is a welcome option for those 
people reluctant to order by mail. 

So, yes, we were wrong in our 
grouping — but not in our basic con- 
cept. With the adoption of IBM-com- 
patible computers for consumer use 
growing at its current rate, we'll be 
increasing our coverage of these ma- 
chines. Next month, in our semi-an- 
nual "Buyer's Guide to Computers," 
we're including a section on MS- 
DOS machines. Plans are also un- 
derway to review a number of these 
computers in greater depth. 

We take our responsibility to you 
very seriously and turn with greater 
commitment than ever to providing 
our readers with the information 
they need to make the informed 
and successful buying decisions 
that lead to productive computing 
experiences. 




CLAUDIA COHL 
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 



SCHOLAStlC INC. COBPOBATIl 

Maurice R. Robinson, founder. 1895-1982 

PRESIDENT. CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER. AND CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD: Richard Robinson 

VICE-CHAIRMAK OF THE BOARD EMERmjS; Jack K. Llpperl 

SCHOLASYIC NATIONAL ADVISOMY COUNCILi Dr. Sidney P. Marland. Jr., chairman, former superlniendenl of 
schools and U.S. Commissioner of Educallon • Dr. Gregory Anrlg. president. Educational Testing Service • Elaine 
I3anks. past presldcni. National Association of EIcmcnlar>' School Principals • Michael J. Gucrra. exccullvc dlreclor. 
secondary' schools. National Catholic Educational Association • Dr. Lola Jane May. maihematlcs ronsiilianl. Wln- 
netka, Illinois, public schrwls • Dr. Wilson Riles, former superintendent of public instruction. State Dcp^lrlmcnt of 
Education, California • Dr. Richard Ruopp. presldcni. Bank Street College of Education. New York. New- York • Patsy 
R- Scales. library and media specialist. Greenville (South Carolina) Middle School • Elaine stcinkemej-er. president. 
The National PTA 



.FAMILY 
iOMFlilliJJ 



730 Broadway. New York, NY 10003 

(2121505-3580 

EDrroR.iN.CHiEF- Claudla Cohl 

DESIGN DIHECTOK: VlnCeilt CfiCl 

EDITORIAL 

SENioH EDrroHS: Nick Suillvan, David Hallerman 

MANAGING EotTOK: Charlotte Pierce 

ASSOCIATE EDrrOKr Bemadctle Grey 

coi^- EDfTOH: Stevcn StIllweU 

RESEARCHER: Stephanie Esters 

EDrroRiAi COORDINATOR: Miner\-a Jimenez 

co?jTRiBtjriNG EDrroBS: JaTTies Delson. 

Charles H. Gajeway. Sarah Kortum. 

Tony Morris. Robin Raskin. 

Ixiuls Wallace, Roger Harl. 

Steve Morgenstem 

K.rawER AssisTAOTS- Jeffrey Donahue, 

Gregory Shakar, Sasha Petraske 

ART 

DESIGN ASSOCIATE: Jaines C. Montalbaiio 

DESIGN ASSl.f rANTS: 

Doreen Maddox, Susan Taylor 

TECHNICAL 

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR: Lance Paavola 

MAjiflciNO TECHNICAL EDrTOH; Stcvcn CM. Chen 

TECHNICAL EorroRS; Pasqualc M. CiruIIo, 

Joey Latimer 

ASSISTANT TECHNICAL EurTOK: Stcve Felnstcln 

TECHNICAL AssocnTE: Karen Kane 



PUBLISHIHC 

itJHLisHEH: Stiirrel Eihoades 

COWTHOLLEH; Robert H. Bellone 

HRODUCTioN MANAGER; David J. Langc 

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR: Decdt OlCksOn 

csRCULATioN MANAGER; Steven R. Aster 

PHOMDTION/TRODUCTION COORDINATOR; PatrlCia Neal 

CIRCULATION ASSISTANT: Palrlcia NahiTilas 
ADVERTISING SALES OFFICES 

ASSOCIATE rUBLISHEK; 

Paul W. Relss (212) 505-3585 

ASSOCIATE AD\:ERT1SING DIREtTOR; 

Bruce Gardner (212) 505-358B 

EASTERN ULSTHICT MANAGER: 

Jonathan Wolpert (212) 505-3628 

WTSTERN DISTRICT MANAGER: 

Pamela Taylor 

480 California Ave., Suite 203 

Palo Alto. CA 94306 

(4151 322-1015 

MIDWESTERN DISTRICT MAN.1GER: 

Sharon O'Brien 

400 N. Michigan Ave.. Suite 1 104 

Chicago. IL 60611 

(3 1 2T 467-6888 

SALES SUPPORT MANAGER: 

Susan Pienkos 1212) 505-3586 

ADVERTISING SALES COORDINATOR: 

Terry Bova (2121 505-3630 
SALES SECRETARY; Mark Walter 

TELEMARKETING DIRECTOR: 

Greg Rapport (2121 505-3587 

TELEMARKETING BEI'RESENTATiVE; 

Dan Nasser 1212) 505-3636 

TELEMARKETING REPRESENTATIVE: 

Rosemary Corr (212) 505-3629 



NEED SUSSCRIPTIOH ASSISTAHCET 

P!ea-se send change of address to family" computing. 
P.O. Box 251 1. Boulder. CO 80302. For ol her 
problems, call (8(X)1 525-0643 and please have a copy 
of your canceled check and mailing label handy. 




obody'^ Perfed:... 



Game 


Winner 


Time to Move 


1 


SARGON III 


5 seconds 


2 


SARGON III 


5 seconds 


3 


SARGON III 


15 seconds 


4 


SARGON III 


15 seconds 


5 


SARGON III 


30 seconds 


6 


Chessmaster 


30 seconds 


7 


SARGON III 


3min 


8 


SARGON III 


3min 



YOU CANT WIN THEM ALL. 

We pitted Sargon III, the world 
champion, against the challenger. 
Head to Iiead, with no punches 
pulled. And believe it or not, the 
champ lost one game to the chal- 
lenger. But Sargon III beats 
Chessmaster 2000 almost everj'time. 

Sargon II! is the result of more than 
twent)' one man years of develop- 
ment. Sargon III will play at precisely 
the level of difficulty you desire. Ask 
Sargon III for a hint, take back a move 
j'ou've already made, replay a se- 
quence, change sides, or set up your 
own board for customized learning. 
Sargon III lets you study in detail 
more than 100 great games of histor)' 
or review 45 classic chess problems. 



all on screen. Sargon III :ilso includes 
the largest libraiy of opening moves 
available on any chess program. 

SARGON m iRTUTES CHESS 
HISTORY 

In a tournament sanctioned by the 
U.S. Chess Federation, Sargon III beat 




a master rated 2209. That makes 
S:u-gon III the only microcomputer 
program ever to defeat a player at 
that level. 

Sargon III has no trouble wiping 
Chessmaster 2000 off the globe. 
Someday, maybe a chess playing pro- 
gnun will be able to beat Sargon lii. 
Until then, whicli chess program do 
you want to owi: the world champion 
or the runner-up? 

(Note; Tin; tesi was run on two Apple II com- 
puters, iiach program played once as white and 
once ns black it each \e\d. Send us S5.00 for 
handling, along with a postage paid return en- 
\clope and we'll send you a copy of the moves 
each side played. ) 



Sargon III is available for; Apple 11 series, Apple Macintosh, IBM PC and Commodore 64'128 computers. You can find 

Sargon III at your local retailer or call 1-800-826-0706. Illinois residents call 1-800-826-1 J30, 

Only MasterCard, VISA and American Express accepted for phone orders. 




S O F T W A R 

A dhiisioft Of SfiEwa)(fi? Software 

'^ 1986 spinnaker Software Corp • One Kendall Square • Cambridge, MA 02139 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 3B 



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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 35 
6 FAMILY COMPUTING 



LETTERS 



KEEP GROWING WITH US 

I read with interest your article 
about using a graphics program to 
create pictures. Quality presentation 
graphics are a business plus, wheth- 
er one has a small business or a 
large corporation. However, I believe 
you stopped short on your sugges- 
tions for a quality output when you 
mentioned only color printers or 
hand coloring transparencies. 

You might also have mentioned 
color plotters that produce color 
hard copy and transparencies with 
little effort. When you consider the 
value of the time a business person 
might spend coloring, SI, 300 invest- 
ed in a color plotter doesn't seem ex- 
pensive. I am especially pleased with 
the superior results I get from my 
IBM 6180 eight-pen desktop plotter. 

Just because you are a family 
magazine, you shouldn't sell short 
those of us who have grown with 
you. We still subscribe, though wc 
are no longer novice computer buffs 
and have incorporated our use of 
computers and computer peripherals 
into our business life. Keep growing 

with us, CAI^OL SLA^TkWKER 

New Fairfield. Connecticut 

THANK YOU FOR THE 
INSPIRATION 

I was greatly impressed by your arti- 
cle on handicapped persons using 
computers (see Home-School Con- 
nection, February 1987). 1 wrote 
the sources mentioned and have re- 
ceived a great deal of useful informa- 
tion. It inspired me to convince a 
friend to teach me enough BASIC to 
write my own program for my son 
who has cerebral palsy. My program, 
written for the IBM PCjr, changes 
the color on the screen nine times. It 
increases the one-second decibel 
tone with each color change, and 
then goes backward through the col- 
ors as the tone goes back down the 
scale. I am hoping this will encour- 
age him to use his arms and teach 
him cause and effect in a non- 
threatening way, 

MARY ANN McCONNELL 

Mercer, Pennsylvania 

WHY MUST I BUY A NEW 
MONITOR? 

1 purchased an enhanced Apple lie 
with an Apple RGB monitor less 
than two years ago. I have been look- 
ing into the possibility of upgrading 



to an Apple llGS. This would mean 
spending about S600 for the up- 
grade, and another S350 for the disk 
drive. What I can't understand is 
why Apple has not made its old RGB 
monitor compatible with the new 
computer. 

1 work as a librarian-computer 
specialist in the Tomahawk Elemen- 
tary School in Wisconsin. I also help 
publish a school newspaper. As an 
alternative to a Mac, 1 would like to 
use a lies with some of the new 
desktop-publishing programs. I can't 
afford to buy a whole new monitor. 

We have ah^ws been very happy 
with our Apple computer. However, 
Apple should at least be able to 
make its new computer compatible 
with its former RGB monitors. 

N'ANCY STARK 
TOMAHAWK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Tomahawk, Wisconsin 

EDITOR'S NOTE: There are two types oj 
RGB monitors: digital and analog. 
In order to deliver the improved col- 
or of the new IIgs. Apple had to go 
with an analog RGB monitor: you 
have a digital RGB monitor. Be- 
cause of its analog output, the Hgs 
is not compatible with digital Apple 
RGB monitors, and there is no way 
to convertjrom one to the other. 
It is the analog that produces 
more colors. 



THANKS FOR THE MENTION, 
BUT . . . 

Thanks for the mention of our Dvo- 
rak Developments newsletter in 
your January issue (Letters, page 4). 
I'm sure many of your readers are 
interested in getting information on 
the more efficient, easy-to-learn Dvo- 
rak keyboard layout. Unfortunately, 
the letter as printed contained some 
errors. 

Dvorak Developments costs S12 
per year, not S20. and we moved to 
a new address several months ago. 
We don't want people to be disap- 
pointed if their mail doesn't reach 
us, so we will be glad to send a free 
sample issue of the newsletter to any 
of your readers who send a self-ad- 
dressed envelope with 39 cents post- 
age to our new address: Dvorak De- 
velopments Newsletter. P.O. Box 
1895, Upland, CA 91785. 

RA.N'DY CASSINGHAM 
EDITOR. DVORAK DE\T;L0PMENTS 

Upland. California 



CORRECTIONS 

In February's "Buyer's Guide to 
Hard-Disk Drives" (page 58). a cap- 
tion incorrectly described the Ber- 
noulli 10+10 disk drive. The 10 -I- 
10 has two removable high-density 
floppy disks encased in a hard plas- 
tic shell. Each disk stores 10 mega- 
bytes of data. 

In the March "Buyer's Guide to IBM 
PC-Compatible Computers," we in- 
correctly listed the retail chains that 
carry the Blue Chip Personal Com- 
puter. The chains are Target. Feder- 
ated Group, Fedco, Caldor, Save- 
Mart. and The Wiz. Toys R Us and 
Walmart arc test-marketing the Blue 
Chip PC. 

The IBM PC/XT Compatibles chart in 
the March "Buyer's Guide to IBM 
PC-Compatible Computers" listed 
the incorrect version of MS-DOS in- 
cluded with the Tandy 1000 SX 
computer. MS-DOS 3.2 is the ver- 
sion included with that computer. 

The correct number for Commo- 
dore's customer support service, 
mentioned on page 48 of the March 
■'Guide to Computer Repair," is 
(215)436-4200. 

The correct price for Natural Micro- 
System's Watson telephone answer- 
ing machine listed in April's "Start- 
ing Your Own Home Business" (page 
33) is S498. 

UPDATES 

As of press time, the Blue Chip PC 
(S599) includes MS-DOS 3.2 without 
documentation, announced Linda 
Yogel, spokesperson for Blue Chip 
Electronics, Inc. MS-DOS 3.2 with 
GW-BASIC and full documentation 
costs an additional S99. 

Professional Software's Fleet Sys- 
tem 3 {see the Commodore column 
oj Machine Specifics in the March 
issue, page 30] is now available only 
for Apple II series computers and not 
for the Commodore 1 28. Fleet Sys- 
tem 4 (the latest version available by 
early March this year) will run on 
the 128 and features a 90.000-word 
spelling checker. 



FA-MiL-i' COMPUTING tooks forward to letters 
from all our readers. Please direct your 
correspondence lo: Letters to the Editor. 
FA.\iiLY COMPUTING, 730 Broadtiiay, New 
York. NY 10003. 



Today's Cure for 
the Term Paper Blues 



The term paper... sleepless nights, WDrry-filled di^, and no 
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serious case of the blues, limr computer and J>Brm Paper 
Wiriter'' are the only cure. 

The Notetaker: Helps you collect, ssre, sort and find in- 
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Tbs OntUner: Puts your ideas into subject groups and 
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of yoiir preface. 

The Wtiter: A complete word processor that breaks writer's 
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The FOotnoter & BibUograpty Compiler! No more late- 
night thumbing through style manuals. The Compiler does 
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TBrm Paper VMter, Because making the grade doesnt have to 
be a full-time job. Or give you the blues. 

For Commodore 128, IBM PC, PCjr, 

Tandy 1000 and 100% Compatibles, 

and Apple n Series Computers. 





CIRCLE READER SERVICE 3 



MAY 1987 7 



HOME-SCHOOL CONNECTION 

CLOSING THE GAP 

Learning-Disabled Children and Their Parents Discover 

That Computers Aren't Just for Whiz Kids 



BY BERNADETTE GREY 



"Both of our children were first diag- 
nosed as learning disabled before 
they started kindergarten," says 
Stefan Gierjii. "We were frustrated 
for the next five or six years because 
we wanted to help our kids but we 
didn't know how. We went from one 
parent-teacher conference to another 
and asked 'How can we help? How 
can wc help? What can we do?" The 
special-education teachers told us, 
'Don't worry. If you're frustrated, let 
us handle it.' 

"Well, for some parents that might 
be just (ine and dandy," says Stefan, 
"but wc wanted to take an active role 
in our children's education. We 
wanted the chance to try to help 
them. 

"That's what the computer meant 
to us. It was our chance to try to 
make a difference. And we did." 

LD KIDS FACE 
OVERWHELMING OBSTACLES 

Stefan and Diane GicrjT!. who live 
in Madison, Wisconsin, have a 12- 
year-old daughter. Dawn, and a 9- 
year-old son. Garth, who have learn- 
ing disabilities. According to the 
U,S. Department of Education, the 
Gicryn kids are just two of nearly 
2 million children across the 
country who have some U^pc of 
learning disorder, such as dyslexia 
(a reading disability), dyscalculia (a 
disturbance in the ability to do 
mathematics), or dysgraphia (a dis- 
ability in which handwriting is dis- 
organized). That means that there's 
a national population of students 
twice the enrollment of the New York 
City public school system who strug- 
gle to keep up with their peers be- 
cause they have trouble learning. 

Even parents of gifted children ad- 
mit that at times it's backbreaking 
to convince their kids to read a book 
for fun, write a thank-you letter to 
Grandmother, or complete math 



ItKUNALJKTlE GKEY iS FAMILY CONSPLTINC S 

associate editor. 




dittos. When children are learning 
disabled, parents' efforts to encour- 
age learning can be futile because 
their kids have faced so many de- 
moralizing failures in the past. What 
child can bear to spend two hours 
staring at a multiplication table that 
he or she can't make sense of? And 
it can be equally frustrating for the 
teacher or parent who tries in vain 
to explain why seven times seven 
equals 49 . 

COMPUTERS CAN MAKE 
THE DIFFERENCE 

While many parents of learning- 
disabled children entrust the schools 
with the frustrating task of teach- 
ing, others have vowed to do all thej' 
can at home to close the gap be- 
tween their children's skills and 
those of their peers. The Gicryns 
and a number of other KAiMiLY com- 
puting readers have told us that, 
with the exception of their own de- 
termination, computers have had 
the most positive effect on their chil- 
dren's desire to learn. It's made the 
difference in Dawn and Garth 
Giervn's motivation to learn; it's 



made the difference for Arthur Wag- 
ner, who is learning disabled as the 
result of an accident; and it's made 
the difference for Edy Ray, a 17-year- 
old who reads at about the sixth- 
grade level. 

That may come as a surprise to 
many parents and even some educa- 
tors who are convinced that comput- 
ers should be used only by above- 
average students — tomorrow's scien- 
tists, mathematicians, and MBAs. 
"When my husband first mentioned 
using a computer with the kids, 
that's what I thought," Diane Gieryn 
admits now. "I said, *A computer? 
They're behind the other children. A 
computer will definitely be too com- 
plicated for them.' And I thought, 
Gee whiz, I'd never be able to do 
that.' " 

But like other families, the 
GiervTis gave it a shot. One mother, 
Linda Wagner, of Cicero. Illinois, 
was very skeptical when she first 
bought an Apple lie for her son. Ar- 
thur: "This was it. our big invest- 
ment with no guarantee. I would do 
this for his education. When they 
dropped off 10 boxes, each one with 
a book of directions and instruc- 
tions in a language I'd never heard 
of, I wanted to get my money back. 
My son wanted to turn it on. It took 
three hours to put it together but to 
watch him study the screen and 
practice on the keyboard was great." 

Arthur, who was hit by a 
truck when he was seven years old. 
"changed from a child who looked at 
life in a beautiful way to a child who 
hated waking up in the morning," 
says his mother Linda. "He hated 
school because of the fact he just 
couldn't retain what he read. He 
missed many of the formulas for 
math and the frustration he felt 
from teachers didn't help. This went 
on until seventh grade." 

That's when the Wagners 
bought their Apple He, "In eighth 
grade, Arthur didn't want to miss a 
day of school." says Linda. 



8 FAMILY COMPUTING 



SUPPLEMENT SCHOOL 
LEARNING 

A computer and the right software 
can help learning-disabled children 
make the most of what they are 
taught in school and can help them 
compensate for their disabilities. 

Another family computing reader, 
Vicki Brodic, of Alameda. California, 
says. "I can't begin to tell you how 
much my daughter Edy has accom- 
plished using the computer." in De- 
cember 1985. Vicki and her hus- 
band. Clifford, purchased an Apple 
He with two purposes in mind; to set 
up a home office and to reinforce 
and supplement what their chil- 
dren — particularly Edy, who is learn- 
ing disabled — learn in school. 
"Straight academics just weren't 
helping Edy," says Vicki. 

Seventeen-year-old Edy suffers 
from dysgraphia and dyscalculia, 
and she also has trouble putting 
things in a logical sequence. "Logic 
is hard for her," says Vicki. The 
Brodics have found that it's easier 
for Edy to understand the abstract — 
e,g., time and space — and to "see" 
logic when it's visual. With programs 
like Layer Cake, which help develop 
logic. Edy can learn to compensate 



RESOURCES 

ACLD Newsbrief . published by Assn. for 
Children & Adults with Learning Disabil- 
ities. 4156 Library- Road. Pittsburgh, PA 
15234: (14121341-1515). A bimonthly. 24- 
page newsletter outlining die latest is- 
sues in ihe fleld of learning disabilities. 

Cenler f«i' Ccmpuler Opperiimllles for Ihe Dis- 
abled, a public service of Ihe Boston 
Computer Societ)'. 1 Center Plaza, Bos- 
ton. MA 02108: ([6171 244-76071, The 
learning disabled, physically disabled, 
the developmentally delayed, and their 
parents gel hands-on experience with the 
computer as they explore its uses in over- 
coming and effectively managing the dis- 
ability. There is no fee for the service. 

Diiabled Children's Computer Croup. P.O. 
Box 186. 7230 Fairmount Avenue, El 
Cerrito, CA 94530: (14151 528-DCCGI. 
Operates a public-access computer re- 
source center to help families and profes- 
sionals identify appropriate available 
computer resources. Services are free to 
members who pay S20 annua! dues. 

Parentele. 5338 N. Pennsvlvania Street. 
Indianapolis. IN 46220: ([3'l71 259-1654). 
A national coalition created and operated 
by volunteer parents and friends of those 
with handicaps; publishes a quarterly 
newsletter, Crisscross. 

U.S. DeparfmenI of Iducalion. 400 Mary- 
land Ave. S.W.. Washington, D.C. 20202: 
(12021 245-3192). Publishes an annual re- 
port to Congress on the education of 
learning-disabled children. 





How to Design Your Own T-Shirt in Five Easy Stel)s 




CD 

m 

a 



Available at fine software dealers 




CtRCLE READER SERVICE 39 



Sf^mvfEff 



Get Started 

Tlic firsi tliiiij; lo do is id lioot up T-Shirl Sliop. You'll Ix- gfLTltcf hy 
un easy lo iindcrstnntl nicmi that Ids y<iu stx' cvcniliinj; the program 
can do at ;i glance. You can LOAD pklures from die picture disk. 
DRAW \'our own pictures. lYPE in any slogan you can think o£ and 
COLOR in your pictures. 

Choose a Graphic 

NowclnKise LOAD from die menu Yiiu can choose from more than 
50 supplied graphics. Hollnvmid eclebrilics, political and hisiorie;il 
figures as well as plants and .ininials represent some of die categories 
included. For a change, you can dravs' your own picUire. In eitlier case, 
once ynu choose a picture, the oudine will appear un the screen, 
ready to he colored. 

Paint \\ 

Here's your chance to stion your artistic ahiliiy. I sing the palette of 
colors, Ilie brushes and the sprayeaiis. you can paint a rainfjowof 
color - you can even color in tile picture lo match your eyes! If you 
w.ant. the program vsill aulomatically paint ihe picUire with colors 
you choose. 

.\dd Type 

\ou've got a lu-isucifully colored picture now, Cro lo die TiPI; seciion, 
and choose from a variety of type styles. Name your picmre, or attach 
some absurd sayitijji. Create catchy politicaf slogans, humorous 
sayings, or .something incredibly tackT. 

Print It 

Print your shirt design onto the special iron-on transfer paper (free 
sheets are includetl ), With T-Shirt Shop, what you sec on the screen is 
exactly what you'll get on your t-shirt, llie paper will work 'nidi any 
ribbon -even in color- and will transfer perfectly to any t-shirt. Print 
your design, iron the transfer onto }our shirt and you're in business. 
Impress your friends! Wear them into die office, lo the beach, or to a 
wedding T-shirts make jyeat gifLs, iix)! 

T-Shirt Shop is the only program dist allov\'s you to design, paint and 
create your omi I-shirts, In just mimjics you'll Ik wearing your 
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stt'eal.shirt or e\'en undenvc;ir„.rroni T-Shirt Shop. 

1«R DIREcrr ORDERS ONLY CALL 1.8(M).826-0706, UlinoLs residents 
call 1-8)K(-S26-15?(). Only .Masterc-ard. \'isa and American Express 
accepted for phone orders. .-Vll other inquiries please WTite Spinnaker 
Software, 

T-Shin Shop '" may Ik- usctl with (he following: Primers; .St^RlBE 
IMAGEWkilTH. lM.\(;i;WRIITR II, KPSON l-'X-Hd, OKIMA'IT. 2(1, 
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Cambridge, ,\IA ((21 .W .Ail rigliLs rcsened. 



HOME-SCHOOL 
CONNECTION 

for her disabilities. Layer Cake has 
helped her rollow and stick with 
things such as schedules, according 
to her mother. "Just yesterday, we 
used AppleWorks to create a sched- 
ule for her day, which included 
eveiTthing: getting up, brushing her 
teeth, getting dressed, catching the 
bus to school. ever\'thing. And she 
followed it just fine." 

And because she can use a word 
processor, Edy now writes letters. 
"Her handwriting is very difficult to 
read, and she knows it." says Vicki. 
"With the computer, she really en- 
joys letter-writing." 

READING, WRITING, 
ARITHMETIC 

"My wife and 1 had to use numerous 
resources and learn new ways of 
teaching our children how to read 
and recognize words." says Stefan. 
"One of the most useful tools we 
have is our computer." 

Software such as Richard Scarry's 
Best Electronic Word Book Ever (Co- 
leco Industries) and family comput- 
ing's own Word Search has helped 
the Gieiyn kids in learning letter 
patterns and word recognition, ac- 
cording to their parents. "I'm happy 
to say that by using the computer, 
both of my children have made bet- 
ter-than-avcrage progress in catch- 
ing up with their delays in speech 
and vocabulary." says Stefan. 

Stefan also claims that fun math 
programs such as The Electronic 
Flash Card Maker (Coleco Indus- 
tries) have helped his son Garth 
boost his math ability up to his ap- 
propriate grade level. 

A BETTER CHANCE 
FOR THE FUTURE 

The Brodies, Wagners, and 
Gicryns all sound like irrepressible 
optimists when they talk about their 
computers. They have plenty of rea- 
sons to bubble. At times, these par- 
ents have pushed themselves and 
their children up against seemingly 
insurmountable educational barri- 
ers. Rather than give up and leave 
all the teaching to the teachers, they 
searched for ways around barriers — 
and found them. Now, instead of ob- 
structions, they see opportunities. 
"Arthur still has a learning disabil- 
ity, but il changes all the time." says 
Linda Wagner. "I know my son will 
have a chance in life, and this 
chance 1 believe came from our com- 
puter. "1£ 



"Ready for an adventurous challenge? 
We're a team. And Nellie 
doesn't horse around ." 



*: % 




CompuServe 



Games 



You never know 
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i To buy your CompuServe Stibsicri|)tton Kit, 
see.your nearest computer dealer. ' 
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(In Ohio, call 614-457-0802) 

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Adinglon Cenfre Blvd. 
.Jibus. OH 43220 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 10 



.\UV 1987 11 



HOME OFFICE 

SELLING YOURSELF 

Use Your Computer to Design and Fine-tune Your 

Resunne, Letterhead, and Cover Letters 



BY ROGER HART 



Got something to sell? Your skills? 
Your services? In the past, you prob- 
ably typed up a resume (or some 
such list of your achievements), took 
it to a type shop, and got 100 or 
more copies printed. You may have 
also printed a form letter or flier de- 
signed to appeal to a multitude of 
potential clients or emploj'-ers. 

That method works fine — except 
that the next time you want to sell 
your sen'ices or look for a job, you'll 
have to go through the whole pro- 
cess again. Similarly, you may find 
that your whole analysis of the job 
market was wrong, leaving you with 
the task of overhauling your resume 
to keep up with it. 

A computer can simplify, speed, 
and enhance the difficult task of 
selling yourself and your ideas. With 
a word-processing program, you can 
constantly update and refine your 
sales pieces and even target them to 
specific companies in the course of 
one "sell." When using a Macintosh, 
Amiga, or ST, or a font-generating 
program on other computers, you 
can quickly design simple but effec- 
tive letterheads. 

If you subscribe to MCI Mail, an 
electronic mail service, you can de- 
velop a list of people who will all re- 
ceive the same letter. It will be laser 
printed on a facsimile of your letter- 
head and also display an exact repli- 
ca of your signature. You can ask for 
four-hour, overnight, or regular de- 
livery. 

All in all, a computer gives you 



Contributing Editor roc,e:r il\rt wrote 
"Desktop Publishing" in the September 
1986 issue. 




more control over the final look of 
your presentation and makes it easi- 
er to change it quickly to keep in 
step with the marketplace and to 
disseminate your materials. 

Here are a few ideas on construct- 
ing a resume and cover letter, plus a 
comprehensive list of firms that will 
laser print or typeset from a disk. 

THE RESUME 

Start by making a list of potential 
employers or clients. Rather than 
just listing companies, try to get the 
name of the person who handles re- 
quests. At large companies, hiring 
for each department is usually han- 
dled by a different person. If your 
word-processing program has a mail- 
merge function, set up the names so 
that you can later merge them onto 
a cover letter. 

When actually creating the resume 
or sales piece, don't go overboard 
with enhancements: use bold for 
your name at the top of the page 
and perhaps for the names of past 
employers or major achievements. 
Alternatively, you might want to tiy 



underlining for a more subtle means 
of making information stand out. 

Whatever you do, don't try to show 
off your computer expertise and the 
many facets of your printer. When in 
doubt, be conservative. Many Macin- 
tosh owners, in particular, get too 
fancy and use too many font variet- 
ies. This can give a resume a flighty, 
unserious look; it's like wearing a 
purple and orange polka-dot bow tie 
or scarf to an interview. 

In general, when organizing your 
resume, you should put the section 
on job experience first, unless you 
arc fresh out of school. List events 
in reverse chronological order — with 
your most recent job listed first. If 
you supervised people, say how 
many. If you were asked to train 
people, put it down. 

Place more emphasis on your job 
experience and less on your educa- 
tion (unless, of course, the job has 
specific degree requirements). Mini- 
mize or even forget personal data; 
the employer is trying to fill a job, 
not find a friend or an interesting 
companion. 



12 FAMILV COMPLtTINC 



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Over 30 fonts ; 
in a variety of sizes 
and styles. 



1 to 10 columns | 
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Over 250 pieces 
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CreditLine 




Multiple pages in a 
single document. 



30 patterns for boxes, 
fill and lines. 



J Vertical, horizontal and 
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Fonts with bold and 
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Fully integrated text 
and artwork. 



"E 



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A surprisingly 

powerful package. 

When you want to produce 

professional looking newsletters, 
flyers and ads, without a lot of 
cost or complication — all you 
really need is your PC, a dot 
matrix printer and NewsMaster. 

For under $100, NewsMaster 
gives you over 250 highly detailed 
graphics, 30 different type fonts, 
lines and boxes of any width. Plus 
versatile text processing capabili- 
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automatic text flow. 

True WYSIWYG 



NewsMaster shows you both art and 
text, exactly the way it will appear 
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'Mimbcnhip h not 

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When we say 

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gpiiii 



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Of course, the real proof is in the 
final printed product. That's where 
you'll really come to love NewsMaster. 
Incredibly imaginative, high density 
graphics and text. And all from your 
dot matrix printer. 
Visit your local computer dealer 
and get your copy of NewsMaster 
today Or call Unison World at 
(415) 848-6666. 

NEWSMASTER IS AVAILABLE 

FOR MS-DOS COMPATIBLE 

COMPUTERS. 



Unison Wortd 

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Suite 902 

Berkeley, California 94704 
(415) 848-6666 

Unison World is a division o( 
Kyocera Unison, Inc. 

NewsMaster is 

a registered trademark of 

Kyocera Unison, Inc. 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 18 



HOME OFFICE 

In short, your resume should pro- 
duce a feeling of accomplishment 
without bragging. After all, you are 
trying to convince the reader to 
grant you an interview. Just remem- 
ber, don't go overboard by listing 
euerything you've ever done. 

Use your word processor to cus- 
tomize your resume for different 
companies. The employment process 
is essentially a negative one. Em- 
ployers often look for reasons to 
throw resumes out. The closer your 
resume is targeted to a specific job, 
the greater the chance it will make it 
through the screening process. 

THE COVER LETTER 

Whether you are sending a resume 



to a prospective employer or a pro- 
posal to a client, you should write a 
cover letter. It serves as an introduc- 
tion to the enclosed material and ex- 
plains why you are sending it. If you 
are applying for a job, include your 
job or career objective in this letter 
and indicate what you can offer the 
company. 

You can design your own letter- 
head on a computer. At least one na- 
tional chain (AlphaGraphics, Tuc- 
son, Arizona; |602| 882-4100) will let 
you come into the store, sit down at 
a Macintosh, and design a letter- 
head, envelopes, and business cards 
using MacDraw. MacWrite. or Mac- 
Paint. Then, you can laser print re- 
producible copies from your disk. 



PRINTING SERVICES 



1 1 1 Apple LaserWriter Printing; 12) Tvpeset- 
tlng; |A| Macintosh disk: [Bl IBM PC & 
comp. disk; IMj Accepts files by modem: 1R| 
Rents computer time. 

Advonceil Cempiiler Craphicf, 1 260 Bo>'ls- 

ton St.. Boston. ^<IA 02215: (617) 437-6470. 
[21. lAl. IBl, I.MI. 

Alphabel Saup, Inc.. 900 North Point St., 
San Francisco, CA 94109; (415) 885-3156. 
Ill, 121, lAj, !B|. IMl. 

AlphaCrapiilts, 845 E. Broadway, Tucson. 
AZ 85719; (602] 882-4100 (other locations]. 
Ill, |2[, |A|. [Ri. [Ml. 

Aptos Post fypograpiiy, 8058 Valencia St. . 
Aptos. CA 95003; (408) 688-7474. |2|. |AI, 
IB]. IMl. 

Cdmpufer Concept. 3954 Calle Buena Vis- 
la, Newburv Park. CA 91320: 1805) 499- 
0583. HI. 121. (Al. IB). 

Copy Ink. 1060 Willow St., San Jose. CA 
95125: (408)275-6933. [11, 12], [A). [R). [M], 

Da Vinci Graphics. 6175 N.W. 57th St.. 
#213. Fort Lauderdale, FL 33319: (305] 
721-0216. 111. [21. [Al. IB), [Ml. 

Design & Type. 739 Bryant St.. San Fran- 
cisco, CA 94 107; (415) 495-8973. 1 1 1. [21, 
lAj. (Bl, [Ml. 

Deskisp, Inc., P.O. Bo.\ 4707. Boulder, CO 
80306; [3031 938-9299. [11. [2]. |A|. |B|, [Ml. 

Desktop Publishing & Design. 96 South St., 
Boston, MA 02H1: 1617) 482-2122. HI, [2|. 
[Al. IB). [Ml. 

Desktop Studios. 89 N. Main St.. Andover. 
MA 01810: (617) 470-3032. |1). [A|. [Bj. [R]. 

Expertype. 44 W. 28th St.. New York. NY 
10001: (212] 532-6222. |1|. |2|, |B[. [Ml. 

C & e Later Typesetfing, 1030 Confiress 
St., Portland. ME 04102: (207) 774-7338. 
HI, [21, jAI. [Rl, [Ml. 

Graphic Arts Associates, 575 Hope St.. 
Stamford. CT 06907; 1203) 348-9197. |2|, 
IBl. [Ml. 

The Imagesetter. Div. of Designer's Eye. 
440 Humphrev St.. SwampscotI, MA 01907; 
1617) 592-1234. [II. |21, |A[, [R|, |M|. 

Intergraphics, 106A So. Columbus St.. Al- 
exandria. VA 22314: (8001 368-3342. |2). 
IBl. [Ml, 

Kinko's. 4141 State St., Suite B. Sanla 
Barbara, CA 93 UO: (800) 292-6640 (In CA] 
and (8001 235-6919; other locations. [1 1. 12), 
[Al, (Rl, IMl. Sen'ices var\' from store to 
store. 



Krishna Copy Center. 2111 University Ave.. 
Berkeley. CA 94704: (415) 540-5959.'[l|. 
[21. [Al. [Bl. [Rl. [Ml. 

Laser Designs Corp., 1430 Massachusetts 
Ave.. Suite 209, CambridfSe. MA 02138; 
(617) 868-0222. |1[. [21, [Al. [B|. |R[. 

Laser Printing Services. 26058 W. 12 Mile 
Rd., Southlield, MI 48034; (313) 356-1004. 
Ill, [2], [A]. [Bl. [Rl. [Ml. 

Laserlype Corporation, 227 E. 45lh St.. 
New York. NY 10017; (212) 949-7413 and 
(201) 495-6640 (In NJ), I U. (21. [Bl. [R[. [Ml. 

MacTography, 702 Twinbrook Parkway, 
RockvlHe, MD 20851: (301)424-3942. [1|. 
[21, [A], |R), IMl. 

MecTypeNet. RO. Box 52188, Livonia, M! 
48152; (313) 477-2733. [1|. [21, [Al, [Bl, [M|. 

OHtceTalk. 345 Montffomcr)' Ave., Bala 
Cvnwyd. PA 19004: (800) 345-0133. [1], [2|. 
[Al. IB], [Ml. 

PageWorfcs, The Garage/3rd Floor. 36 
J.F.K. St., Cambridge, MA 02138; (617) 
868-2943. 1 1 1. [21. (A). [B[, [R[, [Ml. 

Personal Computer Resources. 45 Pond St. . 
Nor^vell, MA 02061; (617)871-5396. Hi, [21, 
[Al. (B[. (Rl. 

Personal Processing Inc., 5 J.F.K., Suite 

306, Harvard Sq.. Cambrldf^e, MA 02138: 
(617)876-7007. HI, [2|. [A|. 

Pipe Creek Publications, Inc.. 533 Lincoln 
Center. 7800 IH-IO West, San Antonio. TX 
78230; (512)349-6061. [1|. |2|, [A[. |B1. [M|. 

ProTypograpfiy, Inc., 361 W, Superior St., 
Chicafio. IL 60610; (312) 266-8973. [1], (21. 
[A], [Bl. [Ml. 

Software Output Services. 12 E. 46(h St.. 
New York. NY 10017: 1212] 697-4450/529- 
3377, HI. [21, lAI. [Bl, [Rl, |M[. 

Southwestern Typographies. 2820 Taylor 
St.. Dallas. TX 75226; (214) 748-0661. [1|, 
121, [Al. [Ml. 

Spectrum Arts LW., 1823 Eulaw Place, Bal- 
limorc. MD 21217: (301)462-6900. HI, |2], 
|A|. [Bl, [M[. 

Typeline. 170 State St.. Teaneck, NJ 
07666; (201) 837-9839. HI. [2|. iA[, IB), |M|. 

Typesetting Service Corp., 50 Clifford St, , 
Providence, RI 02903; (401) 421-2264. HI. 
[21. [Al, [Bl. [Ml. 

U-Design. 201 Ann St., Harlford, CT 
06103: (203) 278-3648. HI. (21. [A]. [R]. [Ml. 

Write Solutions, 4141 State St., Suite D2. 
Santa Barbara, CA 93110: (805) 967-0487. 
HI. 121, lAl, [Rj, 



Ybu may or may not save money 
this way; the chief advantage is that 
you have more control over the linal 
product. You can, for instance, in- 
sert a logo of your own design. Most 
type shops offer a variety of prede- 
signed, "canned" letterheads, none 
of which may appeal to you. 

You can also create your own let- 
terhead quickly at home if you use a 
computer or program that allows 
you to generate different type styles 
and sizes. Set your name, address. 
and phone number in one type style 
and size. Times Roman, 18-point 
bold, is a solid choice. 

Then, use a different tj'pe style 
and size for the body of the letter. A 
12-point Courier type style is the 
standard used for typewriters, if you 
want lha( look, 

THE PRINTOUT 

You wouldn't go for a job interview 
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your best. Since your printed pre- 
sentation is the stand-in for you, it 
should look well thought out and 
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ing a letter-quality (daisywheel) 
printer to produce the final copy. 

However, you shouldn't necessarily 
rule out dot-matrix printers. The 
newer 24-pin models (see "Buyer's 
Guide to Printers" in this issue] 
have a clear "near letter-quality" 
mode. Don't be afraid to use it. I 
questioned a variety of personnel 
managers al both small and large 
companies. These managers con- 
curred that resumes printed with a 
dot-matrix printer are common to- 
day. Most managers said that clean 
and easily readable material is more 
important than whether a resume is 
printed with a letter-quality printer. 

Many computer stores and copy 
centers will let you use their laser 
printers for a reasonable fee. Laser 
printers can print material very close 
to typeset quality. Some firms will 
laser print from disks received in the 
mail [see the sidebar). Most of these 
ser\'ices require a Macintosh or IBM 
PC disk that has been prepared with 
a word-processing program compati- 
ble with laser printers. The final 
product will be nearly as good as 
typeset copy and considerably less 
expensive. 

No matter what kind of printer 
you choose, use a good, high-quality 
bond paper and a fresh ribbon. After 
all. you want a manager's first im- 
pression to be a lasting impres- 
sion — not the last one. H 



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PERSONAL FINANCE 

A SOUTH CAROLINIAN AND HIS NEW YORK BANK 
Linking Electronic Banking and Home-Finance Software 
Brings out the Best of Both 



BY STEPHEN MILLER 

Like thousands of others, Henry 
Knight, Jr., an assistant U.S attor- 
ney in South Carolina, purchased 
his computer to help keep track of 
his money. He thought the record 
keeping and calculation ability of a 
home-finance program would 
streamline the process. 

The program. Managing Your 
Money {MYM). has certainly done 
that. What Knight couldn't have pre- 
dicted is that he would become a 
pioneer of sorts. He's now an elec- 
tronic customer of a big and distant 
New York bank and exchanges finan- 
cial data between his home-finance 
software and the bank. 

"It's a great arrangement — so con- 
venient." says Knight, who lives in 
Columbia, South Carolina. "I'm go- 
ing with a New "Vbrk bank, so I'm 
closing all my local bank accounts 
except one, which will let me cash a 
check. I'm pretty conservative, so for 
me to allow a New York bank to 
direct-deposit my paycheck means 
they're doing something right." 

Chase Manhattan. Knight's new 
bank, and other large banks with 
electronic banking services {e.g.. 
Bank of America and Citibank) have 
set up links between their services 
and the best-selling home-finance 
programs [see box). While home- 
banking subscribers number just 70 
thousand, according to American 
Banker, several hundred thousand 
home-finance programs have been 
sold, led by MYM (about 150,000 
copies) and Dollars and Sense 
(about 200,000 copies). As a result, 
banks have much to gain by promot- 
ing the link. 

LQTS OF CHECKS 

Knight's first use of MYM was to 
keep track of his checking activity. 
Knight writes quite a few checks ev- 
er>' month, partly as a result of help- 
ing his mother manage her finances. 
"1 didn't want to have to write a lot a 
checks by hand and certainly didn't 
want to have to keep track of all 

STEPHEN MILLER writes the monthly Tandy 
column in Machine Specijics. 




Henry KnigM Jr. 



those checks." Knight says. 

Even though he had a modem. 
Knight had to warm up to the idea 
of electronic home-banking service 
when it was first offered. Besides en- 
tering a check in the finance pro- 
gram and/or listing it in his check- 
book. Knight felt it would be too 
much trouble to enter the check a 
second or third time with the bank- 
ing service. 

Knight's local bank had a pay-by- 
phonc service that allows the user to 
call on a touch-tone phone and 
punch in codes for bills to be paid. 
Knight tried it. but didn't like the 
service's offerings. The bank doesn't 
accept insurance-premium pay- 
ments, he says, and the system still 
doesn't solve the "double-entry" 
problem. Knight wanted to enter in- 
formation once and then send it di- 
rectly to the bank. That's when New 
York's Chase Manhattan Bank came 
into the picture. 

Chase designed its Spectrum 
home-banking service to -accept data 
from Managing Your Money 3.0. a 
new version written specifically to 
work with Chase. Spectrum is avail- 



able through a toll-free number 
(both for electronic transactions and 
customer support from humans) 
and in many cases can arrange di- 
rect deposits of payroll funds. Thus. 
out-of-state payroll funds are avail- 
able for immediate use. 

As Gerald Rubin, president of 
MECA, points out, "The service can 
be useful for a number of people, not 
just New Yorkers." 

Knight was skeptical about the 
Spectrum service when it was first 
offered, but because of his faith in 
MYM. he decided to give it a try. His 
biggest worry was that a big New 
York bank wouldn't give him the lev- 
el of needed service. "I tend to Judge 
a bank by the level of its customer 
support and so far it's been out- 
standing, " he says. 

MAKING A TRANSACTION 

Knight is also thrilled with the 
way Spectrum works with MYM. He 
boots up MYM and from his list of 
payees marks which bills are to be 
paid. (For recurring transactions 
such as mortgage and credit card 
payments, the account numbers and 
mailing addresses for each payee are 
entered only once, when setting up 
the program. I Now that Knight is a 
Spectrum subscriber. Knight tells 
iWYM to set up those payments as 
items to be sent to Spectrum for ac- 
tual payment. 

Then, sitting at home in South 
Carolina, he calls Spectrum using a 
toll-free number. An option on the 
menu screen lists MYM. After Knight 



Service* 



BANK-FINANCi SOFTWARE LINK 

Monthly 
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Bank of America's 
HomeBankIng 
1800) 792-0808 
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sa 



Dollars and Sense 
IMonograml wllh Moneyltne 



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Chase Manhattan 
Spectrum 
(800) 645-6300 
(outside New York) 
(800)632-2515 
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3.0 (MECA) 



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selects that option, the rest of the 
operation is automatic. Spectrum 
reads the disk and uploads the in- 
formation about the bills to be paid. 
As Spectrum receives the informa- 
tion, it tells the user exactly what is 
happening. For example, if Knighl 
were paying his department store ac- 
counts. Spectrum would reply: 

"'[READING STORE #1. STORE #2," CtC. 

Thus. Knight can pay bills without 
writing a check, filling in a register 
stub, addressing an envelope, lick- 
ing a stainp. or trudging to a mail- 
bo.x. And when he's finished, he has 
a complete record of the transac- 
tion — both on-line at the bank and 
at home on his MYM data disk. 

GETTING INSIDE THE BANK 

Besides sending information di- 
rectly to Spectrum, you can also re- 
ceive it directly on your MYM disk. 
You can download your account bal- 
ances and determine when checks 
cleared or what bills have been paid. 
"You can ask Spectrum for the par- 
ticulars on any one account and 
download it to MYM." explains 
Knight. "I do this any time 1 want to 
reconcile my accounts." 

You can also download data from 
Citibank's Direct Access and Bank of 
America's HomeBanking into Mono- 
gram's Dollars and Sense. However, 
you need another program called 
Moneyline (S50: Monogram] to im- 
plement the download. 

MECA's Rubin says that the Spec- 
trum/MYM link works best for people 
who have active checking accounts, 
"If you write a lot of checks or do a 
lot of things through Spectrum 
Isuch as transferring money between 
accounts], it can really simplify your 
life." he explains. 

A PILOT PROGRAM 

Both MECA and Chase stress that 
the current program is in the evalu- 
ative stage. If the program gets good 
response. Rubin says it's possible 
that MECA will make MYM available 
to other home-banking ser\'iccs. 
Chase officials say links with other 
home-finance programs are also pos- 
sible if this experiment meets expec- 
tations and customers with other 
programs show sufficient interest. 

As for Knight, who says he's al- 
ready convinced seven friends to 
sign up for Spectrum, his only con- 
cern is that as the service gets more 
popular — he'll get a busy signal when 
he calls. S 




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tHAY 1987 17 



TELECOMPUTING 

TRAVEL PLANNING'S CLIPPER SERVICE 

Use Your Modem to Browse and Book Flights, 

Hotels, and Rental Cars 



When you go lo an airline ticket 
counter or call a travel agent, a clerk 
coaxes information out of a comput- 
er and matches it to your needs. 
With the proper keystrokes (the fa- 
miliar tap-tap-tap over the phone), 
the clerk can usually book you a cer- 
tain seat on a certain flight and re- 
serve a hotel room and a rental car. 

You can now do the same thing at 
home — if you have a computer, a 
modem, and a subscription to any 
electronic information service. In 
fact, you can use virtually the same 
system that travel agents and airline 
reservation clerks use — the Official 
Airline Guides' Electronic Edition, 
Travelshopper, or American Airlines' 
EAASY SABRE {see the accompany- 
ing chart Jor details]. All three are 
slightly modified versions of the 
computerized booking systems used 
by travel agents. 

Consumers have been able to 
make electronic reservations them- 
selves for about a year now. so the 
ser\'ices are still testing their wings. 
Initial responses from users vary 
widely and seem to depend on the 
type of relationship one has with a 
travel agent. 

"I find that the electronic OAG 
gives me excellent service, with tick- 
ets delivered within two days, ac- 
cording to my seating preferences," 
says Don lodice, a professor who 
lives outside Detroit. "Local travel 
agents here do not seem to be inter- 
ested in much more than tours. I 
have forsaken them for OAG." 

Bruce Drake, a newspaperman 
who lives in Washington, D.C., has a 
NICK suLLtVAN (s scnior editor of family 

COMPUTING. 



BY NICK SULLIVAN 



different view: "1 find the electronic 
OAG cumbersome to use: it's easier 
and cheaper to pick up the phone 
and call an agent." 

BOOKING A FLIGHT 

In essence, on-line reservations 
systems are easy to use. You just en- 
ter your departure city, your destina- 
tion city, and the class of service re- 
quested. (If you want to, you can 
request a specific airline.) Then 
you're given a list of fares, from low- 
est to highest. When you see one you 
like, you can request more informa- 
tion, such as the flight number, the 
restrictions, and (he stopovers. 

In practice, however, this relatively 
simple process can be confusing 
even for those comfortable with elec- 
tronic services. Each booking sj'stem 
uses different commands, and they, 
in turn, are different from the com- 
mands used by the host service. For 
instance, OAG commands differ 
from those of Dow Jones News/Re- 
trieval. EAASY SABRE commands 
differ from those of GEnie, and Tra- 
velshopper commands differ from 
those of CompuServe. 

Once you master navigation, you 
then have to decipher airline fare 
and seating codes. By pressing a few 
keys and following on-screen direc- 
tions, you can have them explained, 
but this costs you time and money. 
Of course, with so many airlines, 
flights, and special fares and restric- 
tions, it's not hard to see why the 
schedules are so confusing. 

"For some city pairs, such as Bos- 
ton-Atlanta, there are more than 100 
fares available." says Fred Levinson. 
president of Interactive Office Sys- 



tems, which has designed The Elec- 
tronic Connection travel service for 
Delphi, and other corporate systems, 
"And some might be seven-day ad- 
vance-purchase Super-Savers not 
available on Fridays." 

Once you find a flight you like, 
you can book it by entering your 
credit-card information, seating and 
eating preferences, and the flight de- 
tails. You can have the tickets 
mailed to you or you can pick them 
up at a travel agency or airline desk. 

ELECTRONIC TRAVEL AGENTS 

In general, the most satisfied on- 
line travel planners seem to be those 
who electronically browse airline 
schedules and then purchase tickets 
by phone. "1 sometimes look at OAG 
at the office and then call American 
Airlines directly," says CM. Bates, a 
CompuServe user. 

He Is not alone. According to John 
Matura, a product marketing spe- 
cialist at CompuServe, which has a 
wide range of travel services, a lot of 
corporate users act this way — in the 
end booking through a travel agent. 
Matura says another active user is 
the small- or home-business opera- 
tor who might need quick cost esti- 
mates on travel. 

Delphi offers an electronic travel 
agent to those who like the conve- 
nience of electronic access, but don't 
want to spend time mastering the 
airlines" systems. Whether you check 
the on-line travel schedules or not. 
you can type in a plain-English "in- 
stant message" asking for trip ar- 
rangements, including details on ho- 
tels and theater tickets. Within 24 
hours, a travel agent repsonds via 




18 FAMILY COMPUTING 



electronic mail with "preliminary" 
reservations; you can either confirm 
or reject the plans. 

HOTEL INFO 

Airline information is easier to 
come by than hotel information. You 
can call a travel agent and ask for 
the lowest fare to Kansas City, but 
you probably can't ask that agent to 
recommend a good hotel or restau- 
rant there. Searching by computer 
for the right spot in a strange city 
makes a good deal of sense; you get 
more information faster than you 
could any other way. 

The ABC Worldwide Hotel Guide 
(on CompuServe) and the Mobil Ho- 
tel Guide (on The Source] provide 
excellent listings of top hotels in ma- 
jor cities. You can get descriptions of 
each hotel — with listings for room 
rates, health/fitness facilities, res- 
taurants, and ratings and an 800- 
number for reservations. 

Better yet. you can search the list 



to find just the offerings that meet 
your requirements. For instance. 
you could search for tennis and get a 
list of hotels with tennis courts. 
{Neither hotel service allows you to 
make on-line reservations.) Then 
you'll begin to see that one of the 
best uses of the computer for travel 
planning is exploration. Ipancma, 
Paris, Baja — check the air fares and 
hotels while your mind wanders down 
beaches and art-lined avenues. SI 



TRAVEL PHONE NUMBERS 

American Express Advance, 1800) 327- 
2177; CompuServe, (800) 848-8199; 
(614) 457-0802 in Ohio; Delphi, (617) 
926-9400: Dow Jones News/Retrieval, 
(609) 452-2000; GEnie, (800) 638-9636: 
EAASY SABRE. (817) 540-7964; (800) 
331-2690: (8001 722-4577 in Oklaiioma; 
Official Airline Guides. (800) 323-4000; 
The Source. (800) 336-3366: (703) 734- 
7500 in Virginia: Travelshopper. (800) 
TWA-HELP; QuantumLink, (800) 392- 
8200; (703) 448-8700 in Virginia: Visa 
Advisors, (2021 797-7976. 



¥EL INFORMATI 



Service 



On-Line 
Ceanectisn^ 



Csmmeiris 



AIRltNtSCHEDULES/FARES/RESERVATIONS 



Official 
Airline Guides' 



CS, DJN/R. 
DIALOG. Source. 
Delphi 



750 airlines; hotel and car rental reser^'atlons 
Ihrough Thomas Cook 



EAASY SABRE 



Delphi, GEnie, 
QuantumLink 



650 airlines; hotel and car rental resenatlons 



Travelsliopper 



CS 



All bookings except United, Singapore. 
South-West Airlines 



HOTEL INFORMATION 



ABC Worldwide 
Hotel Guide 



CS 



Rates, laclllties, and no. ol' rooms i'or nearly 
30,000 hotels around the world: keyword 
searching 



Mobil Hotel 
Guide 



Source 



Rates, facilities, and general information on 
U.S. and Canadian hcitcls: keyword searching 



TravelData 



GEnie 



Hotel and restaurant Information for 150 
cities worldwide 



SPECIAL TOUBS/INFORMATION 



American E.\p. 
Advance 



CS, DJN/R. 
GEnie 



Package tours, gifts, travelers checks 



Discover Orlando 



CS 



Travel information for central Florida and 
Walt Disney World; accommodations, 
attractions, and campground listings 



Pan Am Travel Guide 



CS 



International Immigration and health 
requirements 



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MACHINE SPECIFICS 

NEWS, OPINIONS, QUOTES, & RUMORS 



APPLE 



BY CHARLES H. GAJEWAY 
Thanks for the mail, and keep it 
coming, either to the magazine, or 
electronically. Many questions from 
readers revolve around increasing 
the performance of an 8-bit Apple II 
for a business-oriented application. 
Indeed, since business applications 
rarely require advanced graphics or 
sound, expanding an existing com- 
puter with carefully chosen peripher- 
als — rather than buying a brand new 
computer — can be a cosi-effcctivc so- 
lution. 

Applied Engineering. Wliilc high-per- 
formance Apple II peripherals are 
nothing new. Applied Engineering 
products have become extremely 
popular during the past couple of 
years. They can add a lot of oomph 
to an Apple II Plus. lie, lie, or IlGs. 
(Stay tuned for next month's review 
of IlGS memory expansions. ) 

Applied Engineering produces 
three memory expansion products: 
RamWorks III, RamFaetor, and Z- 
RAM. The board you choose depends 
on which machine you have and 
your intended application. All three 
boards include RAMdisk and 
AppleWorks expansion software at 
no extra cost and can be equipped 
with a 16-bit processor to allow soft- 
ware like VIP Professional (the 1-2-3 
workalike) to address the expanded 
memory directly. 

lie Expansion Champ. RamWorks III 
(S179-S369, depending on memo- 
ry) is the AppleWorks expansion 
champ. The board plugs into the 
auxiliary slot of an Apple lie and pro- 
vides up to 1 MB (one megabyte) of 
extra memor>' and 80-column video 
display. Expansion modules are 
available for RGB output and addi- 
tional memory. The AppleWorks ex- 
pansion software with the Ram- 
Works board permits up to 23,000 
records in the data base and 23.000 
lines in the word processor — versus 
the normal 1,350 records and 2,250 
lines. 

lie Memary Expansion. Z-RAM is a lie 
product that comes in three models: 
Ultra 1 (S199-S249), with up to 
51 2K RAM: Ultra 2 (S269-S399), 
with up to 1 MB and a ProDOS 
clock; and Ultra 3 ($329-8459), 
which adds CP/M capability to Ultra 



2. An Ultra 1 cannot be upgraded to 

a 2 or 3. Z-RAM's memory enhance- 
ment offers the same capabilities as 
RamWorks. and any software that 
recognizes RamWorks will work on 
an equal par with Z-I^AM. 

II Pluf and AppleWorks. The Ram- 
Factor [S239-S289) board holds up 
to 1 MB and can plug into any Apple 
II or compatible I including the Laser 
128) with standard Apple expansion 
slots. The AppleWorks expansion 
software modifies the program to 
permit its use on an Apple 11 Plus 
equipped with an 80-column video 
adapter and allows up to 5.30O data- 
base records and 5.300 word-pro- 
cessing lines. 

All of Applied Engineering's pe- 
ripheral boards carry an exceptional 
five-year guarantee. The company 
will install new memory chips in 
your board for free and guarantee 
them for five years (most chips are 
guaranteed for 90 days at most). I'll 
report more fully on my tests next 
time, but all products worked well 
and produced generally impeccable 
results. 1 was impressed not only by 
Applied Engineering's products but 
by just how much you can really do 
with an 8-bit II! 

CHARLES H. GAJEWAY Cart be reached on 
The Source fiD: nBQ7g4) or on CEnle (m-. c 

G A.JKWmV ■ 



ATAR 



BY JOHN J, ANDERSON 



Three big pieces of news come from 
Atari. 

First, the new Mega ST series, 
which should be available soon, if 
not already, is a more professional, 
compact, and easier-to-expand ver- 
sion of the popular Atari ST ma- 
chine. The new model will be sold in 
1-, 2-. and 4- megabyte configurations. 

The keyboard is detached from the 
system unit and has a much better 
feel than its predecessor. The Mega 
ST also includes a battery-backed 
real-time clock, a graphics blitter 
chip, which allows for faster "draw- 
ing" of graphics images on screen 
and a bus for plugging in add-on 
boards. 

The Mega STs smaller footprint 
was achieved by packaging the CPU. 
floppy disk drive, and power supply 




Atari Mega ST 



in a module that ser\'es as a pedestal 
for the monitor. Atari also plans to 
sell a hard disk drive that can be 
stashed on top of the system unit. 

Desktop Publishing, The second bit 
of news is that Atari intends to at- 
tract the growing desktop publish- 
ing market with an advanced system 
that will cost half the price of com- 
parable products. In order to achieve 
this goal, the Mega ST computer will 
be matched with the new Atari Laser 
Printer. It was on display at the Con- 
sumer Electronics Show in Las Ve- 
gas last Januaiy. and despite some 
downtime, churned out high-quality 
copy. Atari's intention is to sell the 
complete system — including comput- 
er, printer, drive, and monitor — for 
under 83,000. The 300 dots-pcr- 
ineh laser printer will sell for under 
81,500. The target for deliveiy is late 
spring. 

Because of the speed and memory 
of the Mega ST. the laser printer can 
be software-driven and needs fewer 
of its own internal "smarts": the re- 
sult is that Atari reduced the cost of 
the printer and got greater 
versatility. 

IBM-Compatible PC. Atari has also 
announced two models of the Atari 
PC. IBM-compatible systems. One 
comes standard with 512K (expand- 
able to 640K). one internal disk 
drive, and a monochrome monitor. 



20 FAMILY COMPUTING 



.y. 


r'^m 







DATA EAST BRINGS 
ARCADE REALISM HOME! 



''i^-''\ 







KARATE CIIAMP^ - Put on your bUck belt and 
i-hallonsi; your friends or Ihe omiputLT ihrmij;!) 
nine piclurt'sque j^eltin^s in this leadini^ Mortiiii 
Arts game lo bKunif ihe Karate Champ. Por 
Commodore 64/128" and Apple II" serifs. 

COMMANDO' •- As the crack shot Comniando 
Kittle overwheimi ni; i>dd5 to defeat advancing 



_ Area, .„no^*i,.«<. 



\^^\' 



EXPRESS RAIDER" - Bandits have seized Ihe 
Gold City Express. Rescue Ihe passengers, save the 
tr.iin, and recapture the lootl For Commtvdnre 
M/128;" 

JAG TEAM WRESTLING" - I eannvork and 
stamina a re the keys, as you and your partner 
balllc vour wav through the Title Matches on yuur 
quest for the belt. For Commodore 6*128™, Apple 
11*^ series, and IBM. 

KUNG-TU MASTER'* - n.itlle the evil forces 
Ihrougli (he five dangi-rous floors in the^vizard's 
castie to rescue the captive fair maiden. I'or Com- 

adure 64/128" and Apple U« series. 



relK'l forces! Armed with only a machine gun and KUNG-TU MASTER ■ • - Datlle the evil foi 

hand grenades, vou must reach tMe fortress. For through Ihe five dangerous floors in the wiz, 

Commodore 64/128 '" , Apple II * series, and IBM. castie to rescue the captive fair maiden, hot I 

IKARI WARRIORS'" - Behind enemy lines, 
guerilb ivnrfare are your tactics as you and your 
■ p.irlner bailie through the jungles, rivers, ruins, _ 

and opposing enlrenchnients in this inter.tctive ^ 

2-pla\'er arcade hit. l-'orCommodore 64/l2H[^ 
' BRi.71K'T//KU'" - Your mission is lo retrieve the 

secret fighter plane stolen by hostile renegades. j 

Use your sophisticaled assault vehicle lo lire.ik 

Thru each of the five enemy strongholds. For 

Commodore(»4/12H'.'' 

,. DATA EAST USA, INC. 470 NEliDLliS DRIVE, SAN jOSE, CALIFORNIA 95112. (408) 2l«,-7074. 

. !«», DATA KAST USA. INC. -COMMArjOO. IKARi WAKKIllKS. AND HUfiV-W MAS I EK MFO. Ut^UlSl LICENSE f RUM CArcONi USA. SNK COKf. ANU IREM CORI'_ KKrECTIVELlf . 
COMMOtXlRI^ AITM E. AN1> IIIM Afil- ttEl.lSn™!) IHAWMAKKS OF CDMMIMXIRI; EUiOKONItS l.m.. AI'l'I.E COMI-UTKKS. INC, . AN15 IBM. KfcSI^CTIVELI 
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;, i CIRCU READER SERVICE 12 




MACHINE SPECIFICS 



priced at S699, The other system, 
sans monitor, comes with 256K (ex- 
pandable to 640K). and sells for 
S499. The systems run at two 
speeds, either 4.77 (the normal IBM 
PC speed) or 8.0 megahertz. An ex- 
ternal 5 1/4-inch (loppy disk drive 
will be sold separately. 

The Atari PC is the first IBM PC- 
compaiiblc product that includes 
support for the EGA graphics mode 
as a standard feature. The $499 
model does not support EGA, how- 
ever, but supports and includes 
CGA. Of course, an EGA monitor 
will cost about as much as the rest 
of the computer. Other graphics 
modes supported by the custom-de- 
signed graphics chip are CGA, IBM 
monochrome, and the Hercules 
graphics card. 

White there are no expansion 
slots. Atari has included a built-in 
Centronics parallel port for printers 
and an RS-232 serial port for mo- 
dems and serial printers. 

The unit will ship with a detach- 
able IBM-style keyboard, a mouse, 
and mouse port. GEM software from 
Digital Research, an IBM version of 
the system software that the ST 
uses, will also be included. MS-DOS 
Is included: users won't have to buy 
this necessary system software 
somewhere else. 



.JOHN AN'DF.RSON Can be reached on 
CompuServe (m-. 76703.645^. 



COAAMOIX)RE 



BY SHAY ADDAAA5 

Into the battle of the PC compatibles 
marched Commodore this spring, 
led by two budget versions of the 
IBM XT. Both have been marketed 
in Europe for several years. The PC 
10-1 IS999) gives you"512K and one 
5 1/4-inch drive. The PC 10-2 
(SI. 199) offers 640K and a pair of 
drives. Both computers are packaged 
with the DOS 3.2 operating system 
and Borland's SideKick. a set of 
memory-resident utilities. Each has 
five internal slots for peripheral 
cards; one slot is already occupied 
with a graphics card for mono- 
chrome and color display (not EGA). 
There is room and power in each 
unit for a 30-megabyte hard drive. 
New 1S8. Another European "im- 
port." the C 128D, has a detached 
keyboard and a built-in disk drive. 
The biggest differences between the 



D model and the wedge-shaped 128 
are that the D looks nicer and you 
can put the keyboard in your lap. 
The 128D costs about S550. com- 
pared to S299 for the plain 128, 

DeluxePaint II For Amiga. Electronic 
Arts (1415) 571-7171) has released 
DeluxePaint U (Si 30) for the Amiga 
(with 512K). It introduces more than 
50 new features. Now you can zoom 
In and edit on the pixel level and 
create pictures larger than the 
screen size (up to 8 1/2 x 10 inches). 
DelixxePaint II comes with a disk of 
clip art. 

Amiga gamers will appreciate that 
the graphics in The Bard's Tale, 
also from Electronic Arts, were com- 
pletely revamped for the Amiga ver- 
sion and not just converted bit by 
bit from the original C 64 program. 

Mailbag. James Rizley, of Colum- 
bus, Ohio, asks, "Where can I find a 
hard disk for my C 64? " Xetec's Lt. 
Kernal (1913) 827-0685: S900- 
S950), a 20-megabyte hard drive, is 
more than 60 times faster than the 
1541 when used with the 64 and 
even faster when running the 128 in 
128 mode. ICT's Data Chief comes 
in 10- and 20-megabyte models 
(130 II 371-4000: S895-$g95). The 
Data Chiefs main feature is GEOS 
compatibility. 

There's also STlOC's 10-megabyte 
model from Computer Specialties 
([305] 725-6574: S895) and Progres- 
sive Peripherals' 10-megabyte Device 
9, called The Vault (1303) 825-4144; 
$895). 

Habitat Postponed. The debut of 
Habitat. Lucas film's multiplayer 
and on-line game that was being 
tested on QuantumLink, has been 
postponed. 

SHAS' ADAMS, editor q/"Questbusters, an 
adventure game newsletter, can be 
reached on CompuServe (m-.Tasi.eoi) or 
on QuantumLink (ui. JUCHAtMiiR). 



IBM 



BY HENRY BEECHHOLD 



A reader asks how to set up a bulle- 
tin board system (BBS) to accept 
telephone calls from modem- 
equipped computers. You can set up 
a BBS using any computer with a 
disk drive and at least 64K of memo- 
ry. But if I were setting up a BBS, 
I'd want at least 256K RAM, a floppy 
disk, and a 10-megabyte hard-disk 
drive. And, of course, vou need an 



auto-answer modem, 

BBS Software. For IBM PCs and 

clones, one of the best (and least ex- 
pensive) programs around is RBBS- 
PC (Remote Bulletin Board System 
for PC). Designed by members of the 
Capital PC Users" Group, RBBS-PC 
is available from Capital PC Users' 
Group Inc. (P.O. Box 6128, Silver 
Spring, MD 20906: (301) 656-8372). 
Send SB and a mailing label. You 
can also order the program from PC- 
SIG (1030 East Duane Avenue. Suite 
D, Sunnyvale, CA 94086; [408] 730- 
9291 or [8001 245-6717). The four- 
disk program costs S6, plus S4 for 
shipping. 

Documentation on the RBBS disk 
will explain all you need to know to 
get started. Serious BBS system op- 
erators, however, will also want to 
buy Alfred Glossbrenner's compendi- 
ous Complete Handbook of Personal 
Computer Communications (St. 
Martin's Press, New York, NY 10010; 
[2121 674-5151.exl. 312: $14.95). 



iiENRV BEECHHOLD IS the author of The 
Brady Guide to Microcomputer 
Troubleshooting & Maintenance (Simon 
& Schuster). 



^_S-DOSJ 



BY STEVE MORGENSTERN 

As hard-disk prices plummet from a 
couple of thousand to several hun- 
dred dollars, more and more of us 
have abandoned fumbling with flop- 
pies for the large capacities and - 
quicker access times of hard-disk 
drives. Of course, trusting your files 
to a platter spinning at 3.600 revolu- 
tions per minute with a magnetic 
head perched a fraction of an inch 
above does have its risks. I've heard 
horror stories of disk crashes, oblit- 
erated files, and other nastiness. 
Backing up the flics from your hard 
disk onto floppies is a partial solu- 
tion. Hard-disk utility programs are 
another. 

The Norton Utilities (from Peter 
Norton Computing, Inc.; [2131 453- 
2361; S99.95) is the best-known, 
best-selling data recovery and disk 
management package for MS-DOS 
computers. It will mark off any bad 
sectors on your hard disk (they all 
have some) and keep DOS from us- 
ing them, sort your directory, and 
most important, undelete files you 
accidentally erase from a hard disk 
or floppies. ^ 



22 FAMILY COMPUTING 



ing programs 
are brought to 
you by an incredi- 
ble series of events. 




Sumo tsreslling. 
A sport of ritual and tradition. 



skeet 

shooting, 

just to name a few. 

There's its equally 
acclaimed sequel, Sum 



Gymnastics. A 
' fateful dispUiy of balfJKce^ 
poise ami concetitralion. 



The Bobskd. 

One wmtjg mmv and it's 

right down the iube. 



the hot dog aerials. And 
beg for mercy in the 
Biathlon. And coming 



• 



I 



Over 30 
of them, 
to be 
specific. 

They're 
the unfor- 
gettable 
f events of 
our best-sell- 
ing Games 
series. 

First, World 
GarmsT Eight 
intemationS 
I events rang 
ing from 
Sumo wres- 
tling to cliff diving. 
Bull riding to weight- 
lifting. Even skiing the 
Chamonix slalom. 

There's our enor- 
mously popular 
Summer GamesT --,_ 
Break records in 
track, 
swim- 





mer Games IIT Go for 
the gold in rowing, cy- 
cling, equestrian, fenc- 
ing, tiie high jump, the 
triple jum p, kayatdng, 
and more. 
Finally 
there's 

the icy ^^^^^^ 
cnaiienges aw owmg. in Acapuka, 
of Winter '-'^■''"''''"■ 

Games: Waitll you 
careen the tube in a bob- 
sled. Fly the ski jump. Or 
choreograph 
an entire fig- 
ure skating 
routine. You'll 
o. . . . . flip out over 

; Ride a oaektu^ tmll. ^ 




next summer, our.j 
newest Games 
program. (Bet- 
ter get ready 
to hit the 




Try you I h, 
at Fmani; 



beach.) 

Now, it 
may seem like a 
lot to handle 

But don't let 
world events 
get the best 
of you 



BPYX 




Alipl'' It i- compatMes. I Tii H plilKis. 

A tnri ST. C&I/I28. IBM AppU- 11 & wmpati- 

li comptiiibles. C^mifig 

fntlhr AppU' HGS. 



I Ih 8 plelyt't^, 
Appkll & aimpali- 
blcs. Atari CS4/128. bks. C64/12S. IBM 



tt compatibles. 
CIRCLE RfADER SERVICE 14 



/ 'lb ^ phyers. 

Ainina. Appk 11 & mmpuli 
b!rs. A Ian ST. C&J/12S. //J.l 
& cofnpatibles. Macintosh- 




MACHINE SPECIFICS 



The package I use for my system. 
Mace Utilities (Paul Mace Software; 
[5031 488-0224: S99) offers the 
above features, plus the ability to re- 
store your disk even if you acciden- 
tally issue the DOS format command 
(and thus wipe out the contents of 
the hard disk). 

Neither utility should be consid- 
ered a replacement for regularly 
backing up your data onto floppies. 
However, both are valuable safety 
nets and provide additional, useful 
features. 

Incidentally, the reason you can 
"undelete" files at all is that DOS 
doesn't actually erase a file when you 
issue the erase command. It just 
changes the first letter of the file 
name to an obscure ASCI! character 
and indicates when the section of 
the disk that contained your file is 
available to be overwritten. Until 
DOS reuses the space, though, the 
information is still on the disk. 

Scanning iar Scanners, For the Mac- 
intosh, a clever gizmo called Thun- 
derScan has been a big hit for quite 
a while now. By replacing the Ima- 
geWriier printer ribbon cartridge 
with a scanning device, Thunder- 
Scan travels back and forth across a 
page fed into the printer, converting 
the picture into digital information 
and feeding it to the computer. It's 
an inexpensive way to transfer im- 
ages from a piece of paper onto your 
computer screen. 

Now MS-DOS computer users with 
certain Epson printers can finally do 
the same trick. The Epson Image 
Scanner Option Kit (S300) is a scan- 
ner for the Epson EX-800, EX- 1000. 
and L9-2500 printers. The system 
comes with a program called inset 
that enables users to insert graphics 
into word-processing or spreadsheet 
documents. 

For Epson FX-80/85 owners, E. Ar- 
thur Brown Co. ([612] 762-8847) has 
announced a scanner that works on 
the same principle. PC-PlctaScan 
(S150) produces files compatible 
with popular PC paint programs. 

New Game Releases. As MS-DOS 
computers continue to sell, software 
companies continue to convert old- 
time favorites to MS-DOS format. 
New conversions include Where in 
the World Is Carmen SanDiego? 
(Broderbund), Wizard's Crouin. 
Phantasie. and Shard of Spring 
[Strategic Simulations). 



Contrlbuing editor steve morgenstehn 
can be reached on CompuServe (id: 

72545.606^. 




tssm 



BY STEPHEN MILLER 



As mentioned in previous columns, 
most CoCo 1 & 2 software will run 
on the CoCo 3. but because there 
are significant differences in the way 
the CoCo 3 works, some programs 
may not run properly. Most of the 
problems have to do with the way 
older models generate color, but 
there are also differences in the op- 
erating system that can prevent 
some packages from running at all. 

According to Radio Shack, the fol- 
lowing software will not run on the 
CoCo 3. and Radio Shack is not 
planning to upgrade or fix these pro- 
grams: Appliance/Light Controller, 
Art Gallery. Audio Spectrum Ana- 
lyzer. Cyrus. Diagnostics ROM . 
Downland. DragonFire, Kidwriter, 
Music, and Videotex. 

If you discover any other candi- 
dates for the above list, drop me a 
note at P.O. Box 782, Adelphi Sta- 
tion, Brooklyn. NY 11238. 

OS'9 Update, its unclear why 
there's been a delay in shipping OS- 
9 Level II for the CoCo 3, but some 
things are clear. You must purchase 
Level II if you have a CoCo 3 and 
want to use OS-9. Level 1 won't 
work on the CoCo 3. Second, the lag 
in Level II availability is causing de- 
lays for third-party software develop- 
ers. They are unable to furnish the 
"run time" version of OS-9 Level II, 
which allows their programs to run 
on CoCos without OS-9. 

1000 EX Second Drive. Every month, 
I plan to install an additional piece 
of equipment on the newer Tandy 
machines and report on the difficul- 
ty of installation and the clarity of 
the documentation. Most of the up- 
grades will be those that are "user 
installable." This month, the LOGO 
EX gets a second external 5 1/4-inch 
disk drive [S249.95). 

The drive gets four stars for ease 
of installation. In fact. "Installation" 
is too technical a term for connect- 
ing the external drive. All you need 
to do is plug the cable and the 
ground wire into the back of the 
drive and into the back of the com- 
puter. The only note of caution is to 
make sure that the Torroid. a round 
filter tube at one end of the cable 
used to reduce electrical interfer- 
ence, is close to the computer. 

STEPHEN MILLER, Jormer computer 
columnist for UPI. is a freelance writer 
and computer consultant. 



ORPHANS 



BY PATRICK SPERA 



Sometimes I'm asked, "Why bother 
with those old machines? Aren't 
they useless? Dead?" Well, the only 
dead computer is one that isn't 
used. Many users' groups seem to 
share my opinion. They are finding 
new uses for their computers and 
helping their communities while 
they're at it. 

The local TI users' group here in 
Oklahoma City (Sooner 99er. BBS 
[4051 672-8270) is using its spare 
machines to help handicapped chil- 
dren with learning disabilities. 
Three users' groups in San Francis- 
co (EBZUG. PUG. and SVSTUG) are 
gathering Sinclair ZXSls and TS- 
1000s. refurbishing them, and do- 
nating them to Nevada prisons. 

I'm sure other groups are starting 
equally worthwhile projects. If you or 
your users' group is involved in a 
community project, why not drop me 
a line in care of family computing and 
let me know. Information not shared 
is not information! 

Adam CP/M Software. Workman & 
Associates (1925 E. Mountain St., 
Pasadena, CA 91104: [8181791- 
7979) has several pieces of software 
available in the Adam CP/M disk for- 
mat. For daring souls who want to 
brave the perils of space, there is 
StarKill (819.50), a text adventure. 
For the do-it-yourselfers, there's 
Bulld-An-Adventure ($49.50). And 
those of you with Eve or Orphan- 
ware printer interfaces might be in- 
terested in Write (899.95). 

Timex relecommunlcations. Steve 
Ishll (18414 Deloise Ave.. Cerritos. 
CA 90001 ) and Peter Fischer (P.O. 
Box 2002. Tempe, AZ 85281) have 
released a pamphlet called The 
Guide to T/S Telecommunications. 
This 52-page manual Is packed with 
almost everything that one would 
need to know to get into telecomput- 
ing. Send S2 to Steve or Peter for a 
copy. A second, expanded edition is 
available for $5. 

Just a quick reminder that the 
second annual TS Fcst will be at the 
Holiday Inn North In Indianapolis. 
Indiana, on May 2 and 3. Call (317) 
291-6002 during evenings and week- 
ends for more information. If you're 
in the area and miss it, you'll regret 
it for the rest of your life because I 
will be there. 



PATRICK SPERA Can be reached on 
CompuServe {id. 76703,4350). 



24 FAMILY COMPLTING 



Emr Bvmm ms m ibm-pc 

WHO WAlilTS W PAY IBM PRUim 




WE HAVE A soLunoniut 



/c;ompatible PC-X! 

f 950. 00 LEASE $3 



FACTORY 
DIRECT 

^799. 

STANDARD 
MODEL 



BASE r 
With 20 ir^SahXsk $1399.00 LEASE $56/IV10 



Upon Appravsd Credit 



Our PC-XT SUPER TURBO COMPUTER runs all the popular Business 
Programs, like Lotus 1, 2, 3, Word Perfect, Wordstar, dBase III, 
Homebase, Sidekicl<, and Fligtit Simulator, in addition to running the 
programs at the standard IBM clock speed of 4.77 IVlhz, it also runs 
at 8 Mhz — almost twice as last as IBIW. 

ACS has developed tfie fastest, most powerful XT and AT computers 
available today. We have also researched the numerous software pro- 
grams available to automate your office. If you are considering buying 
a computer, call ACS. We can recommend the software and hardvi/are 
system that will best solve your business needs. 



HERE'S WHAT YOU GET 




ACS-Turbo Mother Board 4.77/8.0 Mhz 




640K of RAM 




Two 360K Floppy Drives 




Heavy Duty 135 Watt Power Supply 




Keyboard New "AT" Type with Large Enter Key 




Parallel Printer Port 




Monochrome Graphics Display Card 




High Resolution Mono Monitor 




with Swivel Base and Anti-Glare Screen 




OPTIONS 




20 MEG Hard Disk 


$449 


20 MEG Tape Back-Up 


S595 


Clock/Calendar 


S 59 


Internal Modem 300/1200 BAUD 


SI 99 


Okidata 192 Printer 


S399 




PROGRAMS INCLUDED 

Included in the purchase price is MS-DOS, the standard IBM operating 
system. With our Hard Disk Computer, you also get HOMEBASE, a 
general purpose multi-function program to perform word processing, 
electronic filing, and data base management. HOMEBASE has a built- 
in calendar, with monthly, weekly, and daily scheduling. The Homebase 
Calculator lets you perform calculations on the monitor and the ability 
to print a paper tape if desired. HOM EBASE also includes a communi- 
cation program with autodialer for communication with other computers 
(requires a modem). 



5 YEAR WARtlANTY AVAILABLE 

GUARANTEE & WARRANTY 

We guarantee you will be delighted with our ACS-Turbo Computer or 
return it within 30 days fora refund (less shipping charges). We warranty 
our Turbo Computer 100% Parts & Labor for 1 year. We believe our 
computer is even more reliable than IBM — that's why we're offering 
a five-year extended warranty for only $30.00 a year. Order early for 
the holidays — delivery may take over 30 days. 

HOW TO ORDER 

Call us at (818) 889-1092. We have experienced salespeople to advise 
you with your computer requirements. Ask for our experts — ask for 
Department FD. 

You can charge our ACS-Turbo Computer with a VISA or MasterCard. 
We also have a lease plan available for qualihed businesses, with 
payments from 36 months to 60 months, 
*IBM is a registered trademark of international Business Macliines. 



^t^^^^' 



5311 Derry Avenue, Suite A, Agoura Hills, CA 91301 

Phone: 818/889-1092 Fax: 818/889-5605 Telex: 299 353 POST UR 

EASY LINK Mailbox: 62941735 Telex: 5106018224 ACS AGRA HILLS UQ 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 2 




AMSTRAD defines the 
"Family-friendly" computer. 



D IBM® compatible with 512k memory 

and 360k double-sided disk. 
D "Mouse" featuring point and select 

graphics and windows ($500 FREE 

software included). 
D Priced under $800 including 

monochrome monitor 
D Hassle-free set up and operation. 
n Complete in the box. 
\Efk\A. OF THE ABOVE. 




• "Mouse" with software • Digital Research, lnc!s GEM 
desktop, GEMpaint, DOSPLUS, Basic 2 • MSDOS V3.2 

• 512k Memory, IBM'-compatible ■ Paper while mono- 
chrome monitor (16 grey levels) • Optional RGB color 
monitors (16 colors) • Tilt and swivel monitor stand 

• PC-XT — style keyboard • Joystick port • Speaker with 
volume control • Serial and Parallel ports • 3 PC-compatible, 
full-size expansion slots • Quartz Real-time clock • 16 bit 8086 
processor (8 MHz) • 360KB double-sided Floppy drive • Optional 
Second Floppy drive or 20MB hard drive • User manuals • CP/M-86 
Software compatibility • CGA enhanced color graphics software 

• Expandable to work in network environment for multi-tasking. 

t ]BM IS the registered trademark o1 loternaiional Business Machine Corp. 
"GEM is a registered Irademarfc of Digital Research, Inc. 




«ri.-. 



Unit pictured with optional RGB Color Mixiltor. 




The "^Family-friendly" computer 



The 
PC1512. 

For friendly families. Like yours. 

Sole U.S. Agent, Video, Inc. 

1915 Harrison Rd. 

Longview, TX 75604 

214/297-4698 

In Texas 1-800-222-5420 

Outside Texas, 1 -800-237-31 1 6 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE b 



FAMILY 
COMPUTING 



Buying or 

Selling a Used 
Computer 

FIRST-TIME BUYERS CAN GET A 
FULL SYSTEM AT A GOOD PRICE; 
EXPERIENCED USERS CAN 
USE SALE PROCEEDS 
TO UPGRADE 



BY STEVE DITLEA 




Whether you buy one or sell one, a used computer can 
mean savings of hundreds or even thousands of dol- 
lars. Once restricted primarily to swap meets and 
classified ads, the transfer of used personal computer equip- 
ment is being aided by a wave of brokerage services and stores 
dealing solely in secondhand equipment. 

STEVE DITLEA is o Computer Joumaiist: and editor of Digital Deli (Workman] . 



MAY 1987 27 



THERE'S 

A BIG DEMAND 

FOR USED 

IBM PCS, AND 

THEMAC512K 

IS MOVING 

FAST. 



The majority of computer owners upgrade, 
according to various market research surveys. 
Many people sell their original computers with- 
in a year of purchase in the quest for new 
machines with greater speed and memory. 
Computers generally change hands while still 
in prime condition. 

"The day the IBM AT was introduced and 
the day the Mac Plus was introduced, I had 
used models for sale," says Alex Randall, presi- 
dent of the Boston Computer Exchange (BCE). 
a brokerage that puts together buyers and sell- 
ers from around the country. "At first, develop- 
ers and testers sell. Within a month of a new 
computer Introduction, there's another flurry 
of activity, and then a steady market." 

The experiences of Jonelle Soelling, a su- 
pervisor at Coopers & Lybrand. a Big Eight 
accounting firm, typify the upgrade cascade. 
Her first computer was an Apple lie. "I didn't 
know what to use it for until 1 used Lotus 1-2-3 
at the office. 1 borrowed a Compaq Portable 
from the office and didn't want to give it back." 
She called the Boston Computer Exchange and 
said she wanted to sell the Apple and buy a 
Compaq. Within 24 hours. Soelling had done 
both. She got S425 for a one-drive He system 
and bought a Compaq Portable II with a 10- 
megabyte hard drive and tape backup system 
for SI. 500. Now she has a setup at home and 
at the office. 

One family's obsolete machine can be an- 
other's ideal starter system. "I paid $800 for a 
used Apple He system that would have cosi 
SI. 700 new at the time," says Maureen Pep- 
per, of North Huntington, Pennsylvania. In- 
tended for her 13-year-old daughter. Kristcn. 
her setup Includes two disk drives, a monitor, 
and educational software. 

As for the fear that previously owned 
equipment might be defective, Mrs. Pepper 
was reassured by the 30-day warranty provid- 
ed by the used computer store. Computer Re- 
naissance, where she purchased the package. 

SOFTWARE BONUS 

Software bonuses are commonplace when 
one buys a used computer. People disposing of 
a computer tend to be generous with the disks 
they've amassed, since they're often moving on 
to a different operating system. Programs are 
often included free or for a nominal charge. 
For Instance, virtually all secondhand Macin- 
toshes come with MacWrite and MacPaint, a 
Si 00 value. 

Edward Mulvj', a teacher in the Boston 
area, bought an Apple lie package from a local 
author who had used the computer to write a 
book and was upgrading to an IBM PC after a 
year. "1 wanted an Apple for the family because 
that's what we use in school. " Mulvy explains. 
The system he bought for S700 came with an 
extra disk drive, an amber monitor, a dot-ma- 
trix printer, AppleWorks, and early-learning 



BEFORE YOU 
BUY 

When looking al a system, see that It includes 
original cartons, covers, manuals, operating sys- 
tem software, and all necessary cables and con- 
nectors. If j'ou have specific applications in mind, 
be sure the system has all the memorj'. compo- 
nents, and peripherals you need and will run the 
software you want to use. Examine the system for 
dents, nicks, or stains that might indicate heavy 
use or abuse. 

Feel connections and moving parts. Check 
that all cables and clamps are seated firmly in 
their receptacles at the back of the machine. 
Open up the computer to be sure no wires or 
plug-In circuit boards arc shaky. Try out all 
switches, knobs, keyboard keys, and disk drive 
doors to determine that they are neither too stiff 
nor too loose. 

Listen to the computer system in operation. 
If there's a cooling fan, it should whisper, not 
squeal. Ditto for disk drives. Intermittent or un- 
usual noise may indicate potential problems. A 
monitor should be silent; a hum indicates the 
cathode ray tube may be about to fail. Run the 
printer to make sure it wont be loo loud when in 
use at home. 

Test the computer and all peripherals. Many 
computers come with built-in memory diagnos- 
tics and self-test disks; use them. Boot up the 
operating system disk and formal a blank disk. 
Try reading and saving a file on the disk you just 
formatted. With a two-disk system, make sure 
both drives can read and write files properly. 
Check the monitor's display: il should be crisp, 
bright, and property aligned. Try a printout, and 
examine the characters: are they fully formed? If 
you're buying a modem, call a local BBS. 

Ask about warranties or return privileges. 
Often these are negotiable, as is price if your 
inspection uncovers any defects or missing parts. 



BEFORE YOU 
SELL 

Prepare your system. Clean the keyboard, case, 
interior, and peripherals. Be sure you have all the 
parts that came with your computer, including 
manuals, DOS disk, cardboard packing Inserts, 
and original packing boxes. If you're offering soft- 
ware, you should provide original disks and doc- 
umentation. Make a list of everything. 

Set a reasonable price for your equipment. 
Check current values in magazines and newspa- 
pers, price guides, and at used computer dealers 
and brokerages. If you're missing any parts or 
manuals, discount your price accordingly. 
Should any component not be in working order. 
3'ou may want to have it fixed. Few dealers or 
individuals will accept a system "as-ls." 

Choose the best way to sell your computer. 
You may get the most for your system by advertis- 
ing in a local newspaper or shoppers' handout, 
though this will add to your costs and require 
you to screen responses. You can list your system 
with a broker who charges a 10 percent commis- 
sion on the sale. like the Boston Computer Ex- 
change (Box 1 177, Boston, MA 02103: 1617] 542- 
4414) or Micro Xchange (1727 State St.. Santa 
Barbara, CA 93101; 18051687-1320). If you prefer 
not to have strangers in your home, j'ou should 
choose a used computer dealer who can buy your 
system outright or take it on consignment.' 



28 FAMILY COMPtrriNG 



programs perfect for the Mulvy's three daugh- 
ters, ages 3 to 5. 

Leonard Saulnier bought an Apple II Plus 
from his Boston neighbor. Steve Gillespie, who 
was selling because his son had left home for 
overseas duty with the Navy. Though the Saul- 
niers already had a Commodore 64. their son 
Gilles, 17, wanted a second computer for word 
processing at prep school. 

"It was a perfect match." says Leonard 
Saulnier. "We got a reliable system with a 
monitor and printer for $400 and even got a 
VlsiCalc spreadsheet package." 

Another advantage of buying a used com- 
puter is that the original owner often provides 
assistance while a purchaser is becoming fa- 
miliar with a used system — something a dealer 
is not likely to do. 

WHAT'S HOT, WHAT'S NOT 

Secondhand models being bought and 
sold tend to be the same ones that dominate 
the new computer trade: IBM PCs. XTs, ATs. 
and compatibles: Apple lis and Macintoshes: 
and occasionally Amigas and Atari STs. "It's 
amazing how many people find that Apple is 
wrong for them or IBM is wrong for them and 
they switch to the other company." says BCE's 
Randall. "A lot may start out with one applica- 
tion, like word processing, on an IBM. and 
then decide to get into desktop publishing and 
move to a Mac." 

There is a big demand for used IBM PCs 
now that they're selling for around SI, 000, 
according to a recent weekly update report 
from the BCE. IBM AT sales are also active, 
despite the onslaught from low-cost clones. 
The Macintosh 512 is moving fast, and prices 
may drop with the new Macintosh II and SE 
coming on the market. The Toshiba 3100 lap- 
top, an IBM AT compatible, is beginning to 
move. The Compaq 386 is not yet active, but 
should be the next mover. And, the BCE report 
notes, "There is no demand for used cheap 
clones. Brand name hardware still holds its 
value on the Boston Big Board." (You can read 
the weekly BCE report on MCI Mail by typing 
VIEW BOCOEX INDEX at the MCI command 
prompt.) 

With Commodore 64s and Atari 130XEs 
selling new for less than S200, there is little 
incentive for these machines to be purchased 
used. One cKception to this rule was the deal 
offered last spring by Protecto, a mall-order 
firm. For those who turned in a Commodore 
64 and a disk drive, Protecto offered S200 
credit toward the purchase of a Laser PC 
(S749), an IBM-compatible computer. 

Out-of-production models fetch only token 
amounts, unless they were serious business 
machines %vith ample software in their heyday. 
But if you're willing to buy one of these old 
warhorses, you can find great deals. 

Used computers generally sell for 30 per- 



cent to 50 percent of current list price, with 
actual figures varying according to a model's 
age. condition, popularity, the number of ex- 
tras included, and local and seasonal demand. 
"Prices are higher during tax season in April, 
back-to-school time in September, and before 
Christmas," explains Randall. "You'll find 
bargains in Januan' after people have gotten 
new systems at Christmas." he adds, "though 
sharp-eyed consumers can spot good buys at 
any time of the year." 

BUYING THROUGH BROKERS AND 
STORES 

The Boston Computer Exchange, the 
country's largest used-computer brokerage 
firm, never actually handles equipment, leav- 



USED COMPUTER 
PRICES 

The following figures come from Ihc Orion Com- 
puter Blue Book, 1987 edition, a guide for deal- 
ers to set the cost of used equipmenl. Since 
prices lluctuaie so often, especially with the In- 
troducUon of new equipment, these prices 
should be considered as a general guide only. 
New List Is the current manufacturers suggest- 
ed price. Retail Used is approximately what 
you'll pay when buying a used computer. Wh«le< 
sale Average is what you can expect when 
selling loadealer. Prices arc for standard systems. 
but don't include other peripherals or software. A 
computer in mint condition or one with peripher- 
als and software can command a lot more money. 
Hew BelatI Wholesale 
Manirfadwrer Medel LEit Uied Average 



Apptc 



lie w/mono 
monitor 



S995 S297 SI 26 



Apple 



S945 S245 



S98 



Apple 



Mac512K 



SI. 699 S975 S410 



Apple 



Mac Plus 



S2.195 SI. 150 S445 



520 ST 
w/ mono 



S795 $310 SI 15 



520 ST 

w/color 



8999 S420 SI 75 



1040 ST 
w/mono 



S899 S375 SI 50 



1040ST 
w/color 



SI. 099 S475 SI98 



Commodore C 128 



S495 SI 25 S30 



Commodore 



Amiga 
w/color 



S1.295 S513 $21! 



Compaq 



Ponable 



S2.199 S7I0 $291 



Compaq 



Drskpro 286 S2.999 SI. 400 S579 



Epson 



Eqully I 



$995 $428 S 1 76 



Epson 



Eqully 111 w/ 
20-.MB drive 



SI. 695 $593 S243 



IBM 



XT w/ 10- 
MB drive 



SI. 995 S705 $289 



Kaypro 



286 w/ 10- 
MB drive 



82.495 S950 S395 



Kaypro 



386w/i0- 
MB drive 



S4.995 $2,898 SI. 200 



Leadens Edge Model O w/ 
20-MB drive 



S 1.895 S742 S298 



Tandy 



1000 w/10- 
MB drive 



SI. 999 $S94 S275 



Tandy 



1200 w/ 10- 
MB drive 



SI. 999 S640 S295 



Tandy 



Color 
Computer II 



S139 



S44 SIR 



Courlesv Orion Research Corp.. 
S1301;i303l 247-8855- 



1315 Mam Ave.. Durango. CO 



"THE DAY THE 
IBM AT WAS 
INTRODUCED I 
HAD USED 
MODELS FOR 
SALE," SAYS A 
BROKER 



NUY 1987 29 






Brokers at the BCE get 
Uslingsjrom sellers 
and match them wtlh 
buyers. 




ing responsibility for evaluation and delivery to 
sellers and buyers. The BCE keeps lists of buy- 
ers and sellers and puts them in touch with 
each other. Ideally, you'll find someone in your 
area, so you can inspect the equipment before 
rnaking a purchase. After a successful transac- 
tion, the seller gives 10 percent of the proceeds 
to the BCE. 

The BCE has over 1.000 used-equipment 
listings, which are updated daily. They are 
available by mail from its office (1617] 271- 
4235; SI 01. via modem on the Boston-based 
information service CitiNct (1617] 439-5699), or 
through one of 50 local affiliates around the 
country. Sellers give a short explanation of 
why they are selling, such as "upgrading" or 
"need money.'" 

There are a number c. used computer 
stores around the country, many of them Indi- 
vidual outlets. The largest chain is Computer 
Renaissance, with seven stores (in as many 
cities) and 20 expected by the end of the year. 
These stores allow you to exchange equipment 
you've bought if it doesn't suit your needs. To 
provide sufficient choices, each store stocks 
over 40 brands. 

A purchaser may be at a disadvantage be- 
cause he or she cannot be in contact with a 
system's original owner for support, but this 
factor is somewhat compensated for by most 
used computer shops' 30-day warranties. Usu- 
ally, you can extend this for a small premium. 
A few. like the Used Computer Store in Berke- 
ley. California, might even offer longer warran- 
ties. Its 90-day parts and labor warranty, lor 
all systems, is included in the purchase price. 

In addition, most used-computer stores 
will service any equipment they sell. On the 
other hand, prices at these stores tend to be 



30 FAMILY COMPUTING 



higher than buying directly from a computer 
owner, especially when system components 
and sof:ware are sold separately. 

SUPERMARKET BULLETIN BOARDS 

The best way to buy or sell a computer may 
be on a supermarket bulletin board or through 
a classified ad. You may even want to advertise 
that you're looking for a specific computer at a 
specific price; often, a system that's been un- 
derutilized or gathering dust in the garage will 
go for a song. "A reverse ad can turn up the 
equivalent of the proverbial used car driven 
only on Sundays by a little old lady," says Rog- 
er Rohrs, publisher of the Orion Computer 
Blue Book, an annual price guide for used 
computers. "Some people never got their com- 
puters to do what they wanted. They don't 
even know there's a market for their mint con- 
dition systems." 

Alternatively, a seller can place an ad in a 
supermarket. Use one of the many print pro- 
grams to make a sign that will stand out from 
the handwritten clutter on the board! If you 
make a sale, you're likely to get a better price 
than you'd get going through a broker or sell- 
ing wholesale to a dealer. 

Unless you're cttremely knowledgeable 
about computers, don't trj' to buy a system 
unless you can try it out. If you can trj' out a 
computer and it works, odds are it will contin- 
ue to do so. Compared to an automobile or a 
home appliance, a computer has relatively few 
moving parts that can break down, in fact, if 
an electronic part fails, it generally happens in 
the first months of use. during the "burn-in" 
stage. So a used computer in good working 
order is not prone to failure— one more reason 
for a thriving market for used equipment. Si 



\Y M-tciiii^i^Tl. 




PRIMITIVE 'HARD COPY' IS A THING OF THE PAST 



In the early 1980s, people referred to printouts as "hard 
copy" — as if printouts were merely inelegant copies of 
what appeared on a computer screen or were encrypted on 
a disk. Now, people use words like "publishing" and 
"printing" because printers can take screen information 
and enhance it. That's a symptom of the many changes 
in the printer market. 

In the early "80s, it was hard to find a letter-quality 
printer that sold for under Si, 500, Now, you can get good 
ones for under $300. 

In the early '80s, dot-matrix printers had a very dolly, 
"computen'" output. Now, dot-matrix printers give letter- 
quality printers a run for their money. 

In the early '80s, thermal printers required a special 
shiny paper that had the stigma of "cheap" about it. Now. 
thermal technology has changed and can produce good 
color and good icxt on special and'or regular paper. 

All this is encouraging news for computer owners be- 
cause a computer without a good printer is like a deep- 
sea fish stuck in an aquarium. What's the point of word 
processing if you can't print out your words? Whether 
people wantjusi a hard copy or a full-fledged publication 
with enhancements galore, they want it on paper. 

THREE TYPES 

Most computer owners choose one of three l>T'es of 
printers: daisywheel, dot-matrix, or thermal-transfer. La- 
ser printers, which can generate all kinds of different 

ROGER HART wrole "Buyer's Guide to The New Printers" in (he 
September 1986 issue of family computing and "Selling 
Yotirseir' in this issue. 



fonts in a very high-quality text, are catching people's 
eyes these days, but even the least expensive are priced 
close to S2,000. [See the Home-Office departtnent for a 
list of firms thai will laser-prirttfrom a disk.] 

Here's a brief description of the three main printer 
types, followed by guidelines on choosing the one right 
for you: 

Daisywheel printers are basically computerized type- 
writers. They have a wheel with spokes; on each spoke is 
a preformed letter or character that strikes the ribbon 
and imparts ink to the paper. 

Det-malrix printers use one printhead to make every 
character. It contains a head with a vertical row of tiny 
pins or wires. "When fired forward into the ribbon, the 
pins produce dots that form characters. Older dot-matrix 
printers have only nine pins: newer ones sport as many 
as 24 pins, which produce a better Image because the 
dots are closer together. 

Thermal-lransfer printers also form characters out of 
dots, except that their pins are heated, not struck into 
the ribbon. These transfer printers use a ribbon coated 
with a special waxy ink that transfers to the paper when 
warmed by the pins. Transfer printers can create text and 
graphics, and many can print in color. The special rib- 
bons, however, don't last nearly as long as regular rib- 
bons and are expensive — about $6 for a black one and 
SlO for color. 

BUYING STRATEGIES 

To choose a printer, you must first identify your needs. 
Obviously, you'd like a printer to do everything equally 



NUY 1987 3 I 



^^ . 


- J ^ -1 ^ *1 1 -1 


'MU.i 


t I 1 ^ 






■grXl 




t- M.-1, 


1 '^ -i ■ 


OA^^ 


Mm 


DraH 
Speed: cpt 


HI Qvsl 
Speedup* 


Nq. 


hrterfflcei ' 


■■ 


■■ 


^^^s. 


DOT-MATRIX $300 AN» UNDER | 


I3kn- C.-hip 120'.NL9 


S299 


120 


25 


9 


COM 




2K bulfer. Italics 


Brother M-1 109 


S299 


100 


25 


9 


P&S 




2K buffer. Italics 


Commodore MPS 1200 


S300 


120 


24 


9 


COM 




4K buffer. Italics 


Epson LX-86 


S299 


120 


16 


9 


P 




IK buffer. 8K/32K Optional 


SelhoshaSP-1000 


S299 


100 


20 


9 


COM. P. S 




1-2.5K buffer. Italics 


Tandy DMP 105 


S200 


80 


— 


8 


P&S 






$30l-$iOO 1 


Apple ImageWriter 11 


8595 


250 


45 


9 


AP. MAC 




32K buffer, color 


Brother M-1409 


S479 


180 


45 


9 


P&S 




3K buffer, italics 


Centronics CLP 11 


8320 


1(X) 


25 


9 


P&S 




2.2K buffer. Italics 


Citizen MSP-10 


S449 


160 


40 


9 


P. 1S-S54) 




IK buffer, reverse Image printer, ilallcs 


C. Uoh ProWriler Jr. Plus 


S369 


160 


30 


9 


P 1S-S50) 




Includes primer stand 


C. Itoh ProWnter210XP 


S549 


216 


45 


9 


P 






Mannesmann Tally MT87 


S599 


200 


50 


9 


AP, IBM, P, 


or S 


3K buffer, italics 


Okldau Microllne 182 


S339 


120 


30 


9 


P(S-S60, AP-S190) 


Italics 


Okldata Microllne 192 
Plus 


S499 


200 


40 


9 


IBM, P, (S-S90) 


8K buffer. Italics 


Panasonic KX-PI0911 


S429 


160 


32 


9 


P (S-S931 




IK buffer, italics. 3 million-character 
ribbon length 


SetkoshaSP-1000 


S319 


120 


25 


9 


For 5 




2.3K (P) or 10.3K (S) buffer, italics 


Star Mlcronics ND-10 


S499 


180 


45 


9 


P1S-S129) 




12.6K buffer. Italics 


Tandy DMP 130 


8350 


!00 


20 


9 


P&S 




N'o buffer. Italics 


$»01-$ 1,000 


Brother M-1709 


8699 


240 


15 


9 


P&S 




24K buffer. Italics 


Canon A-60 


S649 


200 


34 


18 


PorS 




S.5K buffer 


C. Itoh ProWriterC-315 


sagg 


300 


50 


9 


PorS 




8K buffer, color. Italics 


Epson FX-286 


8799 


200 


40 


9 


P (S. IEEE-488 
optionall 


8K buffer 


Epson EX-800 


S649 


300 


60 


9 


P&S 




8K buffer, color (SlOO) 


Epson LQ-800 


S699 


180 


60 


24 


P&S 




7K buffer 


IBM 4202 Proprinter XL 


8799 


200 


40 


9 


P. fS-S99) 




4K buffer. 8K optional {S351 


SeikoshaMP-1300AI 


S699 


300 


50 


9 


P&S 




lOK buffer, italics, color 
cartridge optional (S155) 


NEC P660 


S699 


216 


65 


24 


P 




8K buffer. Italics 


Okidala Microllne 292 


$749 


200 


100 


18 


IBM. P. S 




BK buffer, color, italics 


Tandy DMP 430 


8699 


180 


100 


18 


P&S 




No buffer, italics 


Toshiba P321 


S699 


216 


72 


24 


PorS 




2K buffer 


THERMAL-TRANSFER $300 AND UNDER | 


Erfto Hush 80 


81 00-8230 


80 


— 


7 


AT. COM. P 


. S 


Mine buffer, does Okldata graphics 


Oklmate 20 


8268 


80 


40 


24 


AP. AT ST. 

IBM. P. S 


COM, 


8K buffer, color. Italics 


DAISYWHEEL $300 AND UNDER 














Aproiek Daisy 1120 


S280 




20 




P 




2.5K buffer. Diablo 630 compatible 


Silver Reed EXP 420 


S300 




12 




P. COM 




2K buffer. Diablo 630 compatible 


$301-$600 1 


C. Uoh StaniTlterXlO-20 


8549 




22 




PorS 




2K buffer 


Brother HR-!0 


8349 




12 




PorS 




2K buffer 


Brother HR-20 


8499 




22 




P&S 




8K buffer, two colors 


Juki 6000 


8305 




10 




PorS 




- 


Panasonic KX-P3131 


8419 




17 




P (S-S931 




6K buffer 


Star Mlcronics Powcrtj'pc 


8499 




18 




P&S 




1-llne buffer, front control panels 


Tandy DWP 230 


8400 




20 




P&S 




- 


$«OI-$ 1,000 
















IBM 5223 Wheelprinter E 


8699 




16 




IBM. P 




1.5K buffer 


Juki 6200 


S810-S87B 




30 




P (88101 or 


S 188781 


3K buffer 


Silver Reed EXP 600 


S699 




25 




P. S. IEEE-488 


3K buffer. Diablo 630 compatible, wide 
carriage (accepts paper up to 17"; actually 
prints 13. 2"! 


Stiver Reed EXP 800 


S949 




40 




P. S. IEEE-488 


3K buffer. Diablo 630 compatible, wide 
carriage (accepts paper up to 17": actuallv 
prints I3.2'l 


APApplc serial; AT-Alarl XEXL; COM-Commadore 64/128: IBMlfiM cliaraclcr self P-Paratlel 


5-Serliil: CI*S-characlers per second 





32 FAMILY COMPUriNG 



PRINTER PROS AND CONS 



*«^^- 



Daisywheel Typewriter-quality print 



Slow: relatively cxpcn 
slve; primitive graphics 
only 



Dot-matrtx Can print text and graph- 
ics: some printers offer 
color option; very fast 



Type quality on some 
models not adequate 
for business correspon- 
dence 



Thermal- Can print text and graph- 
Transfer ics; relatively Inexpensive; 
quiet: color 



Requires new ribbons 
often: slower than dot- 
matrix 



well, but you have to consider tradeoffs. Choose the fea- 
tures you must have, and work from there. 

Are graphics important to you? If you use paint or 
drawing programs, chart-generating programs, or soft- 
ware that uses different type styles, graphics are part of 
your life. Similarly, if you have a graphics-oriented com- 
puter, such as a Macintosh. Amiga, or ST. you want a 
printer that can transfer images from screen to paper. To 
do so, you need a dot-matrix or thermal-transfer printer: 
daisywheel printers are capable of only primitive graph- 
ics. 

Is speed important? Faster is always better than slow- 
er, so the real answer depends on the size and frequency 
of your printing jobs. The more you have to do, the more 
important speed is. And dot-matrix printers are the 
speed kings. 

Is type quality of overriding importance? You want 
your printouts to look as good as possible, but is it 
mandatory that they are of business- correspondence 
quality? If so, you probably need a letter-quality daisy- 
wheel printer, though 24-pin dot-matrix printers produce 
t^fpe good enough to satisfy many users. 

Do you want good text but also the ability to print 
graphics? Then a 24-pin dot-matrix printer is certainly 
the choice. Thermal-transfer printers fit the bill, too, at a 
lower cost. 

Do you need wider paper to print a spreadsheet? If so. 
then you should get a wide-carriage printer, which can 
hold up to 17-inch wide paper. 

Is a buffer important? Ordinarily, your computer is 
tied up while a document is being printed out. A buffer in 
your printer will store a document (or part of it) while it's 
being printed so that your computer can work on some- 
thing else. Many printers have a 2K buffer, which holds 
about a page of double-spaced text. 

Do you want to print single sheets of paper? Then you 
should get a printer with ajiiction-jeed mechanism. 

MATCH WITH YOUR COMPUTER 
AND YOUR SOFTWARE 

Once you've narrowed your choices, you want to make 
sure you find a printer that will work with your computer 
and with your software. 

Most printers come with a Centronics-style parallel in- 
terface; since many computers also have a Centronics 
parallel connection, this is often the easiest way to go. 
Some printers can be bought with an RS-232C serial 



PRINTER COMPANIES 

Apple Coinputer, (408) 996-1010; Aprotek, 1805) 987-2454; Blue 
Chip, (602) 961-1485; Brother. (201) 981-0300: Citizen. (213) 
453-0614: Commodore. (215) 431-9100; Epson. (213) 539-9140: 
Ergo Systems. 1408) 436-7722: IBM, (800) 447-4700: C. Iloh. 
(617) 769-8770; Juki, (213) 320-4860; Mannesmann Tally. (206) 
251-5524; NEC. (617) 264-8000; Okldata. (609) 235-2600; Pan- 
asonic, (201) 348-7000; Seikosha, (201) 529-4653; Stiver Reed, 
(213) 516-7008; Star Micronlcs, (212) 986-6770; Tandy Corp., 
(817) 390-3011; Toshiba, (714) 730-5000, 






Okimate 10 
(fhermaMransfer) 



iaif 







Juki «100 
(daisywheel) 



C. Ifoh PreWriler Jr. 
(dai'matrix with ttand) 




tpten tX 386e 
(wide*(aniage de^mdlTls) 

interface, but many people like to keep the serial interface 
on their computer free to connect a modem. 

In either case, the only trick is to gel a cable that fits 
both your printer and your computer. And that's a matter 
of making sure the dealer understands what you need 
and/or reading labels carefully. 

If your computer has a non-standard connection, as do 
the Apple lie, IlGS, Atari XE/XL, CoCo, Commodore 64/ 
128. and Macintosh, your best bet is to buy a printer 
with a cable designed for that computer. 

On the software front, many people make the mistake 
of thinking that a printer with special features will 
squeeze a little extra out of mediocre software. Not true! 
The software must "support" your printer, which means 
it must have a built-in printer driver (a separate file 
containing commands that utilize the features of a par- 
ticular printer). Conversely, sophisticated software can- 
not make a mediocre printer jump through hoops. For 
instance, software that generates different type styles 
won't produce different type styles on a daisywheel print- 
er because the printer has only one character set. 

If you have a software collection, check to sec which 
printers the programs support. If you are buying new 
software, make sure it supports the printer you owm. 

Since printers are so popular, there's a bewildering 
array of models on the market.' This complicates your 
decision, but the competition among manufacturers only 
means that the prices keep going down. Check the chart, 
choose models that appeal to you. and then head out to 
the stores and examine them in action. Most printers 
have a self-test mode that lets them strut their stuff. HI 



M/aC 1987 33 



Choosing 
and Using 
Computer 
Spreadsiieets 



LEARN HOW THESE 

NUMBER-CRUNCHING 

TOOLS CAN HELP YOU 

RUN YOUR BUSINESS 

AND CONTROL 

YOUR FINANCES 



The first microcomputers were 
widely regarded as not much 
more than high-tech toys for 
electronically minded hobbyists. That 
all changed in 1979 with the intro- 
duction of the first electronic spread- 
sheet, VisiCalc. Created by Harvard 
Business School student Dan Brick- 
lin and a student at M.I.T.. Robert 
Frankston, VisiCalc is the traditional 
accountant's worksheet, with num- 
bers organized in rows and columns 
across the page and power and fiexi- 
bility that make it irresistible to busi- 
ness executives. The program put the 
Apple II (at the time the only comput- 
er that could run VisiCalc) on the 
map and started the growth of com- 
mercial, off-the-shelf software prod- 
ucts. 

Today, the VisiCalc program is just 
a historical footnote, replaced by oth- 
er, more powerful spreadsheets. Even 
the most advanced spreadsheet soft- 
ware, though, shares the underlying 
structure of the original and offers 
the same basic benefits: 

Organiialieni The computerized 
spreadsheet allows neat, organized 
entry of numerical information. Mis- 
takes or changes in the figures can 
be made on-screen as often as neces- 
sary without messy erasing and 
crossing out. 

Siie: A pencil-and-paper spread- 
sheet with more than 20 or 30 rows 
or columns soon becomes physically 
too large to handle practically. Com- 
puter spreadsheets, on the other 
hand, can extend for hundreds of en- 
tries vertically or horizontally, and a 
few keystrokes will take the user from 
section to section instantly, 

CaUulatien; In addition to entering 
figures and labels in an electronic 
spreadsheet, we can enter formulas. 
These formulas perform mathemati- 
cal calculations based on the num- 
bers we enter. Instead of your having 



STI5\'E MOKtiENSTEKN IS a Contributing 
editor Jor FAMll.^■ computeng. 

34 FAMILY COMPUTING 



to reach for a calculator, the figuring 
is all done within the computerized 
worksheet itself. 

Recalculafien: The most significant 
capability of spreadsheet software is 
the way it refigures the results of all 
the formulas on the worksheet when- 
ever you change the numbers. This 
allows users to play "what-if games. 
What would happen to company prof- 
its if you sold 20 percent more floppy 
disks? How much would your batting 
average increase if you went three for 
three in tomorrow's game? How 
much would you have in the savings 
account at the end of the year if you 
put away SlO more each week? Once 
you have set up a spreadsheet with 
the right formulas, you can experi- 
ment with the variables to your 
heart's content and see the results 
displayed instantly, 

WHAT ARE THEY 
GOOD FOR? 

When we think of electronic 
spreadsheets, the first applications 
that come to mind are business uses. 
Even if you are not responsible for 
company finances — your own or 
someone else's — there are plenty of 
ways a spreadsheet can help bring 
order to the numbers in your life. We 
mentioned two of these possibilities 
in the recalculation example above. 
Here are a few more. 

• Setting up a family budget is a 
natural task for a spreadsheet; you 
can tailor any worksheet to your 
methods of dealing with personal fi- 
nances. 

• If you play the market, you can 
easily track purchases and sales of 
stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. 

• Serious collectors can maintain 
an inventory of the items in their col- 
lections, including purchase price 
and current value for each item. 

• Many homeowners want to track 
utility expenditures or keep a record 
of possessions for insurance pur- 
poses. 



BY STEVE MORGENSTERN 

• Scientists use spreadsheets to re- 
cord results of experiments or per- 
form complex mathematical calcula- 
tions. 

• Club secretaries will find spread- 
sheets handy when organizing re- 
cords of dues payments and meeting 
attendance. 

In short, any undertaking that in- 
volves juggling numbers will be fas- 
ter, easier, and more flexible with an 
electronic spreadsheet. While data- 
base programs can also handle some 
of the same tasks, they're often not as 
flexible. And the more calculations 
you need to make, the more time you 
will save by transferring the figures 
from your dog-eared notebook to a 
computerized spreadsheet. 

THE BASICS OF EVERY 
SPREADSHEET 

Virtually every spreadsheet on the 
market is organized in the same way, 
as shown in the accompanying pho- 
tograph. Across the top is a series of 
letters, and down the side is a series 
of numbers. The letters identify the 
columns running up and down the 
screen; the numbers identify the 
rows running across. Different 
spreadsheets use slightly different 
systems to label rows and columns. 
Virtually every one uses numbers for 
rows. For the columns, most (as 
shown here) use letters, a few use 
double letters (AA, AB. AC, etc.), and 
others use numbers for both rows 
and columns. In the long run, it 
doesn't matter. 

The rows and columns form a grid, 
and each box within this grid is 
called a cell. Cells are identified by 
column and row. The very first cell in 
this example, in the top-left corner. Is 
called Al. One cell down from the top- 
left is A2. One cell to the right of top- 
left is HI. 

We locate our place in the spread- 
sheet with a cursor the size of a cell 
in our grid. The coordinates of the 
current location are usually displayed 



ELEMENTS OF A SPREADSHEET 



The fundamental simpliiify 
«f any spreadsheet— a 
structure of rows and 
(elumns— belies the 
potentially complex work 
you can accomplish with it. 
This screen shot of a 
spreadsheet [MotCelttrom 
Bravo Technologies) 
illustrates many of the 
characteristics common to 
the category. Beneath the 
nome of this particular 
worksheet ("Family Budget 
1987") ere the alphabetical 
labels for each column. The 
first column on the left is 
"A" and the one on the for 
right is labeled "E." To see 
more columns, you can press 
the cursor keys (or, since 
this is the Macintosh, use a 
mouse) to scroll 
heriiontally. The rows are 
numerically labeled on the 
left, beginning with "1," 
and, in this screen, going 
down to row 10, Again, you 
can scroll to see more. 
The box where each 
column and row intersect is 




called a cell. Our cursor is in 
cell B5— the January figure 
for savings— which is 
highlighted by a bold line. 
You can also tell which cell 
the cursor is in by looking in 
the upper left-hand corner, 
where the current cursor 



location is alwoys indicated. 

While cell SS itself 
contains the figure 
"$538.00," the prompt line 
toward the top of the screen 
shows the formula that 
produces that figure. The 
forumla reads "B3 * 0.11 + 



B4"j here's how that works: 
First, the formula takes the 
figure in cell B3— $2400.00, 
or this family's monthly 
Income from salary— and 
multiplies it by 0.11, or 12 
percent, the amount of 
income this family is 



looking fe save. (Note that 
the asterisk [*] is the 
computer's symbol for 
multiplication,) Twelve 
percent of $1400.00 equals 
$288.00. But we're not 
finished, because then the 
formula adds the contents of 
cell B4— in this case, any 
extra income for January, 
or $350,00. The sum of 
$250.00 and $188,00 is 
$538.00, the contents of cell 
BS. 

The unseen formulas in 
cells CS for February, DS for 
March, and ES for April do 
the same thing— multiply 
monthly income from salary 
by 12 percent and add in 
any extra income for that 
month. Other cells in this 
screen shot— such as the 
ones in column B (January), 
rows 7 through 10— keep 
track of some typical 
expenditures. For example, 
the figure at the bottom of 
column B, $1 1 7.50, is a 
subtotal of utility costs for 
that month. 



on what's called the prompt line. In 
the photograph, we can see the cur- 
sor is at location B5, as confirmed by 
the indicator at the top-left on the 
screen. 

You can enter three types of infor- 
mation into any single cell within the 
grid: text, a number, or a formula. 

Text and numbers are simply typed 
in where you want them. If the infor- 
mation to be entered is too wide to fit 
in a column, you can use one of the 
format commands to make the 
spreadsheet columns wider. Most 
spreadsheet software lets you choose 
between making all the columns wid- 
er or narrower simultaneously (called 
a global change) or adjusting the 
width of different columns individ- 
ually. 

Wlien you type numbers in place on 
the spreadsheet, you don't include 
commas, dollar signs, percent signs, 
or other notations (except decimal 
points for numbers with fractional 
parts). Instead, if you want the dol- 
lars-and-cents figures in your work- 
sheet to look right, you specify how 
the number will look by using anoth- 
er format command. 

In designing your spreadsheet, you 
can work with several different kinds 
of format commands. Most spread- 
sheets allow you to make the infor- 
mation in a cell line up with the right 
edge of the cell (normal for numbers), 



with the left edge, or the center. You 
can specify the number of decimal 
places you want before a number is 
rounded off. You may also have op- 
tions such as choosing whether or 
not a comma should be displayed in a 
four-digit or larger number, whether 
negative numbers should be dis- 
played with a minus sign or in paren- 
theses, and whether scientific nota- 
tion should be used for especially 
large numbers. 

FORMULAS AND FUNCTIONS 

The strength that makes an elec- 
tronic spreadsheet worlds apart from 
its paper counterpart is the ability to 
enter a formula in a spreadsheet. Any 
formula takes the numbers entered 
in the cell(s) you specify, performs 
the mathematical operation(s) you re- 
quest, and then displays the result in 
the cell that contains the formula. 

In our example of a budget spread- 
sheet, there is a simple formula in 
cell B5 for calculating how much 
money might be in savings at any 
point: B3*0. 12 + B4. This formula 
takes the amount entered in cell B3 
(normal income), multiplies it by .12 
(or 12 percent, which is the percent- 
age of income this family wants to 
save), then adds the result to the 
amount entered in cell B4 (which rep- 
resents any income beyond normal). 
Notice that the result of the calcula- 



tion appears in B5, while the formula 
is visible in the prompt line (since 
our cursor is in the formula cell). 

If we change the figures in either 
B3 or B4 — the cells referred to in our 
formula — the formula can automati- 
cally recalculate based on the new in- 
formation and display the updated 
result in B5. 

You can use any standard arithme- 
tic operation in a formula (addition, 
subtraction, multiplication, and divi- 
sion). In addition to these basics, 
each spreadsheet comes with its own 






set of additional operations, called 
/unctions, built in. 

Some functions are simply short- 
cuts that streamline spreadsheet 



MAY 1987 35 



SUGGESTED SPREADSHEET SOFTWARE 



Each of the features and func- 
tions hsted along with the 
spreadsheets below is de- 
scribed in the rnain text of this 
article. Also Included is the 
maximum size (or dimension), 
measured in columns and 
rows. But, depending on your 
computer's memory and what 
you've put into each cell (for 
instance, text uses less memo- 
ry than formulas), the maxi- 
mum size can't always be 
reached. 



V2'3 (Release 2.01), Lotus 
Development Corp. (617) 577- 
8500. 256K IBM PC. S495. 
Max. size: 256 cols, x 8.192 
rows. 

The industry standard, and 
righlfuUy so. Can be custom- 
ized to meet needs of most de- 
manding user, yet beginners 
can get their work done pain- 
lessly. Excellent documenta- 
tion. Features protected and 
hidden cells and 89 functions, 
including logical, financial, 
string, and dale/time. Also 
macros, graphing, password 
protection, memory indicator, 
named ranges, windows, fixed 
titles, table lookup, sorting, 
data base, and on-line help. 
Copy-protected, but allows 
single hard-disk Installation. 

Analyie! Micro-Systems 
Software. (305) 391-5077. 
512K Amiga, Atari ST. $150. 
Max. size: 256 cols, x 8.192 
rows. 

Flexible design lets user de- 



cide whether to enter com- 
mands via keyboard or 
mouse based on one's prefer- 
ence. Features protected cells, 
44 built-in functions (includ- 
ing logical, financial, and 
date), macros, graphing, 
memory remaining indication, 
named ranges, windows for 
graphics, fixed titles, table 
lookup, sorting, and on-line 
help. Not copy-protected. 

E-Z Cole. Royal Software, 
(503) 683-5361. Atari ST. S70. 
Max. size: 300 cols, x 999 
rows. 

Though the manual is on 
the siim side, this GEM-based 
program offers all the spread- 
sheet power most of us will 
need, plus a useful pop-up cal- 
culator and ability to attach 
text notes to individual cells. 
Features 34 built-in functions 
(Including logical and finan- 
cial), windows, fixed titles, ta- 
ble lookup, sorting, and on- 
line help. Not copy-protected. 

MocColc. Bravo Technol- 
ogies, Inc., (415) 841-8552. 
512K Macintosh. $139. 
Max. size: 125 cols, x 999 
rows. 

An elegant, easy-to-use pro- 
gram. Although it lacks graph- 
ing and macro capabilities, 
MacCaic has Undo commands 
not found elsewhere, total 
point-and-cllck simplicity for 
building formulas, excellent 
scrolling control, a terrific util- 
ity to attach text notes to cells, 
nice use of Mac fonts, and the 
ability to export formatted 



charts with rules into word- 
processing or desktop-pub- 
lishing applications. Features 
protected cells, 50 functions 
(including logical and finan- 
cial), memory remaining indi- 
cation, named ranges, win- 
dows, table lookup, sorting, 
and on-line help. Not copy-pro- 
tected. 

MaziPlnn. Oxxi, (408) 373- 
4018. Amiga, S150. 
Max. size: 512 cols, x 65,536 
rows. 

Mousing around stream- 
lines formula entry. Option to 
have program speak entries 
aloud for audible confirmation 
of data entry can be useful, as 
can the ability to attach text 
notes to individual cells. Fea- 
tures 63 built-in functions (in- 
cluding logical, financial, and 
date/time), graphing, named 
ranges, windows, table look- 
up, sorting, data base, and on- 
line help. Macro capability 
available as separate S50 pro- 
gram. Not copy-protected. 

Mi«re$ell Excel. Microsoft, 
(206) 882-8080. 512K Macin- 
tosh. $395. 

Max. size: 256 cols, x 16,384 
rows. 

Top-of-the-line choice for 
both convenience and capabil- 
ity. Loaded with distinctive 
features, including user-de- 
fined number formats and 
functions, exceptional graph- 
ics, easy linkage between 
spreadsheets, and complete 
macros. Sophisticated fea- 
tures are complex to learn, but 



you can use Excel at any level 
of expertise. Features include 
protected and hidden cells, 85 
built-in functions (Including 
logical, financial, string, date/ 
time), macros, graphing, pass- 
word protection, memory re- 
maining indication, named 
ranges, windows, table look- 
up, sorting, linked work- 
sheets, data base, and on-line 
help. Not copy-protected. 

Microsoft Mwltiplan. Apple, 
256K IBM PC, Macintosh from 
Microsoft, (206) 882-8080. 
$95-$195. C 64/128 from 
Epyx. (415) 366-0606. S40. 
Max. size (IBM): 256 cols, x 
4,095 rows. 

Max. size (Apple. C 64, Mac): 
63 cols. X 255 rows. 

Features protected cells, 40 
built-in functions (including 
logical, financial, string), mac- 
ros (IBM only), memory re- 
maining indicator, named 
ranges, windows, fixed titles, 
table lookup, sorting, linked 
worksheets, and on-line help. 
One of the most powerful for C 
64/128; Includes 12 prepared 
worksheet templates. Apple, 
IBM. and Mac versions are not 
copy-protected. 

Pipnner's Choice. Personal 
Choice Software/Activision, 
(415) 940-6044. Apple, C 64/ 
128, IBM PC/PCjr. S40-50. 
Max. size: 80 cols, x 255 rows. 

Smooth-working basic 
spreadsheet will suit average 
users' needs. Features 14 
built-in functions (including 
financial), memory remaining 



construction and operation. For ex- 
ample, the SUM function will add the 
numbers in a specified range of cells. 
In one spreadsheet example, cell D8 
contains the formula {?( SUM 
(A6..D6). The ((i sign is the standard 
way to show that you are using a 
built-in function, and the periods be- 
tween A6 and D6 are one common 
way to Indicate a range of cells on 
your worksheet. This formula totals 
the figures in cells A6, B6, C6, and 
D6, and puts the result in D8. You 
would get exactly the same total by 
entering the formula -1-A6 -I-B6 -1-C6 
+ D6. Using the SUM function makes 
it easier to enter, though, especially if 
you want to add the figures in a 100- 
cell row or column! Also, if you later 
add one or more rows or columns 
somewhere in the middle of a total, 
the SUM function will automatically 
include them; otherwise you'd have 
to add the new cell reference manual- 
ly, and that can cause problems. 

Built-in financial calculation func- 
tions are also popular. For instance, 



a future-value function calculates the 
result of an investment at a stated 
interest rate over a specified period of 
time. Since the numbers plugged 
into a function can be pulled from 
other cells in the spreadsheet, this 
kind of financial function makes 
short work of "what- if decisions for 
investments. Let's say you've invested 
81,000 in a certificate of deposit (CD) 
at 5 percent yearly interest. The fu- 
ture-value function can show you 
how much the CD will be worth in 
four years, including compounded 
interest. What if you invest 82,500 
instead? The function will show you 
that value, too. 

Generally speaking, the more built- 
in functions available in a given 
spreadsheet, the better. You may nev- 
er need a function that calculates the 
length of a label on your spreadsheet, 
the absolute value of a number, or 
the depreciated value for a specific 
period, but I have yet to see a spread- 
sheet that sacrificed basic functions 
to add on complex ones. 



BELLS AND WHISTLES 

You can do a lot with a fairly ordi- 
nary spreadsheet package, and it 
won't cost much either, as our list of 
recommended software demon- 
strates. However, spreadsheets are a 
hot software category, and publishers 
have come up with a host of extra 
features that keep users wanting to 
upgrade. Here's a rundown of some 




36 FAMILY COMPUTING 



Indicalor, and windows. Copy- 
protecled. 

Powerledger. Abacus Soft- 
ware. (616) 241-5510. Alan 
ST. S80. 

Max. size: 65.000 cols, x 
65,000 rows. 

Several rough edges here 
(mediocre documentation, no 
on-line help, and slim selec- 
tion of built-in functions), but 
nearly instantaneous graph- 
ing in multiple windows is a 
strong selling point. Features 
24 functions. memor\' remain- 
ing indication, named ranges, 
and sorting. Not copy-protect- 
ed. 

Proclicolc II. Practicorp. 
(617) 965-9870. Apple, C 64/ 
128. 850. 
Max size: 250 cols, x 125 rows. 

Includes interesting "Direc- 
tion" feature that lets you cre- 
ate spreadsheet with prompts 
that ask users for informa- 
tion. Documentation is only 
so-so. Features 22 built-in 
functions (including logical 
and financial), some graphing. 
memor>' indicator, fixed titles, 
table lookup, sorting, and on- 
line help. Not copy-protected. 

SuperCalcSa. Computer As- 
sociates. (408) 942-1727. 
128K enhanced Apple Ile/Ilc. 
S195. 
Max. size: 63 cols, x 254 rows. 

Excellent full-featured pro- 
gram features extremely flexi- 
ble graphing capabilities, in- 
cluding double hi-res. 
Features protected and hidden 
cells. 48 built-in functions (in- 



cluding logical, financial, and 
date), disk-based macros, 
memory-remaining indicator, 
windows, fixed titles, table 
lookup, sorting, data base, 
sideways print utility, on-line 
help, and exceptional docu- 
mentation. Not copy-protect- 
ed, 

SuperCalc4. Computer Asso- 
ciates. (408) 942-1727. 256K 
IBM PC. S495. 

Max. size: 255 cols, x 9.999 
rows. 

The leading rival to 1-2-3. 
SuperCalc 4 offers easier mac- 
ro entry and printing, better 
graphics, and includes side- 
ways priming utility — but 
lacks J-2-3S text and time 
handling functions. Features 
protected and hidden cells. 92 
built-in functions (including 
logical, financial, and date), 
macros, graphing, memory re- 
maining indication, named 
ranges, windows, fixed lilies, 
table lookup, sorting, data 
base, and on-line help. Not 
copv-protcctcd. 

SwiffCalc. Timeworks. (312) 
948-9200. Atari ST. C 64/128. 
IBM PC. $40-$80. 
Max. size (Atari): 256 cols, x 
8,192 rows 

Max. size (C 64): 104 cols, x 
250 rows 

Max. size (C 128, IBM): 250 
cols. X 250 rows. 

Uses pull-down menus; 
boasts extensive printer and 
interface support. Features 
protected cells. 19 built-in 
lunclions (including logical 



and financial), graphing, 
memory remaining indication, 
fixed titles, sorting, and side- 
ways print utility. Not copy- 
protected. 

SynCaU. Synapse/Broder- 
bund. (415) 479-1170. Atari. 
C 64/128 (packaged together). 
S50. 
Max size: 128 cols, x 255 rows. 

Easy-lo-usc menu-driven 
program. Features protected 
cells, 27 built-in functions (in- 
cluding logical and financial), 
named ranges (called "labeled 
rows and/or columns"), memo- 
ry remaining indication, win- 
dows, fixed titles, table lookup, 
and sorting. Copy-protected. 

The Twin. Mosaic Software, 
(617) 491-2434. S99. 320K 
IBM PC. 

Max. size: 255 cols, x 8,192 
rows. 

Capable 1-2-3 (Revision lA) 
compatibility at one-quarter 
the price. Features protected 
cells, 56 built-in functions (in- 
cluding logical, nnancial. and 
dale), macros, graphing, 
memory remaining indication, 
named ranges, windows, fixed 
titles, table lookup, sorting, 
data base, and on-line help- 
Not copy-protected. 

VP.PIaitner. Paperback Soft- 
ware. (415) 644.2116. 256K 
IBM PC. SI 00. 

Max. size: 256 cols, x 9.999 
rows. 

This J -2-3 (Revision lA) 
clone adds two potentially sig- 
nificant features: reading and 
writing dBase II or HI files and 



a complex multidimensional 
data-base feature that (to sim- 
plify the concept a bit) links 
up to five spreadsheets auto- 
matically. Beginners beware: 
The multidimensional feature 
is extremely complex, and 
while the program can be used 
very effectively as a straight 
Lotus clone, Ihe manual as- 
sumes you already know how 
to use J -2-3. Features protect- 
ed cells, hidden cells. 59 built- 
in functions (including logical. 
financial, and date), macros, 
graphing, password protec- 
tion, memor>' remaining indi- 
cation, named ranges, win- 
dows, fixed lilies, table 
lookup, sorting, and on-line 
help. Copy-protected (unpro- 
tected disk available for SIO 
additional). 

Wards & rigures. Llfetrec Soft- 
ware. (408) 373-4718. 256K 
IBM PC. S195. 

Max. size: 256 cols, x 9,999 
rows. 

Unique combination of fully 
featured Lotus 1-2-3 I Revision 
lA) compatible spreadsheet 
and reasonably full-featured 
word processor, which share 
figures interactively. Audit ca- 
pability helps identify spread- 
sheet errors. Features protect- 
ed and hidden cells, 59 
functions (including logical, fi- 
nancial, and dale), macros, 
graphing, memory remaining 
indicator, named ranges, win- 
dows. pLxed titles, data base, 
and on-line help. Not copy-pro- 
tected. 



special features you'll find. 

Protected and/pr hidden cells. It is very 
handy to be able to protect a cell or 
group of cells from being changed. 
You may have entered in a cell a for- 
mula or a set of numbers that are 
constants and not want them to be 
accidentally altered. Invoking the 
protection feature will preserve those 
entries. A protected cell can easily be 
unprotected and changed, but the 
procedure for doing so requires a sep- 
arate command and is very unlikely 
to occur by accident. 

Hiding a cell's contents from view 
can also be useful, particularly when 
you reach the printout stage. You 
might want to print out a copy of 
your spreadsheet, but leave out a col- 
umn of numbers because they are 
confidential. Perhaps you simply 
want to make the printout easier to 
read. Hiding a cell or group of cells 
does not remove the information 
from the spreadsheet, and the figures 
are still used in calculating formulas; 
the hidden cells either disappear (un- 



til called back) or simply appear as 
blanks on the screen or in print. 

Logical fumliens. Extremely powerful 
features found in high-level spread- 
sheets are logical functions. These 
functions actually evaluate whether a 
condition is true or false, and they 
act differently, depending on the re- 
sult. For example. Lotus 1-2-3. Su- 
perCalc, and others include the IF 




function. Let's demonstrate a simple 
case; 

You have created a spreadsheet 
containing the averages of every 
bowler in your league. You want to 
Invite all those with averages over 
175 to compete in a championship 
tournament. Assuming that the first 
bowler's average is in cell D4, you 
could enter a formula in E4 that 
reads as follows: 

(II IF (D4 > 175, ■•Invite","Don't In- 
vite"). 

When the spreadsheet calculates 
the value of cell E4, It first checks to 
see whether D4 (the cell that contains 
the average) is greater than 175. If it 
Is, it enters the first option from your 
formula (the word "Invite") in cell E4. 
If it is not. it prints the second op- 
tion. "Don't Invite." You can copy this 
formula (or any cell's contents, for 
that matter) and paste it in the entire 
E column. Now you can instantly 
identify the championship contend- 
ers in your league. 

Logical functions have many poten- 



MAY 1987 37 



tial uses in a sophisticated spread- 
sheet. For example, if you were using 
a spreadsheet to prepare invoices for 
your mail-order huslncss, a logical 
function could be handy in calculat- 
ing sales tax. Orders outside your 
home state would not be subject to 
sales tax. while local orders would. By 
entering a logical function in your 
"Sales Tax" column that checks an 
earlier cell containing the state ab- 
breviation of the purchaser's ad- 
dress, your spreadsheet could auto- 
matically figure the tax when 
appropriate, or leave it blank for out- 
of-staters, 

Telling time. Datc-and-time functions 
are another advanced feature useful 
for many calculations. For instance, 
if you want to ligurc out a monthly 
sales average, you will need to know 
how many days elapsed between two 
dates entered in separate spread- 
sheet cells. A days-betwcen function 
will calculate this for you automati- 
cally. 




Other advanced functions found in 
high-level spreadsheet software can 
include financial functions to deter- 
mine net present value, internal rate 
of return, interest rale or compound- 
ing periods required to achieve speei- 
lied results, and depreciation calcula- 
tions. 

FEATURES TO LOOK FOR 

Motros. Macros arc a vciy useful op- 
tion if you will be using your spread- 
sheet heavily or if other people vvlll be 
entering information into a spread- 
sheet that you create, since they can 
help you automate data entry and 
prevent errors. A macro contains a 
series of keystrokes and plays them 
back for you at the touch of a key or 
two. For example, say you frequently 
add a set of labels — such as the 
months of the year — to the second 
row of your spreadsheet. You could 
create a macro that generates all 12 
labels, and January. February. 
March, etc. would automatically be 
entered in the correct cells each time 

38 FAMILY COMrUTING 






you called the macro. 

!n some advanced spreadsheet pro- 
grams, such as 1-2-3. macros can in- 
clude logical functions. Such macros 
produce different results, depending 
on the nature of the data in your 
spreadsheet. For example, a macro 
for a business budget might allow 5 
percent of income for advertising if 
gross income from sales is above a 
set amount, but only 2 percent if 
gross income falls below that 
amount. Sometimes macros can be 
Interactive — that is. they execute to a 
certain point, wait for the person at 
the keyboard to enter data, and then 
continue on with the commands 
stored in the macro. In this way you 
can create an automatic data-entry 
system within your spreadsheet, 
leading other users by the hand. 

Creating complex macros is really a 
form of programming. There are 
scores of books and magazine arti- 
cles, as well as on-line services, that 
offer collections of ready-to-run mac- 
ros for the most popular business 
spreadsheets. In fact, the availability 
of prepared macro definitions Is a po- 
tent reason for so-called "power us- 
ers" to stick with a popular package 
(or a work-alike clone). 

Crgphiiig, This popular "extra" pre- 
pares graphs (such as pie charts or 
bar graphs) based on information en- 



1 



^ 



tercd in your worksheet. The range of 
available graphs varies from program 
to program and so does the flexibility 
in adding labels to a graph. 

Also important here is how many 
different printers arc supported. If 
your printer generally works with 
your computer, you'll be able to print 
out a worksheet created with any 
spreadsheet software. Every- printer 
has its own distinctive system for 
printing graphics and requires spe- 
cial software support for each brand 
of printer. If your spreadsheet does 
not include the capability to produce 
output for your printer, you'll just 
have to settle for looking at the graph 
on-screen. Or in the reverse case 
(such as if you have a monochrome 
display card on an IBM PC or compat- 
ible), you might be able to print your 
graphs, yet not see them on-screen. 

Password protection. A handy feature 
if you will be working with confiden- 
tial figures. You simply decide on a 
password, and nobody will be able to 
load your spreadsheet without it. Of 
course, if you forget the password 
yourself, you can kiss your work 
good-bye. Paranoia has its price. 




Remaining niemery indicator. A simple 
feature, yet one missing from several 
software packages reviewed. A run- 
ning indication of the amount of 
computer memory left is far prefera- 
ble to an "out of memory" error mes- 
sage after you've already gone too far. 

Named ranges. Most of us work better 
with words than with cryptic cell ad- 
dresses. The ability to give names to 
individual cells or ranges of cells is 
therefore very convenient and helps 
minimize errors. 

Say you have all of your sales fig- 
ures in column D. rows 3 through 
15. You could tell the program to call 
these cells SALES, and then use 
SALES in any formula you wrote that 
referred to this range, such as (<' SUM 
(SALES). 

Windows and fixed titles. It doesn't 
take long for your spreadsheet to 



grow larger than a single sereen 
across or down. Windows and fixed 
titles are two ways to cope with this 
problem. 

Programs that provide window ca- 
pability allow you to split your screen 
into two or more sections, each dis- 
playing a different part of your work- 
sheet. This lets you see the area 
where you are currently entering data 
and watch the effect of these entries 
in cells many rows and columns away 
that are displayed simultaneously In 
the other window. 

A less desirable but still worthwhile 
ability is setting fixed titles. You tell 
the program lo keep a certain num- 
ber of rows and/or columns on screen 
at all times. Then, when you scroll 
your spreadsheet, the titles — such as 
month, names, or budget items — 
stay in place. 

Table lookup. This powerful capabili- 
ty lets you set up a table of informa- 
tion in one section of your spread- 
sheet and pull out appropriate values 
from it elsewhere. For example, you 
might build a table of sliipping 
charges (1 lb.. SI, 2 lb., $1.50, etc.) 
for an invoicing spreadsheet. You 
could then automatically insert the 
correct shipping charge in the in- 
voice with the lookup function. In 
this case, anything less than 2 lb. 
would return a value of SI. 

Sorting. If your data is arranged in 
rows wilh column categories, a sort- 
ing feature lets you rearrange the in- 
formation into numerical or alpha- 
betical order. For instance, you 
might have employee Last Names 
running down the first column and 
Salary, Absenteeism. Phone Exten- 
sion, and other categories in subse- 
quent columns across the page. A 
sort function lets you alphabetize the 
first column of last names and still 
keep each employee's data aligned 
with his or her name. 

Linked worksheets. Potentially valu- 
able but tricky to use, the ability to 
link spreadsheets lets you pull infor- 
mation from another worksheet di- 
rectly Into your current worksheet. 
Let's say you are keeping track of 
baseball team performance using 
linked worksheets. You might set up 
separate spreadsheets for pitching, 
fielding, and hitting data, A fourth 
summarv' worksheet could pull select- 
ed information from these individual 
worksheets to compile overall team 
statistics. 

Attached text notes. You know those 
sticky yellow papers that people use 
to attach notes to documents? The 
software equivalent is found in some 
spreadsheet programs: the ability to 
attach text notations to individual 



cells in the worksheet and call them 
up on-screen when needed. This is 
especially handy when you want to 
remember the source of a particular 
figure or the idea behind a complicat- 
ed formula or to keep some support- 
ing information handy. 

Data-base capabilities. Some high-lev- 
el spreadsheet software, such as J -2-3 
and Microsoft Excel, includes data- 
base capabilities, but it is important 
to understand the limitations of 
these functions compared to full- 
fledged data-base management soft- 
ware. 

What you get here is really a 
spreadsheet approach to dealing with 
data. First, you cnlcr your informa- 
tion across columns. Then, you use 
built-in functions to sort the data or 
search for those items that meet your 
specifications and copy them into an- 
other section. These capabilities are 
better than nothing, but they don't 
compare to the reporting capabilities 
of even a moderately sophisticated 
dedicated data-base program. 

Sideways printing. Your worksheet 
printouts arc generally limited to the 
width of your printer, which is ordi- 
narily 80 characters, or up to 136 
characters using compressed type. 
Sometimes this Just isn't enough 
room to fit all the columns you would 
like, though. One solution is to print 
out the spreadsheet in sections 
(many programs do this automatical- 
ly). An alternative is a neat utility 
program that lets you turn the print- 
out on its side, allowing you to in- 
clude as many columns as you need 
on continuous-form paper (of course, 
that means the depth of the rows 
printed is now limited, but at least 
the option cxistsl. Originally avail- 
able only as an extra-cost software 
add-on program, this useful utility is 
now included in several spreadsheet 
packages. 

Copy protection. Copy-protected game 
software is an inconvenience, but 
rarely a disaster. The worst that can 




happen is your disk will crash, and 
you'll be deprived of the joys of explor- 
ing dungeons or zapping aliens until 
the publisher sends a replacement. 
However, spreadsheets, just like word 
processors or other productivity pro- 
grams, are vital tools for many of us, 
and if they crash, we burn. We have 
noted copy protection or the lack of it 
in our recommended software list- 
ings. 

On-line help. 11 is always useful to 
have a screen of advice available at 
the touch of a key in addition to the 
users' manuals. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

Spreadsheet software is different 
from other forms of productivity soft- 
ware in an interesting way. While an 
advanced word processor, relational 
data base, or business graphics pro- 
gram may be too difficult for a novice 
to use even at its basic levels, begin- 
ners and veterans alike can generally 
use the same spreadsheet software, 
each at his or her own level of exper- 
tise and interest. 

The intimidation factor involved in 
using a powerful program like Micro- 
sqft Excel is substantial, with man- 
uals as thick as your wrist and lists 
of commands tfiat seem to go on for- 
ever. Rest assured, though — you can 
make lightweight use of heavyweight 
spreadsheet software, if that's what 
you want to do. The learning process 
is no more difficult than it would be 
for a less powerful package, the basic 
commands aren't any more compli- 
cated, and there are actually more 
books and articles available to lead 
you by the Iiand than there are for 
less popular, less powerful programs. 
For some, another potential advan- 
tage of dealing with the heavyweights 
is compatibility of your work with the 
work done at the office. 
Price, though, is a major factor to 
be considered. The Planner's Choice 
spreadsheet, for instance, has all the 
functions 1 personally need, and its 
list price is a mere S50, compared 
with S495 for the latest release of Lo- 
tus 1-2-3. For lUM or compatible us- 
ers concerned about their pocket- 
books, there are several good 1-2-3 
clones priced around the SI 00 mark. 

Look for the practical and conve- 
nient features that suit you at a price 
you can afford. Today's spreadsheet 
software can perform more tricks 
than Rex the Wonder Dog (I even 
found one for the Amiga that can 
talk!|. Just look for the features that 
arc meaningful to you and remember 
(it's been hard for me) — the columns 
run up and down the screen and the 
rows go from side to side.iK^ 



MAY I9fl7 39 



Parlez Fran^ ais 
With Your Comp 

FOREIGN-LANGUAGE SOFIAA/ARE 
CAN HELP YOU MINIMIZE 
FAUX PAS WHILE TRAVELING 
ABROAD 



BY ANN E. LAFORGE 

You might dream of the thrill 
and glamour of vacationing 
in a foreign land. But, if you 
don't know the language, your dream 
can turn to a nightmare. The sim- 
plest tasks — making a phone call, 
getting directions, or ordering food — 
all too easily become exercises in 
frustration. 

During one trip to Germany, my 
husband, Christopher, and I went to 
a lovely restaurant for dinner. We 
chose an appetizer called "press- 
kopf." because the only other choice 
was pate, which neither of us relish- 
es. "What could it be?" I asked Chris- 
topher as we eagerly awaited our 
meal. "I don't know," he replied, "but 
'kopr means 'head' in German. " We 
laughed. The waiter brought the 
plates and there, in a slithering 
mass, was headcheese, a jellied loaf 
made from the head and feet of a pig. 
Not our cup of tea. 

Another time, while driving From 
Germany to Luxembourg to catch our 
plane to the United States, Christo- 
pher and 1 decided to cut through 
France. We turned onto the French 
highway, and the strange signs 
meant nothing to us. But one sign 
that said "peage" appeared so fre- 
quently that we began to speculate 
about its meaning. 

Then it dawned on us: Peage is one 
of those foreign words that sounds 
like what it means in English. You 
might translate it as "pay-us." We 
were driving on a French toll-high- 
way with nothing but German 
Deutschmarks in our pockets! 

Determined never again to have to 
explain a dilemma in sign language 
to a sjTnpathetic but baffled and non- 
English-speaking toll-taker, or, for 




ANN E. LAFORGE IS a freelance writer living 
In New York. 



40 FAMILY COMPUTING 



that matter, destroy a meal because 
we can't understand the menu — we 
decided to bone up on vocabulary be- 
fore our next trip to France. 

The trouble was deciding how we 
could best reawaken the French we 
had learned in high school 10 years 
before. We didn't have time to take 
language classes; we had tried tapes 
in the past with little success: and we 
knew that flipping through old text- 
books would be a lost cause. 

1 had read that foreign-language 
software was available for computers, 
so I decided that it was time to use 
our trusty Apple lie for something be- 
sides word processing. A few months 
before our vacation departure date, 
we began searching for appropriate 
software. 



SETTING A COURSE OF STUDY 

After considering a wide range of 
titles, we narrowed down our course 
of study to four main programs: Ba- 
taUle de Mots (Gesslcr Educational 
Software), a four-part vocabulary- 
building program adapted from the 
popular Word Attache game by David- 
son & Associates; French Llnkword 
(Artworx). a vocabulary, grammar, 
and pronunciation program that 
links foreign words to acoustically 
similar English words to provide 
easy-to-remember visual associa- 
tions: Mesaventnres Culturelles 
(Gessler), a fun and simple program 
that includes 12 mini-dramas illus- 
trating common cross-cultural mis- 
understandings; and Tickets to Paris 
(Blue Lion Software), a travel Simula- 



FOREIGN-LANGUAGE SOFTWARE 



Pvblislieir 



Artwora Software 

(7161385-6120 

(8001 828-6573 (oulslde NV) 



Ltnkword 



Brief Description 



Learn a foreign language by 
linking the foreign words with 
English words that sound 
similar. Audiotape Included. 



languages 



Price Coiapwlers 



Dutch. French 
German, Greek. 
Kalian. Portuguese. 
Russian, Spanish 



S25-S30 Amiga. Apple II series. 

Atari. Atari ST. C 64/128. 
IBM PC/PCjr & compatibles, 
and Macintosh 



Blue Lion Software 
(617) 876-2500 



Ttcfcel lo Paris Software travel simulation game 

that teaches French while you 
learn French culture. 



French 



S30.S40 Apple II series. C 64/128. 
and IBM PC/PCjr & 
compatibles 



Control Data 
1612) 921-6805 



Classroom Words 
Trat'cf Vocabulary 
Vocabulary Builder 
Creaie-A- Vocabulary 
Vocabulary Jbr 
Sfiopping 



Five-part series for each foreign French, S40.S50 Apple lIr/1 1 Plus and IBM PC 

language. German, Spanish 6c compatibles 



EMC Publishing 
1612) 771-1555 



Let's Praellce (Lessons Features cultural simulations. 



1-3} 



grammar tutorial, and drills that 
leach colloquial and formal 
lanjiuagc. 



French, German, 
Italian. 
Portuguese. 
Russian. Spanish 



S40;S105 
for all 
three 
lessons 



Apple Ile/Hc 



Gessler Educational 

Software 

(2121 673-3113 



Baialile de Mols 
Worigefechi 
Balalla de Palabra 



Teaches vocabularj' for food, 
school, sports, and travel. 



French, 
German, Spanish 



S50 Apple 11 series, C 64/128, 

and 1I3M PC/PCjr & 
compatibles 



French Micro Scrabble Built-in 20.000-word vocabulary. 



English, S38-S40 Apple 11 series. C 64/128. 

French IBM PC/PC/r & compatibles, 

and Macintosh 



La Carie de France 



E.\plorc culture, geograpliy. and 
hlstor>- of France. 



French 



S40 



Apple 11 series 



La Guntoiine 

La Corrida dc Toros 



Learn hundreds of words In this 
vocabulary' review. 



French, Spanish $30 



Apple II series. C 64/128. 
IBM PC/PCjr & compatibles, 
and Tandy Models I/11I/4 



Mesaventures 
Cuttureltes 



Reveals French-English 
differences and similarities. 



French 



S30 



Apple II series and Tandy 
Models I/lil/4 



Learning Well by Mlndscape Banqiie de Mots 
(312) 480-7667 Banco de Palabras 



Review over 1 .300 vocabulary 
words. 



French, Spanish $50 



Apple II series 



Jeux de Vocabulaire 
Juegos de Vocabulano 



Reinforce word associations for 
over 1 ,000 words. 



French, Spanish S50 



Apple II series 



Roger Wagner Publishing 
(619) 562 3670 



Spanish for the 
Traveler 



Learn practical Spanish for 
dining, shopping, and touring. 



Spanish 



S60 



Apple II series and IBM PC/ 
PCjr & compatibles 



tion game that teaches French lan- 
guage and culture. 

While the cost of a few good for- 
eign-language programs approached 
the fee for taking a six- or 12- 
week course, the computerized les- 
sons offered many advantages: Chris- 
topher and 1 could both learn French; 
we could "attend class" at our own 
convenience; and the learning wasn't 
over after 1 2 lessons. 

Thanks to our computer language 
course, we felt more confident than 
we ever had before while traveling in 
a foreign country. I found myself bet- 
ter able to understand signs, commu- 
nicate simple needs, and make edu- 
cated guesses about word meanings 
when I was really stumped. 1 even 
tried conversations that I would nor- 
mally never attempt in a foreign 
tongue, such as asking for extra tow- 
els, complaining when 1 was short- 
changed, and engaging in small talk, 

STEPS TO SUCCESS 

Anyone can bone up on a language 
with the help of a computer. But 
whether you're learning French, 
Spanish, Italian, German, Swedish, 
or even Greek, it takes time, pa- 
tience, organization, and dedication 
to get the most out of the software 
you buy. Based on my own experi- 



ence, I suggest these seven steps to 
success: 

1. Choose a variety of programs. 
Many of the programs on the market 
are basic driU-and-practice routines, 
which can become extremely tedious. 
In addition, no one program docs 
everything. Some are very good at 
helping you memorize, some are good 
at (drilling you, and others are good at 
pointing out masculine and feminine 
nouns and accent marks. 

2. The most important thing to re- 
member when buying the software is 
to be realistic about your skill level. If 
youVe never had any exposure to the 
language, don't choose a program de- 
signed for intermediate level, 

3. Set a specific schedule for work- 
ing with your foreign-language soft- 
ware, and strive to stick with it. You'll 
get the best results if you set aside a 
block of time — at least half an hour — 
to work with the software every day. 

4. Concentrate on the vocabulary 
sections that will most directly affect 
you as a traveler: food, transporta- 
tion, shopping, geography, etc. 

5. Whenever possible, get someone 
else to work with you at the comput- 
er. Once or twice a week, Christopher 
and 1 would sit down and work on a 
program together. After a few weeks, 
we even tried a little two-way conver- 



sation in French. Of course, we fum- 
bled along. But 1 figured that if I 
couldn't bring myself to practice 
French in front of my husband in my 
own home, I'd never open my mouth 
in France. 

6. Don't expect more than the com- 
puter can realistically give. While a 
computer can be an interesting tool 
for learning a foreign language, it will 
not guarantee fluency in whatever 
you study. How much you learn will 
depend on how willing you arc to 
spend time working with the soft- 
ware and practicing. 

7. Also, if you're using the software 
to learn a language that you've never 
been exposed to before, you should be 
aware of the system's inherent limita- 
tions. No matter how good your ma- 
chine's sound capability is. the com- 
puter can't speak to you with a 
flawless foreign accent, nor can it 
correct your attempts to sound au- 
thentic. 

Without a doubt, the most impor- 
tant benefit of having boned up on 
French with the help of my computer 
was not in conversation but in com- 
prehension. I found that this time in 
Europe, when people stood before me 
speaking excitedly and gesturing 
wildly, I could figure out exactly what 
I was doing wrong! tSl 



MAY 1987 41 



NEW HARDWARE 

AAACINTOSH II AND AAACINTOSH SE 
Color, Slots, and an MS-iX)S Option 



These are product previews — not re- 
views — based on press injormation 
and a day spent viewing ihe ma- 
chines at Apple headquarters. 

Apple recently unveiled two new 
Macintosh models, and one has 
everything "Macophiles" have been 
chanting for: color, expansion slots, 
a bigger screen, more speed, and the 
potential to run IBM software. Like 
the new Amiga 2000 (see April's 
New Hardware], the new Macintosh 
II is a fast, glitzy, graphics-oriented 
machine with the old-fashioned 
open architecture that made the Ap- 
ple 11 and IBM PC so successful. 

The Macintosh SE (System Expan- 
sion) is not nearly so radical. Its ba- 
sically a Macintosh Plus with an ex- 
pansion slot, plus the space for two 
internal dislt drives. 

With the two new Macintoshes, 
Apple can now talk about its com- 
puters the way Chevrolet talks about 
its cars. Apple sees the Macintosh 
512K and Macintosh Plus as "entry- 
level" machines; the Macintosh SE is 
a "mainstream" product, and the 
Macintosh II is a "high-performance" 
machine. 

MACINTOSH II 

Apple expects that the Macintosh 
11 will run most existing Macintosh 
software, as well as new high-perfor- 
mance software that takes advantage 
of its new microprocessor. 

The Macintosh II uses the Motor- 
ola 68020 microprocessor, the next 
step up from the Motorola 68000 
used in all the other Macintoshes, 
Amigas, and Atari STs. 

Besides the main chip, the Macin- 
tosh II has a Motorola 68881 arith- 
metic co-processor, which speeds 
mathematical calculations and gen- 
erates graphics on the screen much 
more quickly. 

In a break with the original Macin- 
tosh design, the Us monitor sits 
atop the system unit but is not con- 
nected to it. In fact, the new system 
is rather bulky and has much the 
same shape as an IBM AT! 

The Apple RGB color unit mea- 
sures 13 inches diagonally and dis- 
plays a very sharp image. However, 
it has 69 dots per inch, compared 
with 72 dots per inch on Macin- 




Mere VersiQn r.;c(Living Videotexl) shows oH 
the color capabiEitjr of the Macinlesh II. 



tosh's standard 9-inch black-and- 
white screen. But the difference in 
display should be imperceptible, 
even when you are running software 
designed for the older screen. 

The screen resolution of 640 x 480 
(the same on both color and mono- 
chrome monitors) provides higher 
resolution than the EGA monitors 
for MS-DOS machines. Both color 
and monochrome monitors require a 
video card installed in one of the six 
expansion slots. 

Another big improvement in the 



MACINTOSH SE FACTS 

PRICE, S2, 898-83,698, depending on op- 
tions 

MKMOKY: 1-lVIB RAM, expandable to 4 MB 
internally; 256K ROM 
^URIm'ARl! INCLUDED: System unit with 9- 
incii black-and-white monitor built in; 
keyboard; two 800 K 3. 5 -inch disk drives 
or one 800K 3.5-inch and one 20-MB 
SCSI hard-disk drive: mouse 
INTERFACES: Two Serial ports. SCSI inter- 
face: sound port for external amplifier: 
two keyboard/mouse connectors 

EXPASSLON SLOTS: One 

SCKEEN D1SFL.W: 512 X 342 plxels. black 

and white 

SOUND: Four-voice sound 



MACINTOSH II FACTS 

PRICE: 33,898-85,498, depending on op- 
tions 

MEMORY: l-MB RAM, expandable to 8 MB 
internally; 256K ROM 
HAKuwAUE INCLUDED: System unit (monitor 
sold separately); keyboard: two 800K 3.5- 
inch dislc drives and a 20-. 40-. or 80- 
megabyte hard-disk drive; mouse 
INTERFACES: Two Serial ports: SCSI port; 
two keyboard/mouse ports 

EXPANSION SLOTS: SiX 

SCREEN Drsi>ij\Y: 640 X 480, color or mono- 
chrome; up to 16 colors with standard 
video card: up to 256 with upgrade card 
SOUND: Four-voice stereo sound 



Macintosh II is the custom sound 
chip, which provides four-voice ste- 
reo output. Didier Diaz, product 
manager for the Macintosh II, says 
the sound chip is relatively self-suffi- 
cient, so developers will be able to 
enhance new programs with sound 
without making too many compro- 
mises. 

MACINTOSH SE 

The expansion slot on the SE — the 
primary improvement over the Mac- 
intosh Plus — should inspire a deluge 
of third-party add-ons. Accelerators, 
color video cards, and MS-DOS co- 
processors are expected in the first 
wave of new products. Unfortunate- 
ly, Apples color video cards for the 
Macintosh II won't work on the SE, 
but a color card from a third party 
can be expected. 

The Macintosh SE is about the 
same size as the Macintosh Plus, 
but the guts of the machine take up 
considerably less space. This com- 
pression leaves room for the expan- 
sion slot and a second internal disk 
drive, which can be a 3.5-inch 800K 
drive or a hard-disk drive. 

The SE also performs some tasks 
15-20 percent faster and transfers 
data through the SCSI port consid- 
erably faster than the Plus does, ac- 
cording to Apple. 

MS'DOS OPTION 

By adding disk-controller cards or 
co-processor cards, both Macin- 
toshes have the ability to read MS- 
DOS data files and/or run MS-DOS 
software- The controller card, which 
fits inside the machine, has a con- 
nector for an external MS-DOS drive. 
The co-processor card, however, con- 
tains a built-in controller card. 

To transfer MS-DOS flies to either 
machine, you will also need a specif- 
ic Macintosh software utility that 
will convert programs and files from 
MS-DOS to Macintosh format. 

To actually run MS-DOS pro- 
grams, such as Lotus 1-2-3, you 
must add either the 8086 (for the 
SE) or the 80286 (for the II) co-pro- 
cessor card. Apple will sell the con- 
troller cards and the utility software: 
a third party will sell the MS-DOS 
co-processor cards. Prices were not 
fbted at press time. — nick sullivak 



42 FAMILY COMPUITNG 



1 MHz Super Turbo IBM® XT 
iCompatible Computer System 

Run thousands of IBM® software programs ovailable. 




Look at all you get for only ^599 



Tho complete s ystem 

10 MHz Super Turbo XT Computer 

* 5 12K Memory 

* Single floppy disk drive 

* Parallel printer port 

* Serial printer port 

* Mouse/joystick port 

* RGB color graphics port 

* Hercules compatible monochrome port 
MS DOS 3.2 & GW Basic 

12" Hi-Res 35 MHz Green Screen Monitor 

(TTL & EGA compatible) 

Monitor interface cable 
Big Blue Printer 

RS 232 IBM to Big Blue cable 

2 rolls of paper 
Word First • Word Processor 
Data First • Data Base 
Calc First • Spreadsheet 



List Price 



Sale Price 



»12950° 


.49900 


1999s 


No extra cost 


*129'* 


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No extra cost 


S5995 


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i 1 9900 


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*249°° 


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Home & Business 

This IBM® XT compatible is perfect 
for your home and/or business uses. It 
makes life easier in more ways than 
you can imagine. Use the system for 
personal letters, form letters, address 
storage, listing valuables, figuring 
finances, school reports, business 
reports, calculations, business 
projections... the list can go on and on. 
With the addition of some of the 
thousands of software programs 
available for IBM® you can increase 
the capabilities of your system even 
further. A terrific home improvement, 
business enhancer, entertainment 
center & educational aid! 



*24" 
»] 9900 

s-] 995 

M9" 
$9900 

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•19" 
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•39'=' 
•39'* 
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Save over 
$07COO 



Total price when bought separately 



'2893 



85 



'892 



«5 



off 

sale prices! 

Complete System only '599 



Buil[-in ihe Super Turbo XT 



IBM £ .s the irademork of Internotionol Buslr^ess ViQchines Inc. ' 90 Pay Immediate Replacement Policy from Compuier Direct 



Shipping, Handling & Insurance Chargax and Information 

Add i35 C» for shipping, handling ond insuronce. Illinois residents please add 
6V,-/. soles tox. Add $70.00 for CANADA, PUERTO RICO, HAV^AIl, ALASKA and 
APO-FPO. All orders must be in U.S. dollars. Enclose Coshier Check. Money Order 
or Personal Check. Allow 1 4 days for delivery, 2 to 7 days for phone orders, 1 day 
express moil. Prices & Availability subject to change wilfiout notice. 
VISA - MASTIKARO ■ C.O.D. Pi«JW "11 iorCO.D, charges. 



COMPUTER DIRECT 

22292 N. Pepper Rd., Barrington, Illinois 60010 

Call (312) 382-5050 or 382-5244 

to Order We Love Our Customers, 



CIRCU READER SERVICE 30 



Famous ISatianal Brand 



NLQ 180 

Hi-Speed Printer Sale 

• 1 60 - 1 80 CPS • Near Letter Quality • 

Lifetime Warranty 




199 



60% OFF LIST PRICE 



Below 

Wholesale 

Cost Prices! 



$499.95 




All New up Front 
Panel Controls 



Fantastic Graphics 
Easy to Use 



Fantastic Price 



^^K^ 



NLO-ISO Premium Qualify Printer 

Near Letter Quality Selectable From Front 
Panel Controls • High Speed Dot Matrix* 
Letter Quality Modes • 8K Buffer frees up 
computer 4-times faster • Pica, Elite, 
Italics, Condensed • Super Graphics • 
Business or Personal • Tractor/Friction • 
15 Day Free Trial • Lifetime Warranty on 
Print Head* • 6 Month Immediate 
Replacement Policy • 







NLO-180 Print Samnles 




Th 


is is 


an ixaap 


le of ITALICS 


i^ 


r» h-» .SI 


n cz ^d 


Boldface 




Condensed Text 


Double 


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ample 


of Near 


Letter 


Qual ity 



APPLE — ATARI — EPSON 

Print Buffer 

8K bytes utility buffer 

Printing Direction 

Text Mode — Bi-directiona! 

Graphic Mode — Uni-directional 

Interface 

Centronics Parallel Port 

Paper 

Plain paper, Roll paper. Single sheet 

Fanfold, Multipart paper: max. 3 sheets 

(original plus 2 copies) 

Character Fonts 

Pica, Elite, Italics, Condensed 



NLQ 180 SPECiriCATIONS — ibm - commodore - etc. _ 



Printing Method 

Impact dot matrix 

Printing Speed 

1 60- 1 80 CPS at standard character printing 

Printing Characters 

Standard 9x9 dot matrix 
NLQ 12 X 18 dot matrix (33cps) 

Character size: 2. 12 x 2.8 mm (standard) 
Character sets: Full ASCII character set (96) 
32 International characters 



INTERrACES 



Ink Ribbon Cartridge 

Ribbon Life: 3 million characters/cartridge 
Physical Dimensions 
Size: 15"xl2"x5" 
Weight: 12.7 lbs. 

Maximum Number of Characters 

Standard: 10 cpi 80 cpl 

Standard enlarged: 5 cpi 40 cpl 

Elite: 12 cpi 96 cpl 

Elite enlarged: 6 cpi 48 cpi 

Condensed: 17 cpi 132 cpl 

Condensed enlarged: 8.5 cpi 66 cpl 

Condensed elite; 20 cpi 160 cpl 



Atari $39.95 Apple $44.95 Commodore $29.95 IBM $49.95 Laser 128 $19.95 Macintosh $49.95 



shipping, Handlln0 & Insurcincs Charges 

Add $10.00 fo<- shipping, hondling. and insurance. Illinois residents please add 
6V, % sales tox. Add $20.00 for ALASKA, CANADA. HAWAII. PUERTO RICO & 
APO-FPO orders. All orders must be in U.S. Dollars. WE DO NOT EXPORT TO 
OTHER COUNTRIES EXCEPT CANADA « PUERTO RICO. Enclose cashier check, 
money order or personal check. Allow H days for delivery. 2 to 7 days for phone 
orders, 1 day express mail. Prices £ Avoilability subject to change without notice. 
VISA — MASTER CARD — C.O.D. Coll For C.O.D. Chafges. 



COMPUTER DIRECT 

22292 N. Pepper Rd., Barrrngton, Illinois 60010 

Call (312) 382-5050 or 382-5244 

to Order We Love Our Customers 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 31 



Complete Applet Compatible 

Word Processing System 

• 15 Day Free Trial • 90 Day Immediate Replacement Policy • 

Home • Business • School • Word Processing 




Look At All You Get for only $499.00 



Laser 128 Apple Compatible Computer 

Big Blue Printer 

12" 35 MHz Hi-Resolution Monitor 

Magic Window He wordprocessor 

Magicalc Spreadsheet 

Magic Memory Data Base 

Laser 128 Big Blue Printer Interface 

2 Rolls of Heat Transfer Paper 

Comparable Apple System ($2495.00) 

Magic Window lie: Word processing is 
easy and more efficient because of a 
simple-to-read menu system and editing 
commands. Many powerful features of 
professional quality programs and 
more. Supports virtually all major 
primer functions. Operates with most 80 
column video cards or 40/70 column 
no-hardware modes. 



List Price 


Sale Price 


$499.00 


S395.00 


199.00 


39.95 


229.95 


99.00 


150.00 


49.95 


150.00 


49.95 


60.00 


39.95 


19.95 


12.95 


19.95 


5.95 


S1327.85 


$692.70 




Over 



$7Q0OO 



Off List Prices 



All 8 Pieces Only $499 



Magicalc: Rated as the best electronic 
spreadsheet on the market for Apple. 
The speed with which Magicalc solves 
number problems allows you to 
accurately analyze decisions 
beforehand. Supports multiple RAM 
cards of most manufacturers in any 
combinations up to a full 512 K. 

Apple® is iKe regiiferod trademark p( Apple Compulera Inc 



Magic Memory: File anything, any way 
you want to: names, addresses, 
important numbers, dates and notes. 
Your information is organized siinply, 
easy to maintain, and available 
instantly. Supports all popular printers 
and video cards. 



Shipping, Handling & Iniuronce Charge* and Information 

Add (35.00 for shippirtg. handling and insuronce. Illinoii residents please odd 
6'/,*/. tolas (OK. Add $70,00 for CANADA. PUERTO RICO, HAWAII. ALASKA, and 
APOFPO, WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES EXCEPT CANADA S 
PUERTO RICO. All order! must be in U.S. dollors. Enclose Coifiier Cfieck. Money 
Order or Personal Check. Allow 14 days (or delivery, 2 to 7 days for phone orders, 
1 day express mail. Prices & Avoilobility subject to cfian9e without notice. 
VISA - MASTERCABO - C.O.D. Please Call for C.O.D. Charges 



COMPUTER DIRECT 

22292 N. Pepper Rd., Barrington, Illinois 60010 

Call (312) 382-5050 or 382-5244 

to ©rdCf We Love Our Customers 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 32 



SOFTWARE GUIDE 

Welcome to FAMILY COMPUTING'S Software Guide, the most comprehensive listing available of tv^/o 
dozen of the nev^^est, most noteworthy, and/or best programs on the market. Our reviewers include 
families from all over the country who hove judged the software according to the following crite- 
ria: long-term benefits and applications, adaptability, and advantages of using a computer for a 
given task. Programs have been evaluated and rated for their performance in each of the catego- 
ries listed below. More detailed reviews follow the chart. Unless otherwise noted, all programs ore 
in disk format, and minimum memory requirements are 48K for Apple 11 series, 48K for Atari, 
128K for IBM PC/PC/r or compatibles, and 128K for Macintosh. "Atari" alone denotes the 800/XL/XE 
series. "C 64/128" means the software will run on both a C 64 and a C 1 28 computer in C-64 
mode; "C 128" alone means the software will run only on that machine. 

Here's a rundown of the rating categories and what they mean: O = Overall performance, giv- 
en the limitations and capacities of the particular computer for which the software is intended. P 
= Documentation, or the instructions and literature that accompany a program. EH = Error-han- 
dling, the software's capacity to accommodate errors mode by the user — on especially important 
consideration with software for younger users. PS = Play system {in the games reviews), the 
quality of the game design and the game's playability. GQ = Graphics quality, also evaluated in 
light of each particular brand's graphics capabilities. EU = Ease of use after the initial learning 
period, which varies from computer to computer. V = Value for money, or how the software mea- 
sures up to its price. 


EDUCATION/FUN LEARNING 


Title 

Publisiier 

Price 


Brief 
description 


Hardware/ 
Equipment 
required 


Backup 
policy 


O 


Ratings 
D I EHjGQ 


EU 


V 


FIRST SHAPES 
First Byte, Inc. 
2845 Temple Ave. 
Long Beacti, CA 90806 
(213)595-7006 
S50 ©1986 


Activities for youngsters (ages 3- 
8) that talk. Includes shape 
matching, building on-screen 
toys, and a memory game. Also 
teaches the names of shapes and 
the concepts of larger and small- 
er. Lots of fun. + —SUMMERS 


Reviewed on 512K 
Amiga. Also for Apple 
lies. Atari ST. C 64/ 
128, 512K Macintosh. 


90-day 

warranty. $15 
for backup. 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 


* 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


E 


* 
* 
* 


SEE THE U.S.A. 

Compu-Teach Inc. 

78 Olive St. 

New Haven. CT065n 

(203) 777-7738 

S60O1986 


Players crisscross the country to 
learn the names of states and 
their capitals, mottos. flowers, 
and other facts. The quiz games 
are enjoyable; best for ages 6-10. 
Parents might need to help Iheir 
kids, though. —frank 


64K Apple. 2nd drive. 


90-day 

warranty. Not 
copy-protected. 


* 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


A 


* 
* 


STICKYBEAR READING 

COMPREHENSION 

Weekly Reader Family 

Software 

245 Long Hill Road 

Middlctown, CT 06457 

(203) 638-2400 

$40 ©1986 


Children can choose to read 
more than 30 interesting stories 
at various reading levels: then 
they answer multiple-choice 
questions. But the workout for- 
mat is somewhat static— It's no 
different than reading programs 
I used five years ago. For ages 8- 

I 1 . — SITTHERLAND 


Apple. 


90-day 

warranty. SlO 
for backup. 


* 
* 


* 
* 


* 


* 
* 


E 


* 


TALKING TEXT WRITER 
Scholastic Software 
730 Broadwav 
New York, NY" 10003 
(212)505-3501 
8250 ©1986 


By making the word processor 
talk with synthesized speech, 
children get both visual and au- 
ditory feedback that helps them 
improve language skills. Package 
includes the speech synthesiz- 
er. + -SOLOMON 


128K Apple lle/IIc/llGS. 
Echo + or Cricket. 
Color monitor, printer 
optional. 


60-day 

warranty. $10 
for 10 months 
thereafter. 


* 
* 


* 
* 


* 
* 


N/A 


A 


* 
* 


THE TOY SHOP 

Brodcrbund Software 

17 Paul Drive 

San Rafael, CA 94903 

(415)479-1170 

S60-S65 ©1986 


Create startlingly detailed print- 
outs of parts to construct 20 dif- 
ferent models— airplanes, cars, 
engines, even a working scale 
and a mechanical bank. Once 
you've completed all the models, 
though, there's nothing more to 

do. —MORRIS 


Reviewed on 64K Apple. 
Also for C 64/128, IBM 
PC/PCjr,' Macintosh. 
2nd drive. Joystick 
recommended. 


90-day 

warranty. S7.50 
thereafter. SlO 
for backup. 


* 
* 


* 


* 
* 


* 


r« 


* 


Wnmoa kit O overall perrgrmance: P Doctimemallon: IH Error-handling: QQ Graphics qualily: IV Ease of use: ¥ Value tor manev; O Poor: * Avcrasc: ** Good: 
*** Vm' Good; **** Exctllenl: N'A Noi applicable: E Easy: A Avcraift; D Dlfflcull: m Easy lo dlflkull. depending on model: * Longer review follows ehan 
•Tllles listed Tor ihe IBM PCPCjr a-ill also run on many IB.VI FC compatibles; owing lo the prohferallon orcompallblcs. check with the publisher ol the program or your dealer forrompallbllily. 



46 FAMILY COMPUTING 




uPi 



s^ 





Algiblaslei 


27,8S 


Am«rican Challenge 


24.39 


ASC II Eipres: 


74.39 


Balance of Power 


33.39 


Bank Slreel Wriler • 


se.39 


Bfeakers 


!6,89 


Cenilicale Maker 


41.89 


Library Vol. 1 


19.39 


dBastlll* 


4i9,99 


Dollars i Sense 


104,39 


Easy 


eB.39 


FllghlSim 


28.49 


Fofllrii 


38.39 


Fonlasy 


4S.I9 


Fntpks 1 Ihiu 13 


ea. 13.S9 


Framework 11 


419.B9 


Fully Powertii PC 


24.(9 


Gamecard III 


39.19 


Galo 


21.69 


Hacker 1 or II 


24,89 


Helical Ace 


24.B9 


Jel 


31,49 


King's Quesl 1 or II 


31,19 


Load Runner 


22,19 


Locksmith 


56,89 


Loius 


319,69 


Mean 16 


34,69 


Mngng Yr Money 


114,89 


Nlc:o Cookbook 


27,89 


Microsoll Word 


279.03 


Multiplan 


110.89 


Newsroom Pra 


74.19 


Hmcn Utililies 


38.19 


Option Board 


79.19 


PC Tools 


18.19 


PFS: Access 


S9.19 


PFS: Flies Froles, 


UB.Bi 


PFS: First Choice 


104.19 


PFS: Plan Proles. 


148.69 


PfS: W;ilc Proles. 


148.89 


Print Stiop 


34,89 



Print Shop Companion 32,89 



Print Strop Gr, =1 
Retlei Database 
Report Card 
Sidekick 

Sideways Ver, ^ 
Silent Service 
Spee:Ikey 
SuperCalc 4 
Supefkey 
Symphony 
Think Tank 
Toy Shop 
Traveling 5ide)dck 
TurtMj Database TIbz 
Turbo Lighting 
Turbo Pascal 3.0 
Turbo Prolog 
Turbo Tutor 
Ullima III 
Visable 8088 
Volkswriler Oil --3 
Web, Spell Checker 
Wizardry 
Word Peneet 
Wordstar 20OO- 



21,89 
68.89 
32,69 
SO,89 
33.89 
22.89 
104.39 
279.89 
40.39 
494.39 
99.39 
48,39 
40.39 
40.39 
S8.39 
59.39 
18.19 
23.39 
40.39 
47.89 
141.W 
39.19 
36.89 
289.00 
264.69 



■P:^ 



co 



l^^ 



IBM 

APPLE 

COMMODORE 



APPLE SOFTWARE 



APPLE SOnWARE 



Adv. Construction 
Airhearl 
Algeblaster 
Alpha Plot 
ASC II Express 
Auto Works 
Bag of Tricks 2 
Bank Street Filer 
Bank Street Mailer 
Bank Street Writer 
Bank Street Speller 
Bard's Tale 
Beagle Bag 
Beagle Basic 
Beagle Compiler 
Beagle Graphics 
Beneath Apple DOS 
BigU 
Bookends 
Bop t Wrestle 
Breakers 

Captain Goodnight 
Carmen Sandiego 
Certificate Maker 

Library Vol. 1 
Chart n Graph Tlb> 
Classmates 
Database Toolbox 
Dante Draw 
D'Code 
DiskQuick 
Dollars I; Sense 
005 Boss 
OoublC'Take 
£ldi*on 

Essef^lial Data Dtjp 
EntraK 
Fantavisfon 
Fat Cat 
Rex Type 
Fontrrx 1,1 

Fr^tpks t thru 15 es 
Font Works 
Forecast 
Frame-Up 
Galo 
01 Joe 

Graphics Department 
Graphic Magician 
Graphwortts 
GPLE 

Handler Package 
Impossible Mission 
1.0. Silner 
Jeeves 
Karaleka 

Knight 01 Diamonds 
Kid Wnter 
King's Quest I or D 
Koronis Rilt 
Legacy of Llytgam^ 
List Handler 
Locksmith 
Macroworks 
P/ngng Yr Money 
Megaworks 
Merlin 
Merlin Pro 
Merlin Combo 
Micro Cookbook 
Millionaire 
Minipli 1,2 or 3 



33.69 
22.69 
27,89 
20,89 
74.89 
25,89 
31,69 
42,69 
42,69 
42.89 
42.69 
39.69 
16.69 
13,69 
41.69 
30.69 
12,89 
13.49 
63.99 
13,89 
23.69 
22.69 
25.89 
29.89 
19.69 
23.89 
27.39 
23.39 
37.89 
20.39 
15.89 
71.39 
12.39 
16.49 
24.39 
27,39 
20.39 
31.89 
18.49 
15.49 
53.19 
13.19 
33.89 
37.19 
15.49 
21.19 
24.19 
28.89 
25.19 
44.89 
25.89 
86.69 
24,89 
15,19 
28,69 
22,19 
25,19 
24,19 
31,19 
24,69 
26,69 
36,69 
33,69 
13,69 
93,39 
59,69 
41,39 
64,39 
63,89 
27,89 
31,89 
11,49 



Mcebius 

Mouse Talk 

MouseWrlte 

Munch-A-Bug 

NATO Commander 

PfS: Plan 

PfS: Write 

PFS: File 

Piece at Cake Malti 

Pinpoint 

Prince 

Print ographer 

Prinlmaster 

Print Shop 

PrtShpGr, 1,2,3or4 

Print Shop Companion 

Probyter 

Pronto DOS 

Program Writer 

Power Print 

Quicken 

Report Card 

Rescue an Fractalus 

fleportworks 

Rescue Raiders 

Science tool kit 

Sensible Grammar 

Sensible Speller 

Shape Mechanic 

Sideways 

Silicon Salad 

Skyloi 

Spellwortts 

Springboard Publisher 

Star IHeel I (Flight| 

Sticky Bear ABC 

Car Builder 

Drawing 

Math 1 or 2 

Math Word Prob. 

Music 

Numbers 

Printer 

Reading 

Rd. Compretiension 

Speilgrabber 

Townbuilder 

Typing 
Summer Games I or II 
Super Macrowoiks 
Terrapin Logo 
Think Tank 
Thinkwofks 
Tip Osk '1 
Toy Shop 
Transylvania 
Trinity 
Trip^Oump 
Turbo Database Tlbx 
Turbo Pascal 3.0 
Turbo Tutor 
Type 
Ullima IV 
Understanding HE 
Utility Oly 
Video Toolbox 
Visable 8502 
Wilderness 
Wizardry 
Wiiards Toolbox 
WIzprint 
Word Handler 
Word Perfect 
World's Grist FlbaTI 
Write Choice 



40.69 
69.69 
83.69 
23.69 
22.69 
75.69 
75.69 
75.69 
23.89 
43.89 
43.69 
23.89 
27.89 
31.69 
15.89 
24.89 
11.49 
15.49 
33.39 
20,39 
34.89 
32,39 
24,39 
59.39 
21,39 
44.39 
51.39 
66,89 
20.39 
36,39 
12.39 
27,39 
29,39 
94.39 
33.89 
22.39 
23.39 
22.39 
22.39 
22.39 
22.39 
22.39 
22.39 
22.39 
22.19 
22.89 
22.19 
22.89 
24.19 
32.89 
33.89 
79.19 
59.19 
10.69 
36.69 
13.69 
24.19 
20.69 
44.89 
44.89 
21.89 
28.89 
40,89 
17,89 
15,49 
23,69 
31,75 
34,6) 
31,6) 
23,6) 
16,69 
36,69 
84,6) 
24,89 
24,89 



■ SILICON EXPRESS 



5955 E. Main St. Columbus, Ohio 43213 
1-614-868-6868 



Aerojet 


22,6) 


Air Rescue 1 


24,6) 


Bards Tale 


30,8) 


Ballbia^er 


24,6) 


Back to Basics 


134,6) 


Bank Street Storybook 


27,69 


Bank Street Spelter 


34,6) 


Bank Street Wrter 


34,6) 


Basic Toolkit 


29,69 


Blazing Peddles 


24.6) 


Borrowed Time 


20.6) 


Carmen Sandiego 


22.6) 


Certilicate Maker 


29.69 


Color Me 


20.6) 


Cntdwn to Shtdwn 


20.6) 


Fast Tracks 


20.6) 


Galo 


20.69 


Gertrude's Secrets 


20.6) 


GlJoe 


24,6) 


Graphics Magiciarv 


27,69 


Gri Amer Road Rice 


19,6) 


hacker 


20,6) 


Jet 


27,6) 


Jet Combat Simulator 


20,6) 


Karateka 


22,6) 


Kennedy Approach 


24,6) 


Kung Fu 


20,69 


Little Comp, People 


24,B) 


Malt Order Monsters 


24,69 


Merlin 


34,69 


Mig Alley Ate 


24,89 


Multiplan 34/126 


43,69 


Nato Commander 


22,89 


Paper Clip 


41,69 


Print Shop 


29,69 


Pnnt Shop Comp, 


21,89 


Pr, SflopGr, 1,!,or3 


15,69 


Rescue on Fractalus 


24,89 


Scrabble 


27.69 


Siifeways 


2C.89 


Silent Service 


22.89 


Spitlire Ace 


20.89 


Spreadsheet 


34.89 


Sticky Sear ABC 


20,89 


Numbers 


20,89 


Opposites 


20.39 


Shapes 


20.39 


Summer Games i or II 


24.89 


Temple of Apsiiai Tnl. 


24.39 


Toy Shop 


3)39 


Translormers 


24.39 


World Games 


24.39 


World's Gnsi Bsbail 


24.39 


Worid's Gnsi Fiball 


24.39 



Ballyhoo 

Clip An (Vol 1 or 3( 

Clip An (Vol 2| 

Copy II • 

Crossword Magic 

Crusade in Europe 

Cullhroals 

Early Games 

Easy as ABC's 

Enchanter 

Family Roots 

Fraction Factory 

F'ISStnke Eagle 

Graphics Expander 

Ghost Busters 

Hitchhiker's Guide 

Leather Goddesses 

Load Runner 

Magic Spells 

Mastertype 

Math Blaster 

Micro Lg. Baseball 

Micro Lg. Manager 

Micro Lg. Team 

Mind Forever Voy, 

Music Conslruction 

Newsroom 

One-On-One 

Pitstop II 

Plenettall 

Reader Rabbit 

Sargon ill 

Sal (Harcon Brace) 

Sorcerer 

Speed Reader it 

Speltbreaker 

Spell It 

Starcross 

Star Trek I or It 

Suspect 

Tass Times 

Ultima III 

Temple ol Apshai Tn 

Trinity 

Typing Tutor III 

Will Writer 

Winter Games 

Wishbnnger 

Witness 

Word Attack 

Wodd's Grist Ssbalt 

ZorkI 

Zork II or III 

Zork Trilogy 



24.39 
1)39 
24.39 
19.39 
31.39 
24.39 
24.39 
20.39 
21.39 
24.39 
149.39 
19.39 
22.39 
24,39 
24,39 
24,39 
24,39 
22,39 
25,39 
26,39 
27,39 
24,39 
24,39 
13,39 
24,39 
12,39 
34,39 
12.39 
24,39 
24,39 
24,89 
31,39 
27,39 
27,89 
31,39 
30,39 
27,39 
30,39 
27.39 
27.39 
24.39 
40.39 
24.39 
24.39 
31.39 
26.39 
24.39 
24.39 
24,39 
27.19 
24.19 
24.19 
27.19 
46.19 



"^ HARDWARE 


CompuServe Starter 


24,89 


Datacase 


7.39 


Disk Notcher 


J.39 


Fllp^^•File 


10.39 


Lemon 


2789 


Lime 


46.89 


APPLE HARDWARE 


6DCol.64KCard(IIE 


49.19 


Apple Cat II 


114.19 


Disk Drive Coni 


47.00 


Disk Drive fti Tech 


119.19 


Gibson Light Pen 


146.00 


Grappter Buttered 


116.19 


GrapplerPro 


74.19 


Grappter (serial) 


74.19 


Grappter C 
Hot fink 


74.19 


44.19 


Kraft Joystick HE IIC 


23.69 


Koala Pad ■ 


;6.69 


Laser 123 Computer 


319.00 


Mach II Joystick 


26.69 


Mach III Joystick 


34.89 


Mach IV Joystick 


59.89 


Micromoden HE 


139.69 


Mockingboard A or B 


64,89 


Mockingboard C 


114.89 


MulliramCX512K 


174.00 


Multiram HE 80/64K 


119.00 


Mouse House 


7.4) 


Mouse Mat 


6.49 


Paddle slicks 


23.50 


Parallel Printer Card 


44.69 


Prometheus t200A 


251.8) 


Prtnt-ll 


122.6) 


Ramlaclor512K 


219,69 


Ramlador 1 MEG 


289,89 


Ramworks 64K 


139,89 


Ramworks 512K 


199,69 


Ramworks 1 MEG 


269,69 


Super Serial Card 


63,89 


System Saver Fan 
Thunder Clock 


58,89 


109.89 


Wildcard II 


74,89 


ZEE 80A Checkmate 


54,89 


Zoom HE 


102,89 



PRINTERS 

Citizen 120D 

Star LVt 210 

StarNX-IO 

Printer Stand 

OkidUa162P 

Okimate 20 

Printer Ribbons 
Imagewriier Black 
Imagewriler Color 
ImagewrHer II Color 

Color Paper Pack 

Print Shop Relilt 

MONITORS 

Magnavox Monitors 

Amdek Color 100 



174,39 
189.39 
249.39 
16.39 
229.19 
209.39 
CALL 
4.49 
4.99 
11.99 
12.89 
12.89 

CALL 
414,99 



SILICON EXPRESS 

5955 E. Main St. Columbus, Ohio 43213 



Name. 



Address_ 
City, 



. State . 



-3p. 



Charge t . 



. Exp. Date . 



QTY, 


DESCRIPTION 


PRICE 




















nompiitfir Typfi SHIPPING 




Phnnn Nn TOTAL 





Afld S3 00 fflin US. shipping. COD S5 00 extra Hawaii artd Alaska S4 gb min Orders 
outsiflD U S are noi insured Canada & Vexico 10^ min SiODO All oiher counlries SS'.-s 
mm S30i30 MasterCard. Visa and scfiool ouf chase orders accepted Personal ciipcks allow 
3 weeks 5 5".'= safes tax tor Ofiio residents Deleclrve repiacJJd mlfiin 20 day's PO^-t Tesiockinq 
lee il not leplaced witfi saime item. Campal^b^lltv not guaranieed Pnces subie^:! lo change 
wiinoul no:ice 




CIRCLE READER SERVICE 37 



HOME BUSINESS & PRODUCTIVITY { 


Title 

Publisher 

Price 


Brief 
descriplien 


Hardware/ 
Equipment 
required 


Backup 
policy 


O 


Ratings 

D|EH|CQ 


EU 


V 


AUTOWORKS 

The Software Touch 

9625 Black Mountain Rd. 

San Diego. CA 92126 

(6191549-3091 

S50 ©1986 


Adds new power to AppleWorks. 
such as a mail-merge function, 
macros to speed repetitive work, 
and mouse capabilities for the 
word processor, data base, and 
spreadsheet. + — kovacs 


128K Apple I!e/llc/IlGS. 
AppleWorks. Mouse 
optional. 


Sold as is. Not 
copy-protected. 


* 

* 


* 


* 
* 


N/A 


A 


* 
* 
* 


CLICKART PERSONAL 

PUBLISHER 

Software Publishing Corp. 

1901 Landings Drive 
Mountain View, CA 94043 
(415)962-8910 
$129 ©1986 


Capable desktop publishing 
package that works with dol-ma- 
trbc printers. Handsome Macin- 
tosh-like screens and simple 
command structure make page- 
layout fun. Slow speed limits It 
to short publications, though. 

— MORGENSTERN 


512KIBMPC.' 2nd 
drive, color graphics 
adapter. Mouse 
optional. 


90-day 

warranty. $15 
thereafter. Not 
copy-protected. 


* 
* 

A 


* 
* 


* 

* 
* 


* 
* 

* 


E 


* 
* 
* 


DELUXE VIDEO 
Electronic Arts 
1820 Gateway Drive 
San Mateo, CA 94404 
(415) 571-7171 
S100©1986 


Works with Electronic Arts' De- 
IwcePainl (to create visuals) and 
Instant Music (to create music 
and sound effects) to help you 
make videos. Watch them on- 
screen or record on videotape. 

— SUMMERS 


512KAmiga, 2nd drive 
recommended. 


90-day 

warranty. $7.50 
thereafter. 


* 

* 
* 
* 


* 

* 
* 


* 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


A 


* 
* 


FINANCIAL CONSULTANT 
Advanced Logic Systems 
1283 Reamwood Ave. 
Sunnyvale. CA 94089 
(408) 747-1988 
S90©!986 


A handy iittle package for finan- 
cial questions, such as calculat- 
ing loans, predicting IRA values, 
and doing break-even analysis. 
Can run as a stand-alone or as a 
memory-resident program. 

— SUMMERS 


IBM PC/PCjr.* 


90-day 

warranty. Not 
copy-protected. 


* 
* 


* 

* 
* 


* 


N/A 


E 


* 
* 


MACROWORKS 
Beagle Bros. Inc. 
3990 Old Town Ave. 
San Diego. CA92110 
(619) 296-6400 
835 ©1986 


An AppleWorks companion that 
features complete macro capabil- 
ities, greatly increasing its ease 
and speed of use. The package 
also comes with extras, such as 
a multiple-column printout func- 
tion. + — KOVACS 


128K Apple Ile/IIc/IlGS. 
AppleWorks, Mouse 
optional. 


30-day 

warranty. Not 
copy-protected. 


* 

■k 
* 


* 

* 


* 
* 
* 


N/A 


E 


* 
* 

* 


ON BALANCE 
Broderbund Software 

17 Paul Drive 

San Rafael, CA 94903 

(415)479-1170 

SlOO ©1986 


Home-finance software that dis- 
tinguishes itself through ease of 
use. Offers four kinds of reports, 
including net worth and transac- 
tions. 1 wish it had a financial 
calculation function, however. 

— MORGENSTERN 


128K Apple Ile/IIc. 2nd 
drive recommended. 
Mouse optional. 


90-day 

warranty. Not 
copy-protected. 


* 
* 


* 
* 

* 


* 

* 


• 


E 


* 


PFS: PROFESSIONAL 

WRITE 

Software Publishing Corp. 

(see above for address 

and phone) 

$199 01986 


Elegant yet easy word processor 
that Includes an excellent spell- 
ing checker, a thesaurus, and 
macro capability. You can learn 
It in less than an hour.f 

— MORGENSTERN 


320K IBM PC* 2nd 
drive. 


90-day 

warranty. S15 
thereafter. Not 
copy-protected. 


* 
* 


* 

* 


* 

* 
* 


N/A 


E 


* 

* 

* 


REGENT WORD 11 

Regent Software 

7131 Owensmouth. #45A 

Canoga Park, CA 91303 

(818)882-2800 

$100 ®1986 


Word processing with power and 
true user friendliness. But the 
manual is inadequate, and the 
program lends to lock up and 
stop working without warning. If 
the publishers improve it, how- 
ever, consider buying it, 

—BRADLEY 


Atari ST. 1040ST 
recommended. TOS in 
ROM. 


90-day 

warranty, SlO 
for backup. 


* 


* 


* 


N/A 


E 


* 


SILICON PRESS 
Silicon Beach Software 
P.O. Box 261430 
San Diego, CA 92126 
(619) 695-6956 
$80 ©1985 


Print mailing labels, business 
cards, invitations, tags, and lots 
more, Graphics can be copied 
from any appropriate Mac pro- 
gram. Text can be merged from 
a data base, too. Particularly 
good for small businesses. 

— MORRIS 


512K Macintosh. 


90-day 
warranty. $5 
thereafter. Not 
copy-protected. 


* 
■k 
* 
* 


* 
* 


* 
* 


* 
* 

* 


A 


■k 
* 


■ATlNeS KSY O Ovrrall ptrformanic: D Documtnlallon: IH Error-handling; OQ Graphics quslily; iU Ease at use: » Value for money; C Poor: * Average; ** Good; 

*** \.'erj- Good; **** Exccllcm; N.A Noi applicable; E Easy; A Average: D Difncult: f Longer review follows Chan 

•Titles listed for the IBM PC/PCjr will al50 nit\ on marty IBM PC compatibles; owing to the proliferation of compatibles, check with the publisher of The program or your i3ealer for compatibility. 



48 FAMILY COMPITTING 



NRJ Trains You At Home— As You Build Your Own IBM-Compatible Computer 

GET THE KNOIUHIOW 

TO SERVICE EVERY 

COMPUTER ON THIS PAGE. 



Learn tKe Basics the NRI 
Way-and Earn Good 
Money Troubleshooting 
Any Brand of Computer 

The bigyeal yruwth in jobs 
between now and 1995, 
according to Department of 
Labor estimates, will occur in 
the computer service and repair 
business, where demand for 
trained technicians will actually 
chuhte. 

You can cash in on 
this opportunity— either 
as a full-time corporate 
technician or an inde- 
pendent service-person 
— once you've learned all 
the basics of computers 
(he NRI way. NRI's 
practical combination of 
"reason-why" theory and 
"hands-on" building skills 
starts you with the funda- 
mentals of electronics, then 
guides you through advanced 
electronic circuitry and on into 
computer electronics. You also 
learn lo program in BASiC and machine 
language, the essential languages for 
troubleshooting and repair. 

Total Computer Systems 
llraining, Only From NRI 

No computer stands alone . . . it's part of 
a total system. To really service computers, 
you have lo understand computer systems. 
And only NRI includes a powerful com- 
puter system ns part of your training, 
centered around the new hilly IBM 
compatible Sanyo 880 Series computer. 

You start with the step-by-step 
asseinbiy of the new, highly rated fully 
IBM compatible Sanyo 880 Series com- 
puter. You install and troubieshoot the 
■'intelligent" keyboard. Then you assem- 
ble the power supply, install the disk 
drive, and add extra memory to give you 
a powerful 256K RAM system. The new 
880 computer has two operating speeds: 
standard IBM speed of 4.77 MHz and a 
reinarkabie turbo speed of 8 MHz, mak- 
ing it almost twice as fast as the IBM PC. 
Next, you'll interface the high-resolution 
monitor and begin lo use the valuable 
software also included with your com- 
plete computer system. 



IBM 4s a ReglstBfSd Tiidemark of ISM 
Corpor«1ion. 

EpBon is a Re^isleted Jittitmai^ o1 Epson 
Arnefica. Inc. 



Trademan^s o1 Apple Computer, mc 





mmmm 




no need to quit your present job until 
you're ready to make your move. Your 
training is backed up by your personal 
NRI instructor and the NRI technical staff, 
ready lo answer your questions 
and help you when you 
need it. You get it all with 
NRI at-home training. 

100>Page Free 
Catalog Tells More 

Send the [X)stage-paid 
, reply card today for 

/NRls big, l(«H:iage, 
color catalog on NRI's 
elech-onics h-aining, 
which gives you all 
the facts about 
NRI courses 
in Micro- 
computers, 
Robotics, 
Data Com- 
munications, 
TV/Audio/ 
Video Servicing, 
and otlier growing 
high-tech ciireer fields. 
If tlie reply card is missing, 
write to the address below. 



It all adds up to confidence- 
building, real-world experience 
that includes training in program- ^ 
ming, circuit design, and peripheral 
maintenance. You'll be learning about, 
working with, servicing, and trouble- 
shooting an entire computer system- 
monitor, keyboard, computer, disk drive, 
power supply— lo ensure that you have 
all the essential skills you need to succeed 
as a professional computer service 
technician. 

No Experience Needed, 
NRI Builds It In 

This is the kind of practical, hands-on 
experience that makes you uniquely 
prepared, with the skills and confidence 
you need for success. You learn at your 
own convenience in your own home. 
No classroom pressures, no night school. 




Your NBI total systems training includes: 
• NRI Oiscouery Lab ' to design and modity circuits • 
Your lour-function digital multimeter wilti walk-you- 
ttirough instructions on audio tape • Digital lo^ic 
probe (or visual examination ollieytKiard circuits • 
Ttie newest Sanyo 880 Series Computer with "intelli- 
gent" keyboard and 360K double-density, doublB.sided 
disk drive ■ High resolution monochrome monitor * 8K 
ROM. Z5BK RAIM ■ Bundled soltware including GW 
BASIC, MS-DOS, WordStar, CalcStar • Reference 
manuals, schematics, and l?ite>sized lessons. 



. NW 



SCHOOLS 

Mcriraw-flill Cunliriuijif^ l-kluL-.iliori Center 

,'t9l)H Wi.samsJH Avenue. 
Waslilnglon, DC200I() 



We'll Give 'Vou Tomorrow. 



m 



ENTERTAINMENT 


Title 

Publisher 

Price 


Brief 
description 


Hardwcire/ 
Equipment 
required 


Backup 
policy 


O 


R 
D 


atings 
PS|GQ 


EU 


V 


DEFENDER OF THE 

CROWN 

Cinemaware ,' Mlndscape 

3444 Dundee Road 

Northbrook. IL 60062 

(312) 480-7667 

S50 ©1986 


You play the role of a Sa.xon no- 
bleman, circa 1200, in this me- 
dieval adventure that combines 
dazzling graphics with arcade 
action. Use strategy to become 
king of England. + — delson 


512K Amiga. Color 

monitor, mouse, 
2nd drive 
recommended. 


90-day 

warranty. SI5 
thereafter ($21 
for both disks). 


* 
* 


* 


■it 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


A 


* 

* 


DESERT FOX 

Avantage/Accolade 
20813 Stevens Creek Blvd. 
Cupertino, CA 95014 
(4081 446-5757 
$15 ©1985 


As a World War 11 tank com- 
mander in the North African de- 
sert, you must protect your sup- 
ply depot against the Nazi forces. 
Nonstop action keeps your trig- 
ger linger busy. — dei.son 


C 64/128. Joystick. 


90-day 
warranty. $6 
thereafter. $10 
for backup. 


* 
* 


* 
* 

* 


* 


* 
* 


A 


* 
* 
* 


FERRARI GRAND PRIX 

Bullseye Software 
P.O. Drawer 7900 
Incline Village. NV 89450 
(702)831-2523 
S60S1986 


Get behind (he wheel of a high- 
powered Ferrari as you learn the 
basics of authentic racing, such 
as breaking, shifting gears, and 
negotiating some wicked curves. 
Build race tracks, too. — addams 


5 12K Macintosh. 


90-day 

warranty. SIO 
thereafter. 


* 


* 

* 
* 


* 


* 
* 

* 


D 


-* 
* 


GRANDSLAM BRIDGE 
Electronic Arts 
1820 Gateway Drive 
San Mateo. CA 94404 
{415)571-7171 
S60O1986 


If you want to learn how to play 
bridge, this program will help by 
telling you whether or not you're 
making the correct move. If you 
just want to play, then you can 
choose from over a billion 
hands! — delson 


256K IBM PC Color 
monitor, joystick 
optional. 


90-day 
warranty. S7 
for backup. 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 
* 


A 


* 

* 
* 


GUNSLINGER 
Datasoft/IntelliCreations 
19808 Nordhoff Place 
Chatsworth. CA 91311 
(818) 886-5922 
S30 ©1986 


Beginners can enjoy this text/ 
graphic adventure where they 
play the part of a western hero 
out to save a pal from the hang- 
man's noose. Solve puzzles and 
survive adventures. — delson 


Reviewed on Apple. 
Also for Atari, C 64/ 
128. Joystick optional. 


90-day 

warranty, S7.50 
thereafter. 


* 
* 


* 


* 


* 
* 


A 


* 


HIGH STAKES 
Mindscape, Inc. 
(see abo^■e for address 
and phone) 
S40 ©1986 


You're an English millionaire 
who must recover his stolen race 
horse in this text-only adventure 
based on the Dick Francis mys- 
tery. Some interaction, but 
primarily a puzzler. — ^addams 


Reviewed on 64 K Apple. 
Also for IBM PC,' 256K 
IBM PCjr. Macintosh. 


90-day 
warranty. 

SI 2. 50 for 

backup. 


* 
* 


* 
* 


* 


N/A 


A 


* 


MOONIWIST 

Infocorn 

125 Cambridge Park Drive 

Cambridge, MA 02138 

(617)492-6000 

$35-$40 ©1986 


This text-only adventure, set in a 
haunted castle, offers you three 
goals; find a treasure, identify 
the ghost, and dig up evidence 
of a crime. With four variations 
on the theme, it's quite replay- 
able. + —ADiMMS 


Reviewed on Apple. 
Also for Amiga, Atari, 
Atari ST, C 64/128, IBM 
PC/PCjr,* Macintosh. 


90-day 
warranty. S5 
thereafter. Not 
copy-protected. 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 
* 

* 


N/A 


E 


* 
* 
* 


THE OFFICIAL 

AMERICA'S CUP SAILING 

SIMULATION 

Electronic Arts 

(see above for address 

and phone) 

S33 ©1986 


Put yourself at the helm of a 12- 
metcr yacht in this simulation of 
the America's Cup races. Choose 
type of sail and maneuver 
around the course altering your 
tactics to take full advantage of 
the wind. — IJELSON 


C 64/128. Joystick(s). 


90-day 

warranty, S7.50 
thereafter. 


* 
* 


* 
* 
* 

* 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 


A 


* 
* 
A 


SUB MISSION 
Mindscape, Inc. 
{see above for address 
and phone) 
S40C1986 


Rescue a pair of hostages by de- 
feating the Warlord in an under- 
water war game that plays tike a 
submarine simulator. But run 
out of air, and a hostage is 
erased from your disk!+ — addams 


Reviewed on 64K Apple. 
Also for 256K IBM PC/ 
PCjr.* Joystick optional. 


90-day 
warranty. 
SI 2.50 for 
backup. 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 

■k 


* 
* 


A 


* 
* 


WORLD KARATE 

CHAMPIONSHIP 

Epvx, Inc. 

600 Galveston Drive 

Redwood Citv. CA 94063 

(415)366-0606 

$30-S35 451986 


Karate. I learned from this game, 
is like ballet: You've got to cho- 
reograph your moves, then exe- 
cute them with precision timing. 
With 14 authentic karate moves 
and smooth animation, — ^addams 


Reviewed on 64K Apple. 
Also for Atari, Atari ST, 
C 64/128. IBM PC/ 
PCjr.* Joystick. 


90-day 

warranty. S5 
thereafter. 


* 


* 


* 
* 


* 
* 


D 


■k 
* 


BATJNOS KET O Overall pcrforniancc; D Documenlalioii; P> Play System; ttd Graphics quality: fell East of use: ¥ Value for money: O Poor; * Avcragt; ** Gootl; 

*** Very Goad; **** Excellent: N'A Noi applicable: E Easy: A AveraiJe: D Difficult: ♦ Longer review follows chart 

•Tiiles listed for the IBM PC/PCjrii.'ill also niri on many IBM PC compailbles: owing to iheprollferailonof compatibles, check with the publisher of the program oryour dealer for compatibility. 



50 FAMILY COMPtrriNG 




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r 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 16 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



On the following pages, you'll find 
in-depth reviews of some of the pro- 
grams lis!ed in the Soflware Guide. 
Refer back to the Guide on page 
46 for information such as backup 
policies and addresses of software 
publishers. 

EDUCATION/ 
FUN LEARNING 

First Shapes 

IIARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: 5 1 2K 

Ami|*a, Apple lies, Atari ST, C 64/ 
128, 512K Macintosh. 
t^UBLlSHER: First Byte, Inc. 

PRICE: S50 

PUBLISHER'S SUGGESTED AGES: 3-8 

A game for toddlers that toddlers 
really can play. First Shapes teaches 
shape-recognition skills in an envi- 
ronment that grows along with your 
child. Instructions are spoken aloud 
by Ted E. Bear, the on-screen host, 
so even prc-readers can get involved 
with the game. 





















w 


SiX'ARE 




■E^9 


Ij^HHBQIQ 









Five different learning activities 
are selected from a mouse-operated 
picture menu. The Shapes section 
teaches children to recognize five ba- 
sic geometric figures, such as trian- 
gles, circles, and ovals. Children can 
make the shapes larger or smaller, 
and they can ask Ted E. Bear to say 
the name of any shape. Next, chil- 
dren gel to build toys from the 
shapes. The computer gamely goes 
along with whatever the child sug- 
gests, even if thafs a train with 
square wheels and an oval coal car. 

Make-A-Match is a classic memory 
game — like televisions "Concentra- 
tion" — in which children peek at two 
shapes each turn and then must re- 
member where they are to make 
matches. Players select difficulty lev- 
els ranging from games of five 
matches to games with sixteen; they 
can play alone, with a friend, or 
against the computer. When playing 
against the computer, children can 



decide whether Ted E. Bear will be 
silly, smart, or very smart. 

At first. 5-year-old Todd some- 
times had to ask a helper what the 
computer had said, but after a few 
sessions could understand it with 
no trouble. And Todd wasn't the 
only one who enjoyed making silly 
toys and beating Ted E. Bear at 
Make-A-Match: An older brother and 
sister waited In line for their turns, 
too. We highly recommend this pro- 
gram for any child old enough to 
click a mouse button and predict 
that Ted E. Bear will be a favorite 
companion for years to come. 

—TAN A. SUMMERS 

Talking Text Writer 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: 128K Apple 

Ile/IIc/IlGS. 

PUBLISHER: Scholastic Software 

PRICE: S250 

PUBLISHER'S SUGGESTED AGES: 5-12 

On occasion, I've spoken to my com- 
puter, but it never talked back to me 
before. Now, with Talking Text Writ- 
er and its accompanying speech syn- 
thesizer, my Apple speaks loudly and 
clearly — although it sounds like an 
alien from another planet is practic- 
ing English inside it. 

I watched children who are learn- 
ing to read and write practice their 
skills. Six-year-old Amy, for example, 
typed the alphabet in large, easy-to- 
read letters on a 20-column screen. 
The letters flashed and the computer 
pronounced each one. She pro- 
gressed to typing nonsense syllables 
such as "zzyz" and learned how 
sound relates to printed letters. 

Third-grader Lori typed whole 
words on a 40-column screen. Some 
of the words sounded strange, so 
she used the 'fix speech" feature to 
tell the computer how to pronounce 
her words. Unfortunately, the pro- 
nunciation didn't improve consider- 
ably after she entered the phonetic 
spelling. 

The disadvantage of using a 
speech synthesizer to produce 
speech is that the words sound like 
tj'pical computer talk. The advan- 
tage, however, is that a speech syn- 
thesizer can access an unlimited vo- 
cabulary, as contrasted to the 
alternative — a digitized voice that 
can speak specific words only. Lori 
didn't mind the occasional artificial 
pronunciations because she loved 
typing and then hearing her own 
words. 

Nine-year-old Jason used the ad- 
vanced. 80-column option to type a 



brief adventure story. He listened to 
it several times, called in everyone 
else to hear it. and then printed out 
a copy for posterity. 

Talking Text Writer encourages 
young children to write, to write 
more, and to write more often. It can 
also help youngsters with speech 
and hearing loss and other commu- 
nication disabilities to reinforce lan- 
guage skills. With Talking Text Writ- 
er, children use computer 
technology as a tool instead of as a 
toy. yet the fun of the auditory, visu- 
al, and tactile feedback motivates 
them to acquire and perfect lan- 
guage skills. 

Talking Text Writer is an expen- 
sive program. While not a necessity 
for children without reading prob- 
lems, it can help those youngsters 
gain greater language skills more 
quickly. For teachers, clinicians, and 
parents of children with language 
impairment, it is a worthwhile in- 
vestment that will Increase the likeli- 
hood of success with literacy skills. 

— GWEN SOLOMON 



HOME BUSINESS & 
PBOPUCTIVITY 

AutoWorlts 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: 128K Apple 
Ile/IlC/llGS. 

PUBLISHER: The Software Touch 

PRICE: S50 

MacroWerlts 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: 1 28K Apple 

Ile/IIc/IlGS. 

PUBLISHER: Beagle Brothers, Inc. 

PRICE: S35 

People who work with AppleWorks 
have a lot of spare time on their 
hands — albeit in 20-second seg- 
ments — while the disk drives chug 
away. Though some might view this 
delay as a golden opportunity to col- 
lect their thoughts, others are an- 
noyed by it. AppleWorks also has 
some omissions in its design, which 
become ever more galling with long- 
term use. Fortunately, AppleWorks 
was developed with expansion in 
mind. 

Two add-on packages that effec- 
tively take up where AppleWorks 
leaves off are MacroWorks and 
AutoWorks. Both rely on macros 
(which convert lengthy series of key- 
strokes into new, two-keystroke 
AppleWorks commands) to increase 
productivity. Both add mouse capa- 
bility to AppleWorks, too, and 



52 FAMILY COMPUTINfi 



AutoWorks also has a mail-merge op- 
tion — an indispensable adjunct to 
any serious business use of 
AppleWorks. 

When using MacmWorks. I partic- 
ularly enjoyed the various new com- 
mands that the macro function of- 
fers, such as being able to move the 
cursor instantly to the beginning or 
end of a line. In addition, it's great 
to be able to add files to the desktop 
without having to wade through a 
long series of menus, to find a word 
without having to erase the previous 
word sought, and to print without 
running through the prefatory 
prompts. 

In total, 25 predefined macros are 
included on disk. You can also de- 
fine 10 "temporary'" macros each 
time you boot up. These can be help- 
ful when you repeat words or 
phrases. For example, instead of re- 
peatedly typing the 10 strokes neces- 
sary to write AppleWorks in this re- 
view. I merely pressed Closed- 
Apple-3, and the program's name ap- 
peared in my text. Users of the 
MacroWorks/AppleWorks combo can 
create and save their own macros 
and can make customized help 
screens that help them remember 
any new macros. 

In AutoWorks. the mail-merge ca- 
pability alone may make this pack- 
age worth the price of admission 
(note, though, that AppleWorks 2.0. 
the latest version, has mail-merge 
built in). Mail-merge is explained 
simply and efficiently with 
AutoWorks: it is truly a marvel to 
watch AppleWorks automatically 
swapping information from its data 
base to its word processor as a se- 
ries of form letters are printed out. 

It was not so easy (at least not for 
me) to learn to use AutoWorks' built- 
in macros or its customized macro 
capability. I think the problem lies 
in the terminology selected for the 
package's pop-up menu, as well as 
documentation that assumes more 
sophistication and comfort with 
writing macros than I felt. 

Once mastered, the process of re- 
cording your own macros with 
AutoWorks is much easier than with 
MacroWorks. Unlike MacroWorks. 
the AutoWorks/AppleWorks duo lets 
you easily add new macros into a file 
of existing macros. With both pack- 
ages, the addition of mouse control 
io AppleWorks is a good idea, al- 
though I found it difficult to control 
the exact position of the mouse on 
an 80-column screen. 



Be forewarned, however. Even 
though each program faithfully mi- 
mics the AppleWorks command 
structure, incorporating either into 
your use of AppleWorks might, at 
first, offer a steep learning curve. 
Long-time users of macros advocate 
keeping a printout of new macro 
commands at your side until they 
are memorized. 

Both MacroWorks and AutoWorks 
contain even more features than 
there's room to mention here, while 
giving you a significantly improved 
version of AppleWorks. While 
MacroWorks is easier to learn, 
AutoWorks is finally more compre- 
hensive and flexible. 

—DEBORAH KOVACS 



PFS: Professional Write 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: 320K IBM 
PC. 

PUBLISHER: Software Publishing Corp. 

PitlCE:S199 

As top-of-the-line word-processing 
software becomes increasingly com- 
plex, there has been growing inter- 
est in simpler but still sophisticated 
writing tools. The thrust of these 
programs is to offer all the basics, 
plus selected convenience features, 
in a package that can be learned as 
quickly as possible. The PFS series 
has long been an ease-of-use leader, 
and now the publishers have dra- 
matically improved their original 
PFS: Write to produce a version with 
a host of elegantly presented fea- 
tures and only a few flaws. 

PFS; Professional Write provides 
an excellent on-screen working envi- 
ronment. Line and page position 
and position on the current line arc 
always visible. Drop-down menus, 
accessed by function keys, make se- 
lection of filing, printing, format- 
ting, and editing commands abso- 
lutely simple. Equally important, all 
the most common commands can be 
called either from the menu or with 
a logical control-key combination. 
Holding down CONTROL while 
pressing "W" deletes a single word, 
for example, while CONTROL-L de- 
letes a line, CONTROL-U underlines, 
and so forth. 

A dictionary for checking spelling 
and a thesaurus for suggesting syn- 
onvTns are included, and both work 
well. The macro feature, which re- 
cords a sequence of keystrokes and 
plays them back when you hold 
down ALT and a single letter or 
number key, allows j'ou to customize 






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SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



the program to automatically accom- 
plish tasks you perform frequently. 
such as loading a form letter Into 
memory. 

With all that's right about Profes- 
sional Write. 1 still found a few nag- 
ging problems. The program allows 
only single or double spacing. You 
are also restricted to a single right- 
margin setting for the entire docu- 
ment, which makes it impossible to 
properly indent long quotes. Under 
ordinary circumstances, page breaks 
are clearly indicated. However, a 
page break you insert manually will 
print properly but not show up on- 
screen. That makes it impossible to 
tell where pages will break from then 
on, which 1 consider a major flaw. 

Students writing academic papers 
or business typists who work with 
strictly formatted material should 
probably invest in a more powerful 
program and learn it piece by piece. 
But for someone who doesn't want 
to muck around with a complex 
word processor, but still wants ac- 
cess to an excellent spelling checker, 
a thesaurus, and macro capabilities 
(in a program you can learn in an 
hourl, PFS: Professional Write is a 
very good choice. 

—STEVE MORGENSTEliN 



ENTERTAINMENT 



Defender of the Crown 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: 5 12K 

Amiga. 

PUBLISHER: Cinemawarc, distributed 

by Mindscape, Inc. 

PRICE: S50 

REVIEWERS SUGGESTED AGES: 12 + 

\Vhen William the Conquerer van- 
quished the Saxon army at Hastings 
in 1066, he only began the process 
of subjugating England. More than 
150 years later, the ruling Normans 
were still putting down rebellions by 
such colorful characters as Ivanhoe 
and Robin Hood, who dreamed of a 
land once again led by a Saxon king. 
In Defender of the Crown, you play 
the role of a Saxon nobleman whose 
aim is to defeat the Normans and re- 
establish the Saxon line on the En- 
glish throne. 

Using a highly refined animation 
process, the designers of Defender 
of the Croujn have created the best 
set of graphics yet available in a 
computer game. You joust against 
Saxon and Norman knights at 
Ashby, seeing your opponents 



charge at you and their lances low- 
ered to strike your shield. You at- 
tempt to rescue Saxon damsels in 
distress, dueling with your sword 
against the varlcts who hold the 
lovelies captive. And when you be- 
siege the castles of your opponents, 
you see the walls knocked down by 
stones hurled from your catapults. 




As you unseat foes on the jousting 
field, you can win portions of their 
lands. As you rescue damsels in dis- 
tress, your leadership rating goes 
up, and as you learn to knock down 
the enemy walls, castles fall more 
easily to your armies. All of these ac- 
tions combine with your skill as a 
tactician to reconquer England. 

The game is designed so that It 
can be won by using either arcade- 
style victories, stratcgic-and-tactical 
maneuverings. or a combination of 
the two. But while it's lots of fun to 
play, and always enthralling to 
watch, the designers apparently 
chose to concentrate their energies 
on the graphics instead of the play 
system. Thus, once you've mastered 
each of the game's required skills, it 
becomes too easy to win. 

Defender of the Crown is recom- 
mended as an introductory-level 
strategy-and-lactics program. Inter- 
mediate and advanced players 
should be wary, however, because 
they might become bored with the 
game's play system after a few ses- 
sions. —JAMES DELSON 



Meenmist 

HAl^DWARE REQUIREMENTS: Amiga. Ap- 
ple, Atari. Atari ST. C 64/128, IBM 
PC/PCjr, Macintosh. 
PUBLISHER: Infocom 

PRICE: S35-S40 

REVIEWER'S SUGGESTED AGES: 1 1 + 

The chief drawback to adventure 
games is their lack of replay value. 
After you've solved all the puzzles, 
the game just takes up shelf space. 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 17 
54 f-AMlLV COMI'UTINO 



Moonmist. however, evades this fate 
by offering four variations on the 
mystery that takes place in a haunt- 
ed castle in contemporary England. 
In each, you must accomplish the 
same goals: identify the ghost, find a 
treasure, and uncover evidence of an 
attempted murder so you can arrest 
the killer — all within a 12-hour time 
limit. The castle's layout remains 
identical (the documentation pro- 
vides a floor plan), but the ghost's 
identity varies in each version, and 
so do the answers to the other mys- 
teries. Not only that, but even the 
puzzles differ, and a valuable object 
in one game may prove worthless in 
another. 

Naming your favorite color at the 
outset determines which version 
you'll play. After you type in your 
name and sex, and they're incorpo- 
rated into the story's dialogue, your 
friend Tamara shows you around 
the castle, introducing you as a fa- 
mous American private detective. 
You must interact with characters 
such as the butler. Dr. Wendish. 
and others, to gather some of the 
clues, while many others are discov- 
ered by manipulating objects. 

The plot surfaces at dinner, alter 
Tamara announces her engagement 
to Lord Jack. Suddenly, the voice of 
Jack's deceased uncle, Lord Lionel, 
speaks from a concealed tape record- 
er. He tells of a treasure hidden in 
the castle and provides the first clue 
to its location. These clues consist of 
brief poems and riddles that lead 
you to more clues and eventually to 
the treasure, while creaking doors, 
cobwebs, and a secret passageway 
lend suitable atmospherics. Though 
this is a mystery, all four versions 
are far easier than Deadline or Sus- 
pect, so it's a good choice for nov- 
ices. — SHAYADDAMS 



Sub Mission 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: 64K Apple. 

25 6K IBM PC/PC/r. 

PUBLISHER: Mindscape, Inc. 

PRICE: S40 

REVIEWER'S SUGGESTED AGES: 1 + 

Sub Mission plays for keeps— -if your 
submarine runs out of air with a 
human on board, the character is 
erased from the disk! Your goal is to 
rescue a pair of hostages, Sigourny 
and Peter, from the Warlord by beat- 
ing him at his underwater war 
game. Victory goes to the first sub- 
marine that finds and shoots a deep- 



sea mine. Although you direct the 
sub by remote-control, someone 
must be on board to execute your or- 
ders. A robot can do the job, which 
is good for practice, but that won't 
save the hostages, since the rescue 
requires finding an escape route 
that only he or she can reveal — bit 
by bit — while inside the sub. 

Controlling the sub is easy. You 
type commands like "FS" to move 
forward at a speed of five knots and 
"D21" to dive to a depth of 21 fath- 
oms. A joystick may be used for 
steering, but 1 found the keyboard 
controls sufficient. The bay's outline 
is shown in a chart in center screen, 
and a sonar screen alerts you to the 
location and depth of underwater 
mines. You have to shoot these 
mines in order to find the deep-sea 
mine. 




After hitting an undenvater mine 
with the harpoon gun, you "ignite" 
with a jolt of electricity to scan the 
area within a circle that appears in 
the main display. In a line of text, 
your crew member notifies you 
whether the deep-sea mine is inside 
the circle. Then you can set off one 
of the five mines carried on the sub 
to ignite a smaller area within the 
circle, in hopes of pinpointing the 
deep-sea mine. The Warlord's sub 
might attack, rocks and mines pre- 
sent navigational hazards, and 
you've got to surface regularly to re- 
charge the batteries and get air. 

Sound effects are scarce and 
there's no fast-paced animation, but 
the suspense is unparalleled as you 
get closer to discovering the escape 
route — while the air supply dwin- 
dles, A character who dies and is 
erased can be restored once, but af- 
ter that you must send the disk (and 
S7!) to Mindscape, Inc. to restore 
them. Sub Mission is entertaining 
because it puts an original twist on 
the idea of a submarine simulator 
and e.xciting because a "life" is really 
on the line. — shayaddams 



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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 11 




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MAY 1B87 55 



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Turn Your Computer Into a Starship. 



Beam Aboard, Captain. 

Your starship is 
fueled and ready. Your 
crew is fully trained. You 
launch from Starport, 
heading toward the gal- 
axy's core on a hunch. 
You've been chosen to 
seek new worlds to col- 
onize. New resources 
for a homeworld gone 
stale. 

Your navigator zeroes 
in on a red dwarf star. 
Long-range scans show 
three planets: a gas 
giant, a frozen ice 
world, and a blue- 
oceaned paradise that 
looks just like heaven. 
A good place to land. 

Suddenly a klaxon sounds. 
"Captain, we're being scanned," 
says your Science Officer. A giant 
hologram of a squid-like crea- 





Explore Strange New Worlds 
Land on different planets to collect valu- 
able minerals, lifcform specimens, and 
artifacts from ancient civilizations. But 
keep your laser on stun — not all the locals 
will be glad to see you. 



ture appears on your view screen 
and hisses, "Prepare to die, air- 
breathers." 

Your space odyssey has just 
begun. 




Talk to Alieits 
Each alien race, like this Veloxi, has a unique 
culture, personality, and language. They 
can give you clues— if you can get them to 
trust you. 



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cer, and Captain. 

•Includes full starmap 
and security decoder. 

• The state-of-the-art in enter- 
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man-years in development. 




"Standard Orbit, Captain." 
From hull-crushing gas giants to frozen 
dwarves, each star system is unique. Study 
your sensors carefully — there's a stiff fine 
for recommending colonization of boiling 
lava planets. 




ELECTRONIC ARTS" 
For the IBMr* Tandy* and all 100% compatibles. 256K RAM required. Not copy-protected. 

How to Order VisH your reinileq or cill SOD-24f;-4525 for direct VESA or Msstercud ordeo Un CA call 800-562-1115). There is a M-day, money-back guarantee on direct orders. The price 
for direct orders is S49.95 To order by mail, send check or money order to Electronic Arts Direct Sales, PO Box 7530, San Mateo. CA 94403. Add S3 tor shipping and handling 
( S4 Canadian). Allow 4 weeks for delivery. For a complete product catalog, send 50e and a stamped, sell- addressed il 10 envelope to Electronic Arti Catalog Offer, 1820 Gateway Drive, San 
Mateo. CA 94404. IBM is Jt regiiicred trademark df Internal ion si Business Machi nes. Inc. Starflight and Electronic Arts are registered trademarks cif ElecirtJnic Arts. 



Slarflight Cluebook aisD available S12.95 direct 



m 



This Month! I 

GAME STRATEGY, page 58 
MICROTOMES, pa^c 59 



Edited by Bemadette Grey 



FOR THE COMPUTER GENERATION 



SOnWARE SCOOP 

Have a few laughs with Accolade 
Comics, a computerized interactive 
comic book that tells the story of a 
spy named Steve Kccnc. whose mis- 
sion is to foil evil plots for the Chief 
of Spystuff, Inc. You. the player, di- 
rect the story line by selecting from 
a scries of possible answers to ques- 
tions asked of Kcenc. Accolade Com- 
ics is available for the Commodore 
64/128 ($39.95) and the Apple II se- 
ries (S44.95) from Accolade ([408] 
446-5757). . . .While the computer 
age is still young, software publish- 
ers are already bringing back some 
"classic" computer games. Activislon 
(1415) 960-0410) recently announced 
the first in its series of Solid Gold 
Software titles offering entertainment 
classics in a single package for 
S 14.95. The first release features 
two computer game classics — Pitfall! 
and Demon Attack— which together 
have sold over 7 million copies since 




CinciiMWarc's D€f€iid€r tf th« Crotn 

1982. The pack is available for the 
Commodore 64/128 and Atari XE/XL 
series. , . .You may have heard that 
MIndscape ([312] 480-7667) has four 
titles in its new CincmaWare Interac- 
tive text/graphic adventure stories 
with graphics that are so great that 
you might think you're at the mov- 
ies. In f>efender of the Crown, you're 
a brave knight whose days are filled 
with daring jousts, dangerous sword 
Fights, and enemy castles under 
siege. Use your skills to save En- 



gland and win the crown with your 
Amiga. Apple IIgs, Atari 52087: 
Commodore 64/128, or Macintosh 
(S34.95-S49.95). The King of Chicago 
puts you against forces of the leg- 
endary Capone mob in battle of con- 
trol of Chicago. It's available for the 
Macintosh and versions are planned 
for the Amiga, Apple IlGS. and Atari 
520ST (S34.95-S49.95). You'U also 
want to check out SDI (Strategic De- 
fense Initiative), which throws you 
into space combat in a state-of-the- 
art flight simulator and Sinbad and 
the Throne of the Falcon, an epic sea- 
faring quest. Versions for Amiga, 
Atari ST, and other computers are 
planned. . . .The less daring can 
skip the sword fights, space combat. 
and dangerous seas, and stay safe 
indoors with Mindscape's Indoor 
Sports (S29.95). Commodore 64/128 
owners can try a little air hockey, 
bowl a few frames, shoot some darts, 
or challenge a friend or the comput- 
er to a game of table tennis. 



OUR R^VORITE COKTEST WINNERS 



Last October, we held a contest 
called "My Favorite," in which we 
asked our readers to tell us what 
their favorite games are and why. We 
collected your responses in a big 
brown box, chose three of our favor- 
ite entries, and awarded these three 
readers SlO apiece. Our contest win- 



ner. Jennifer Amy, 17, of Frederick, 
Maryland, says that her favorite 
game is Hitchhiker's Guide to the 
Gaiaxy "for lis frequently subtle or 
slapstick humor and sense of adven- 
ture. " Shad Vork. 13, of Lancaster. 
Texas, likes King's Quest "because 
vou have to really think about some 



of Che situations so that it's not too 
easy, and it helps me to think more 
creatively," And Conrad Davis. 15, of 
Austin, Texas, enjoys Archon II "be- 
cause it combines strategy, skill, 
graphics, e.xciting game elements, 
sound, the thrill of victorj'. and the 
agony of defeat — all in one game." 



A LCTTER FROM A READER 

Fellow hacker and poet extraordi- 
naire, Chrlsta Starr, welcomed the 
new SPECIAL Ks with this letter: 

Dear New special Ks. 
Here Is a poem about a fellow 
computer nut's plight. 1 call it 
"Tears on the Terminal." 



I'm crying at my terminal. 
I am so sad and blue. 
I had almostjinished Zork. 
When I was eaten by a Grue! 

I'm crying at my terminal. 
Because I know it's true 
That after I've done Zork i. 

I'm doomed to iry Zork II! 



I'm crying at my lerminaL 

Never will I be free. 

For after I've conquered 1 and II. 

Oh no!! Here comes Zork Hi!!! 

— CHRiSTA STARR. 13. Lunenburg, 
Massachusetts 

P.S. Good luck at your new jobs!!! 



MAY 1987 57 



TIPS, 

DEJAVU 

Mlndscape. Text/Graphic adventure. 
Your mission: You wake up in a 
men's room with a throbbing bump 
on the back of your head and you 
don't know who you are or how you 
got there. Overcome your bout of 
amnesia, figure out what happened, 
and most important, clear yourself 
of a murder charge. (The hints and 
game are for the Amiga and Macin- 
tosh.] 



K S, 



HINTS 




All sorts of creeps ream the streets. 

■p^ If you stop to look at the pic- 
tures in the hallway, you'll discover 
your best weapon. 

<^M» Try opening everything, in- 
cluding guns, desks, windows. 



coals, and even people (dead or 
alive). 

^>^ As Ace Harding, you're guilty 
until proven innocent. Stay away 
from the police unless you're sure 
you can clear yourself, 

^^^ You'll want to hop in the 
Mercedes, but if you start the en- 
gine, it will only take you up. 

^mm Stay off the streets as much 
as possible. The police, the mugger, 
and others are bound to find you if 
you're out in the open. 

^i^ Whenever you hear the siren, 
hide out until you think the coast is 
clear. 

<^M*» Don't waste $20 on an extra 
gun, but be sure to buy some bullets 
for a gun you already have. 

•P^* Take a cab ride to every ad- 
dress you find. 

^^* There's only one person you 
have to kill. You may gel a warning 
about him before you see him. 

^^* A pencil will make disappear- 
ing words reappear. 

^^^ Make sure your inventory 
has a large supply of truth serum. 
You'll want to make people talk. 



BREAKERS 

Synapse/Broderbund. Text adven- 
ture. Your mission: Escape from the 
space colony orbiting your home 
planet of Borg. break up the band of 
evil space pirates that capture and 
enslave your people, and collect the 
four elements that will save your 
world from destruction. It won't be 
easy, especially for a little, bald, 
golden Lau like yourself, but it's ei- 
ther succeed or end up as dinner for 
some Cirdonian or a basketball for a 
Gak. {The hints and game are for the 
Apple U series and Commodore 641 
128.) 

•P^ Betty can help you. If you are 
polite, inquisitive, and persistent. 

<^kM» Take time to answer Beek's 
riddles. They could save bloodshed 
later. 

•P^* When Oaks pay a visit to 
Rigg's apartment, hang out with the 
hangers. 



^^* Spending time with Bobo 
could be worth your while. 

^tmm A tired driver will believe just 

about anjthing you say. 

"^^ Take a crash course in driv- 
ing at Gak headquarters. 

^^^ A desperate prisoner may 
throw in the towel — or throw some- 
thing else. 

^^^ Nate Grey appreciates people 
with a positive attitude. 

■^MB Your Buddy just isn't the 
same without a cup of coffee, 

^Mn» As far as Borg is concerned, 
you mean business, and you should 
let Casey Jones know that, Insist 
that he takes you home. 

'%>^ Bobo can turn up in the most 
surprising places. If you help her. 
she might lend you a hand. 

<^M» Kobbies can be helpful, but 
they are a little hard of hearing. 



'9^ Be ready to hit people 
tor buttons, and doorknobs. 


elcva- 




B* »*!*■ I.,..T l.l..lV..r 


1 "^' ^^1 


^^^^^^^^^H tMaitutH- 1 1»^« ii*><- ( ^I>fat H 


^^^^^^^^^H VBrt«li- 1 Mi 1 till 1 Innurni' H 








^ 



There's no such thing as a free ride. 

*^^» You can count on your cab 
driver as long as you pay your fares. 

<^^ No. you're not in Las Vegas. 
but you'll have to gamble for cab 
rides. 

^^* You can get your memory 

back if you get to Dr. Brody's on 

time. 

•p^ The sewer is a good place to 

dump items that a jury could hold 

against you. 

^^^ No jury will believe you un- 
less you have solid evidence. Don't 
go to the police without a dlaiy or 
an itinerary. 



•pi^ A bo.x is no place for a Lau to 
stay longer than necessary. 

«^^» Plant the idea in the Mucker's 
head that it should not eat you, 

<^^ The keg can be used to get up 
in the world: so can the belt of a 
hapless adventurer. 

<^av White lies can have just the 

right effect on Mulcahy. but don't lie 
about the medallion. 

^mm The creature in the cranny 
will take you on a strange journey if 
you relax and make yourself a drink. 

^tmm Be daring: Lau can survive in 
very inhospitable environments. 

^■w The sleeping breaker has your 
key to success. 

<%tmm In the amphitheater, you may 
encounter an old friend. 

<^mm Use gathered elements to 
complete the heavens. 

— THE SPECIAL Ks 



58 KAMILY COMPUrrNG 




MUSIC PROGRAMS 

BY JOEY 

ON TOP OF 
SPAGHETTI 

"Do you feel like having 
spaghetti tonight?" my 
wife called up to me from 
the bottom of the stairs. 
Little did she know that I 
had spent the entire day 
writing a program called 
On Top of Spaghetti for K- 
POWER. "Sorry, hon, I'm not 
hungry just yet," I replied 

hastily, although 1 was famished. She'll understand — 
and so will you — why I wasn't particularly hungry for 
spaghetti, when you type in this month's music pro- 
gram. SAVE it, and then run it. Excuse me while 1 sneeze 




AH CHOOO! 



Jl 



ADAM/ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI 



PRINT 



t2 + 1 



10 LOHEH: 29M0:OIM c(25),d(22),n1 C22),n2(H2),w$(2S) 
20 FOR X = 2800B TO 28005: READ m:POKE x,m;NEXT x 
30 POKE 28906, 159:CALL 28000 
40 FOR X = 1 TO 22:READ n;n2(x) = INT(ti/16) 
50 n1(x) = n-n2Cx>*16:REAt) d<x):NEXT x 
60 FOR X = 1 TO 25:READ c Cx),wSCx) :NEXT x 
70 TEXT:PR1NT TAB C5);"- ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI ■ 
80 t1 = 1:t2 = 1:F0R y = 1 TO 6:PRINT 
90 FOR X = 1 TO 22 

100 IF cCt2) = t1 THEN PRINT TAB(2);HS(t2) : t2 
110 POKE 28006, U4:CALL 28000 
120 POKE 280«6,128+n1(x):CALL 28000 
130 POKE 28006,n2(x):CALL 28009 
U0 FOR de = 1 TO d(x)*20«:NEXT de:t1 = t1+1 
150 POKE 28006, 1S9:CALL 28000:NEXT x,y 
160 PRINT:PRINT "Press <Q> to quit" 
170 PRINT "or any other key to ptay again."; 
180 GET k$:IF k$ <> "Q" AND k$ <> "q" THEN 70 
190 END 

999 REK —MACHINE LANGUAGE DATA- 
ISM DATA 58,102,109,211,255,201 

1999 REM —TIMING AND TEXT DATA— 

2000 DATA 859,1,859,1,682,1,574,1,430,4,511,6 
2010 DATA 511,1,644,1,574,1,511,1,574,9 
2020 DATA 574,1,859,1,682,1,574,1,574,4,766,6 



2999 REM —TEXT AND TIMING DATA— 

3000 DATA 1,0N TOP OF SPAGHETTI 
3010 DATA 7, ALL COVERED WITH CHEESE 
3020 DATA 12,1 LOST MY POOR MEATBALL 
3030 DATA 18,UHEN SOMEBODY SNEEZED. 
3040 DATA 23, IT FELL OFF THE TABLE 
3050 DATA 29, AND ONTO THE FLOOR 

3060 DATA 34, AND THEN MY POOR MEATBALL 

3070 DATA 40,ROLLED OUT OF THE DOOR. 

3080 DATA 45, IT ROLLED IN THE GARDEN 

3090 DATA 51, AND UNDER A BUSH 

3100 DATA 56, AND THEN MY POOR MEATBALL 

3110 DATA 62, WAS NOTHING BUT MUSH. 

3120 DATA 67, THE MUSH WAS AS TASTY 

3130 DATA 73,AS TASTY CAN BE 

3140 DATA 78, AND EARLY NEXT SUMMER 

3150 DATA 84, GREW INTO A TREE. 

3160 DATA 89, THE TREE WAS ALL COVERED 

3170 DATA 95, WITH BEAUTIFUL MOSS 

3180 DATA 100, IT GREW LOVELY MEATBALLS 

3190 DATA 106,AND TOMATO SAUCE, 

3200 DATA 111, IF YOU EAT SPAGHETTI 

3210 DATA 117,ALL COVERED WITH CHEESE 

3220 DATA 122, HOLD ONTO YOUR MEATBALLS 

5230 DATA 128,AND DON'T EVER SNEEZE1,0,0 



J 



T2+1 



APPLE II SERIES/ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI 

10 DIM C<25),D(22),N(22),L$C25) 

20 FOR X = 768 TO 796:READ MLiPOKE X,HL:NEXT X 

30 FOR X = 1 TO 22:READ NCX),DCX J :NEXT X 

40 FOR X = 1 TO 25:READ C(X>,L$<X) :NEXT X 

50 HOME:PRINT TAB(8);"- ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI -":PRINT 

60 T1 = 1:T2 = 1:F0R Y = 1 TO 6:PRINT 

70 FOR X = 1 TO 22 

80 IF C(T2> = T1 THEN PRINT TAB(2);LS(T2> :T2 

90 POKE 8,NCX;:P0KE 6,DCX)*28:CALL 768 

100 FOR DE = 1 TO D<X)*5:NEXT DE:T1 = Tl+1:NEXT X,Y 

110 PRINT:PRINT "PRESS <Q> TO QUIT" 

120 PRINT "OR ANY OTHER KEY TO PLAY AGAIN."; 

130 GET K$:IF K* <> "Q" THEN 50 

140 END 

999 REM —MACHINE-LANGUAGE DATA— 

1000 DATA 165,8,74,133,10,164,8,173,48,192,136,234 
1010 DATA 234,208,251,165,7,56,229,10,133,7,176,237 
1020 DATA 198,6,208,233,96 

1999 REM —NOTE DATA— 

2000 DATA 162,1,162,1,128,1,108,1,81,4,96,6 
2010 DATA 96,1,121,1,108,1,96,1,108,9 

2020 DATA IfflS, 1,162, 1,128, 1,108,1, 108,4, 144, 6 
2030 DATA 128,1,121,1,128,1,144,1,162,9 

After you have typed in the above lines, add the data 
statements (lines 2999-32301 from the Adam version. 



M 



ATARI 400/800, 600/800XL, & 130XE/ 

ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI 

10 DIM C(25),D(22),N(22),L$(625),T$C25) 

20 OPEN #1,4,0,"K:":LS=CHR$C32):L$<625)=L$:L$C2)=L$ 

30 FOR X=1 TO 22:READ A,B:NCX)=A:D<X)=B;NEXT X 

40 FOR X=1 TO 25:READ A:C CX>=A:READ T$ 

50 L$(X*25-24)=T$;NEXT X:POKE 82,2:P0KE 752,1 

60 PRINT CHR$(125):P0SITI0N 7,1 

70 PRINT "- ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI -":PRINT 

80 T1=1 :T2=1 :FOR Y=1 TO 6:PRINT 

90 FOR X=1 TO 22:IF CCT2)<>T1 THEN 110 



1M S=T2*25-24:PRINT LS(S,S+24) ;T2=T2+1 

110 SOUND 0,NCX),1«,8:FOR DE=1 TO D<X3*6S:NEXT DE 

120 SOUND 0,0,0,0:T1=T1+1:NEXT X:N£XT Y 

130 PRINT :PRINT "PRESS <Q> TO QUIT" 

140 PRINT "OR ANY OTHER KEY TO PLAY AGAIN."; 

150 GET #1,K:If KOS1 AND K0113 THEN 60 

160 POKE 752,0:END 

1999 REM —NOTE DATA-- 

20M DATA 162,1,162,1,128,1,108,1,81,3,96,5 

2020 DATA 96,1,121,1,108,1,96,1,103,8 

2040 DATA 108,1,162,1,123,1,108,1,108,3,144,5 

2060 DATA 128,1,121,1,128,1,144,1,162,8 

After you have typed in the above lines, add the data 
statements {lines 2999-3230) from the Adam version. 



A 



COMMODORE 64 & 128 (C 64 MODE)/ 

ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI 

10 DIM C(25),DC22),H(22),L<22>,LSC25) 

20 S=54272:F0R X=S TO S+23:P0KE X,0:NEXT X 

30 POKE 53281, 0:POKE S+5,68;P0KE S+6,132:POKE S+24,15 

40 FOR X=1 TO 22:READ H(X),LCX>,DCX):NEXT X 

50 FOR X=1 TO 25:READ CCX),L$(X) :NEXT X 

60 PRINT CHR$n47);TABC7);"- ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI -" 

70 PRINT:T1=1:T2=1:F0R Y=1 TO 6:PRINT 

80 FOR X=1 TO 22 

90 IF C(T2)=T1 THEN PRINT TABCI );L$(T2) : T2=T2+1 

100 POKE S+4,33:P0KE S+1 ,HCX) :P0KE S,L(X) 

110 FOR DE=1 TO DCX)*135:NEXT DE 

120 POKE S+4,32:T1=T1 1-1: NEXT X,Y 

130 PRINT:PRINT "PRESS <Q> TO QUIT" 

140 PRINT "OR ANY OTHER KEY TO PLAY AGAIN,"; 

150 GET K$:IF K$="" THEN 150 

160 IF K$<>"Q" THEN 60 

170 END 

1999 REH —NOTE DATA— 

2000 DATA 12,143,1,12,143,1,15,210,1,18,209,1,25,30 
2010 DATA 3,21,31,5,21,31,1,16,195,1,18,209,1,21,31 
2020 DATA 1,18,209,8,18,209,1,12,143,1,15,210,1,18 
•2030 DATA 209,1,18,209,3,14,24,5,15,210,1,16,195,1 
2040 DATA 15,210,1,14,24,1,12,143,8 

After you have typed in the above lines, add the data 
statements (lines 2999-3230) from the Adam version. 



J 



IBM PC & COMPATIBLES/ON TOP OF 
SPAGHETTI 

r'tis program tias been tested andjound lo wurk on thcjaltawtng computers and 
liardwarc configurations using the BASICS st\oum: [BM PC ir/ColoriGraphtcs Moni- 
tor Adapter or Monochrome Prlnlur Cnrd. w.'Advanced UASIC A2.00. IBM PCjr LU.' 
Cartridge BASIC JJ. 00. Tandy IIXKI wiGW-BASIC 2.02 tierslon 01.01.00. It should 
also work on many other PC compatibles. 

10 DIK CC25>,DC22),NC22),L$(25):KEY OFF 

20 FOR X=1 TO 22:READ N(X>,D<X) :NEXT X 

30 FOR X=1 TO 25:READ C(X>,L$(X) :NEXT X 

40 CLS:PRINT TAB<8);"- ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI -":PRINT 

50 T1=1:T2=1:PLAY "HF" 

60 FOR Y=1 TO 6:PRINT:F0R X=1 TO 22 

70 IF CCT2)=T1 THEN PRINT TAB(2);L$<T2) :T2=T2+1 

80 SOUND N(X),D(X}*3:S0UND 32767, .1 

90 T1=T1+1:NEXT X,Y 

100 PRINT:PRINT "Press <Q> to quit" 

110 PRINT "or any other key to play again." 

120 K$=INKEY$:IF KS="" THEN 120 

130 IF K$<>"Q" AND K$<>"q" THEN 40 ELSE KEY OFF: END 

1999 REH —NOTE DATA— 

2000 DATA 392,1,392,1,494,1,587,1,784,3,659,5 



2010 DATA 659,1,523,1,587,1,659,1,587,8 

2020 DATA 587,1,392,1,494,1,587,1,587,3,440,5 

2030 DATA 494,1,523,1,494,1,440,1,392,8 

After you have typed in the above lines, add the data 
statements (lines 2999-3230) from the Adam version. 



^ 



TANDY COLOR COMPUTER/ON TOP OF 
SPAGHETTI 

10 DIM C(2SJ,DC22),NC22),L$C25) 

20 FOR X=1 TO 22:READ NCX>,D CX) :NEXT X 

50 FOR X=1 TO 25:READ C CX>,L$<X) :NEXT X 

40 CLS:PRINT TABC4);"- ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI -" 

50 T1=1:T2=1 

60 FOR Y=1 TO 6:PRINT:F0R X=1 TO 22 

70 IF CCT2)=T1 THEN PRINT TAB<2);LSCT2) :T2=T2+1 

80 SOUND NCX),D(X)*4:T1=T1+1:NEXT X,Y 

90 PRINT:PRINT "PRESS <Q> TO QUIT" 

100 PRINT "OR ANY OTHER KEY TO PLAY AGAIN."; 

110 K$=INKEY$:IF KS="" THEN 110 

120 IF K$<>"Q" THEN 40 ELSE END 

1999 REM —NOTE DATA— 

2000 DATA 32,1,32,1,78,1,108,1,147,3,125,5 
2010 DATA 125,1,89,1,108,1,125,1,108,8 
2020 DATA 108,1,32,1,78,1,108,1,108,3,58,5 
2030 DATA 78,1,89,1,78,1,58,1,32,8 

After you have typed in the above lines, add the data 
statements (lines 2999-3230) from the Adam version. 



^ 



ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI 



TI-99/4A/ON TOP OF SPAGHETTI 

10 DIM C(25),0(22),N(22),L$C2S) 

20 FOR X=1 TO 22 

30 READ N<X),0(X) 

40 NEXT X 

50 FOR X=1 TO 25 

60 READ CCX),L$(X) 

70 NEXT X 

80 CALL CLEAR 

90 PRINT TAB(2);"' 

100 T1=1 

110 T2=1 

120 FOR Y=1 TO 6 

130 PRINT 

140 FOR X=1 TO 22 

150 IF C(T2)<>T1 THEN 180 

160 PRINT TAB(2);L$(T2) 

170 T2=T2+1 

180 CALL SOUND(O(X)*22O,N(X),0) 

190 T1=T1+1 

230 NEXT X 

210 NEXT Y 

220 PRINT 

230 PRINT 

240 PRINT 

250 CALL KEYC3,K,ST) 

260 IF ST=0 THEN 250 

270 IF K081 THEN 80 

280 END 

1999 REM —NOTE DATA— 

2000 DATA 392,1,392,1,494,1,587,1,784,3,659,5 
2010 DATA 659,1,523,1,587,1,659,1,587,8 

2020 DATA 587,1,392,1,494,1,587,1,587,3,440,5 
2030 DATA 494,1,523,1,494,1,440,1,392,8 
After you have tj'ped in the above lines, add the data 
statements (iines 2999-3230) from the Adam version. 



"PRESS <Q> TO QUIT OR" 

"ANY OTHER KEY TO PLAY AGAIN. 



60 family COMPUrlNG 






MAY 




GRAPHICS 


PRODUCTIVITY 


TIPS TO THE TYPIST 


MORE PROGRAMS IN 




PROGRAM 


PROGRAM 


Page 74 


K.POWER 




Page 62 


Page 66 




Page 57 






How to type in family 




Change a funny face to 


Organize the addresses 


coMPirrrnG's programs. 


Please don't sneeze 




a frightened one with 


and phone numbers of 


and what to do if a 


when you run On Top oj 




Face Cartoon, a 


your friends, family 


program doesn't work. 


Spaghetti in 




graphics program that 


members, or business 




Mlcrotones. 




lets you design your 


contacts with our Micro 








own animated sequence 


Phonebook data-base 








of facia] expressions. 


program. 









Cf.trSTRWTCW -Br JAAtCS CEKSm' III I 






GRAPHICS PROGRAM 



FACE CARTaOM 

BY JOEY LATIMER 





Have you ever thought 
about how easy 11 is to tell 
how someone feels from 
his or her facial expres- 
sions? A frown, a smile, 
or a mean took can com- 
municate an inner fcelinj^. 

Face Cartoon is a pro- 
gram that draws a face on 
the screen and then lets 
you make different facial 
"cartoons" by pressing 
keys that change parts of 
the face. 

For example, the "1" key 
lets you select among four 
types of eyebrows. Press- 
ing the "2" key changes 
the eyes so that they look 
left, right, straight ahead, 
or appear closed. The "3" 
key lets you choose among 
four different mouths. On 
Atari, C 64, IBM PCjr and 
compatible, and VIC-20 
computers, the Face Car- 
toon program lets you use 
the "4" key to change the 
color of the face. 

By altering these facial 
features, it is possible, for 
example, to make your car- 
toon face shift its eyes 
nervously, raise its eye- 
brows in surprise, and 
open and close its mouth 
to simulate conversation. 
The expressions can be 
linked together to create 
an animated sequence. 



To design an original 
cartoon or animated se- 
quence, you simply record 
a series of facial expres- 
sions and then play them 
back. To record, you first 
press the numbered keys 
until you create the facial 
expression you desire, 
and then press the "R" 
key to record the current 
face. Each time you press 
"R." it's like taking a 
snapshot of the screen. 
These "snapshots" are 
stored in sequential order 
and make up a cartoon, 
which can be played back 
at any time by pressing 
the "P" key. The "C" key 
clears memory of any re- 
corded cartoons and re- 
turns the face to its origi- 
nal appearance. Press "C" 
before you record, unless 
you want to add on to a 
previously recorded car- 
toon. 

If you want to see all of 
the expressions possible 
with Face Cartoon, press 
the "A" key. which will 
cause a randomly generat- 
ed cartoon of facial ex- 
pressions to play automat- 
ically. Pressing any key 
stops the random cartoon 
from playing. Pressing the 
"H" key halts the program 
and returns you to BASIC. 



Apple II series/Face Carioon 

10 DIM BRCA,3,5),HOC4,11,4),HT(4) 

20 DIH B>:n00O),BGJ:C100«),E>tt1000),HX<10M) 

30 GR:HOHE:PRINT:GS = CHR$(7) 

40 FOR X = 1 TO 4 

50 READ BR(X,y,Z) 

60 FOR X = 1 TO 4 

70 FOR X = 1 TO 4 

80 READ H0<X,Y,Z5 

90 FOR RO = TO 27:REA[) T:FOR X 

109 READ KO,L,R:COLOR= KO:IF KO 



FOR Y = 1 TO 3; FOR Z = 1 TO 5 

NEXT Z,Y,X 

READ MTCX):NEXT X 

FOR Y = 1 TO MTCX>:FOfi Z = 1 TO 4 

NEXT Z,Y,X 

1 TO T 
1 THEN COL0R= 13 



110 HLIN L,R AT RO:HLIN 39-R,39-L AT RO 

120 NEXT X,R0:COLOR= 6:F0R RO - 28 TO 39 

130 HLIN 0,39 AT RO:NEXT RO 

140 COLOR= 0:VLIN 33,39 AT 6:VLIN 33,39 AT 33 

150 PRINT "1 - 3 A)UTO OLEAR H)ALT PJLAY R)ECORO"; 

160 LB = 0:R = 0:GOSUB 1000:POKE -16368,0 

170 K = PEEK(-16384)-128:IF K < THEN 170 

180 K = K-CK > 96)*CK < 123)*32 

190 POKE -16368, 0:lf K = 72 THEN TEXT:HOHE:END 

200 ON <K <> 65 J GOTO 240: POKE -16368,0 

210 IF PEEKC-163845 < 128 THEN 230 

220 GOSUB 1000: POKE -16368,0:GOTO 170 

230 K = INT(RNDC1)*3)+1:G0SUB 6000:GOTO 210 

240 IF K <> 82 THEN 280 

250 IF R = 1000 THEN PRINT G$;:GOT0 170 

260 R = R+1:B5:(R) = B:EJ:(R) = E 

270 MX(R) = H:8GS(R> = BG:GOTO 170 

280 IF K <> 67 AND K <> 80 THEN 530 

290 GOSUB 1000:IF K = 67 THEN R = 0:GOTO 170 

300 IF R = THEN PRINT GS; :GOTO 170 

310 FOR Q = 1 TO R:B = BJ!(Q):E = E7.(.Q):H = H%(Q) 

320 BG = B6%CQ):G0SUB 2000:NEXT Q:GOTO 170 

330 K = K-48:IF K < 1 OR K > 3 THEN 170 

340 GOSUB 6000: GOTO 170 

1000 B = 1:E = 12:M = 1:BG = 7:G0SUB 2000:R£TURN 

2000 GOSUB 3000: GOSUB 4000:GOSUB 5000: RETURN 

3000 IF B = LB THEN RETURN 

3010 COLOR= 13:F0R X = 2 TO 4:HLIN 10,14 AT X 

3020 HLIN 25,29 AT X:NEXT X:B1 = B:B2 = B 

3030 IF B = 3 THEN Bl = 2:B2 = 3:G0T0 3050 

3040 IF B = 2 THEN Bl = 3:B2 = 2 

3050 COLOR= 8: FOR Y = 1 TO 3: FOR X = 1 TO 5 



^ 



62 KAMILY COMi'UTING 



3060 

3070 

308C 

40W 

4010 

A020 

4030 

50^ 

5010 

5020 

6000 

6010 

6020 

6030 

7000 

7010 

7020 

7030 

7040 

7050 

7060 

7070 

7080 

7090 

7100 

7110 

7120 

7130 

7U0 

7150 

7160 

7170 

7180 

7190 

7200 

7210 

7220 

7230 

7240 
72S0 



If BR(B1,Y,X) = 1 THEN PLOT X+9,Y+1 
IF BRCB2,Y,X) = 1 THEN PLOT X+24,Y+1 
NEXT X,Y:L8 = B:RETURN 
COL0R= 12: FOR X = 11 TO 13 

If X <> E THEN PLOT X,7:PL0T 15+X,7:G0T0 4030 
COL0R= 0:PLOT X,7:PL0T 15+X,7:C0L0R= 12 
■NEXT X: RETURN 

FOR X = 1 TO MTCH):C0L0R= HO(H,X 1) 
HLIN H0(M,X,2),H0CM,X,3) AT H0(H,X,4) 
NEXT X: RETURN 
ON K GOTO 6010,6020,6030 

B = B+1:B = B-Ca = 5)*4:GOSUB 300fl:fiETURN 
E = E+1:E = E-(£ = UJ*3:G0SUB 4000:RETURN 
r.^, "»'';"." ""^" " 5)*4:GOSUB 5000: RETURN 

.^r. ^^^^®'^'*''<''0'®'^^1'1. 1.1-0,0,1,0,0,0,1 

DATA 0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,1,0 8 5) 
DATA 1/0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,1,0,0,0,1,9,7,11,9,9 
DATA H,25, 16,13,14,14,17,9,15, IS, 17,75,16,23,17 
^^rr?S'ti'^;'^^'''"''^'^^'^^'^^ 15 18 9,16,23 
DATA 18,13,24,25,18,13,14,14,16,9,15,24,16,13,25 
DATA 25,16,13,14, 15, 17,9,16,23,17,13,24,25, 17;i3 
.'!!t^ HM'','5''''''''''''^«'21'1^'1^ 22 25 16 
DATA 13,14,16,17,9,17,17,17,13,18,21,17,9,22,22 
DATA 17,13,23,25,17,13,14,17,18,9,18,21,18,13,22 
DATA 25,18,13,14,15,16,9,16,23,16,13,24 25 16 13 
DATA 14,U, 17,9,15, 15, 17,15,16,23,17,9,24,24,17 
DATA 13,25,25,17,9,14,25,18,2,8,2,10,1,11,19,2,8 
DATA 3,8,1,9,19,2,8,3,7,1,8,19,2,8,4,7,1,8,19,3 
DATA 9,3,3,8,4,7,1,8,19,4,9,2,2,1,3,4,8,5,6,1,16 
DATA 18,9,9,2,2,1,3,3,9,4,4,1,5,5,8,6,6,1,7,7,1 
DATA 9,15,1,17,17,9,19,19,6,9,2,2,1,3,3,9,4,4,1 
DATA 5,7,1,9,15,9,18,19,7,9,3,3,1,4,4,9,5,5,1,6 
DATA 7,1,9,15,1,17,17,9,18,19,5,9,3,3,1,4,8,1,10 
DATA 14,1,16,17,9,18,19,6,9,3,3,1,4,4,9,5,5,1,6 
DATA 9,1,15,16,9,17,19,3,9,4,5,1,6,16,9,17,19,3 
DATA 9,4,4,1,5,15,8,16,19,2,1,5,14,8,15,19,1,1,6 
DATA 19,1,1,7,19,1,1,7,19,1,1,8,19,1,1,8,19,1,1 
DATA 9,19,1,1,9,19,1,1,10,19,1,1,11,19,1,1,12,19 
DATA 2,6,2/12,1,13,19,2,6,1,13,1,14,19,2,6,0,14 
DATA 1,15,19,2,6,0,15,1,16,19 



Atari 800, 800XL, & 130XE/Face Cartoon 

10 DIM BRSC60>,EY$(12),HO$t144) 

20 DIM 6(1000), BGC1000),EC1000),MC1000) 

30 PRINT CHR$C125):POKE 752,1 :POKE 712,0:POKE 82,0 

40 FOR X=1 TO 60:READ B:IF B=2 THEN B=32 

50 BR$CX)=CHR$CB):NEXT X 

60 FOR X=1 TO 12:READ B:EY$(X)=CHR$CBJ :NEXT X 

70 FOR X=1 TO 12:REA0 T:FOR Y=1 TO T:READ B,N 

80 FOR Z=1 TO N:H0$CLEN(H0S)+1)=CHRSCB> 

90 NEXT Z:NEXT Y:NEXT X 

100 FOR RO=0 TO 22:S=0:READ T 

110 FOR X=1 TO T:READ CH,N 

120 CH=CH+(CH=0)*160+CCH=2)*30 

130 FOR CO=S TO S+N-1 

140 POSITION CO,RO:PRINT CHR$<CH); 

150 POSITION 39-C0,R0:PRINT CHRStCH); 

160 NEXT CO:S=S+N:NEXT X:NEXT RO:P0SITI0N 1,23 

170 PRINT "1 - 4 A)UT0 OLEAR H)ALT P)LAY RJECORD"; 

188 R=3:G0SUB 1W0:POKE 764,255 

190 K=PEEK(764):IF K=255 THEN 190 

200 POKE 764,255: IF k:<>57 THEN 230 

210 K=PE£KC764):P0KE 710,U8;POKE 712,0 

220 POKE 752,0:PRINT CHR$(125):END 

230 IF K063 THEN 280 

240 IF PEEK(764)=255 THEN 260 

250 POKE 764,255 :GOSUB 10O0:6OTO 190 

260 K=INT(RNDC1)*4)+1:G0SUB 7000 

270 FOR DE=1 TO 30:NEXT DE:GOTO 240 

280 IF KO40 THEN 310 

290 IF R=1000 THEN POKE 712,50:GOTO 190 

300 R=R+1:BCR)=B:E(R>=E:M(R)=H:BG(R)=BG:60T0 190 



310 
320 

330 
340 
350 
360 

370 

380 

390 

1000 

2000 

2010 

3000 

3010 

3020 

3030 

3040 

3050 

4000 

4010 

5000 

5010 

6000 

7000 

7010 

7020 

7030 

7040 

7050 

8000 

8010 

8020 

8030 

8040 

8050 

8060 

8070 

8080 

8090 

8100 

8110 

8120 

8130 

8140 

8150 

8160 

8170 

8180 

8190 

8200 



IF KOI 8 AND KO10 THEN 370 
GOSUS 1000 

IF K=18 THEN POKE 712,72:R=0:POKE 712,0:6OTO 190 

IF R=0 THEN 190 

POKE 712,90:FOR Q=1 TO R:B=B(Q) :E=EC03 .«=H(Q) 

BG=BG(Q):GOSUe 2000:NEXT Q:POKE 712,0-GOTO 190 

K=CK=31 H(K=30)*2 + (K=26)*3+CK=24J*4 

IF K=0 THEN 190 

GOSUe 7000:GOTO 190 

a=1:E=1:f1=1:BG=19:G0SUB 2000:R£TURN 

GOSUB 3000:GOSUB 4000:GOSUB 5000 

GOSUB 6000;RETURN 

B1=B;B2=B:IF B=3 THEN B1=2:e2=3:G0TO 3020 

IF B=2 THEN B1=3:B2=2 

Y=0:FOR X=B1*3-2 TO B1*3;Y=Y+1 

POSITION 10,Y:PRINT aRSCX*5-4,X*5) -NEXT X 

V=0:FOR X=B2*3-2 TO B2*3:Y=Y+1 

POSITION 25,Y:PRINT BR$«*5-4,X*5> :NEXT XrRETURN 

POSITION 11,7:PRINT EY$(E*3-2,£*3) 

POSITION 26,7:PR1NT EY$(E*3-2,E*5) -RETURN 

Y=14:F0R X=H*3-2 TO M*3:Y=Y+1 :P0SIT10N 14, Y 

PRINT M0$(X*12-11,X*12):NEXT X:RETURN 

POKE 710,BG:RETURN 

ON K GOTO 7010,7020,7030,7040 

B=B+1;B=B-<8=5)*4:GOSUB 3000: RETURN 

E=E+1 :E=E-(E=5)*4:G0SUB 4000:fiETURN 
H=H+1:M=t1-(H=5)*4:60SUB 5000:RETURN 
BG=BG+80:IF BG>255 THEN BG=19 
GOSUB 6000:RETURN 

DATA 2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,160,160,160,160,160,2,2 
DATA 160,2,2,2,160,2,2,2,160,2,2,2,2,2,2,160,2,2 
DATA 2,2,2,160,2,2,2,2,2,160,2,2,2,2,2,2,160,160 
DATA 160,2,160,2,2,2,160,60,79,62,79,62,32,32,60 
DATA 79,45,45,45,1,160,12,5,32,1,160,1,32,8,160 
DATA 1,32,1,3,32,2,160,8,32,2,3,32,1,160,10,32,1 
DATA 3,32,2,160,3,32,2,1,32,12,3,32,4,160,4,32,4 
DATA 5,32,3,160,1,32,4,160,1,32,3,3,32,4,160,4 
DATA 32,4,3,32,2,160,8,32,2,5,32,1,160,1,32,8 
DATA 160,1,32,1,1,160,12,3,2,2,64,9,2,9,3,2,3,64 
DATA 7,2,11,3,2,3,64,5,2,12,3,2,4,64,4,2,12,4,2 
DATA -•--'■'---■'-'-'»--->"-»"-' 

DATA 
DATA 
DATA 4, 
DATA 2, 
DATA 1, 
DATA 3, 
DATA 2, 
DATA 
DATA 




Cemmedere 64 & 128 (C 64 mede)/Face Cartoon 

10 DIM BR$(4,3),EY$C4),H0$(4,3) 

20 DIM BC1000),BGC1000),E(1000),M(1000) 

30 BD=53280:CB=55296:SB=1024:PRINT CHR$(147);CHRS(U) 

40 FOR U=1 TO 4:F0R X=1 TO 3:A$="":READ T 

50 FOR Y=1 TO T:READ B:IF 6=2 THEN B=32 

60 AS=AI+CHR$CB):NEXT Y:BRSCW,X)=A$:NEXT X,W 

70 FOR M=1 TO 4:A$="":F0R Y=1 TO 4 

80 READ B:A$=AS+CHR$(B):NEXT Y 

90 EYSCW) = A$:NEXT W 

100 FOR W=1 TO 4:F0R X=1 TO 3: AS="":READ T 

110 FOR Y=1 TO T:READ B,U:IF B=2 THEN B=32 

120 FOR Z=1 TO U:A$=A$+CHR$CB):NEXT Z,Y 

130 HOSCW,X)=A$:NEXT X,M 

140 FOR RO=0 TO 24;S=0:READ T 

150 FOR X=1 TO T:READ KO,CH,N:IF CH=0 THEN CH=160 

160 FOR CO=S TO s+N-1:Y = COM0*RO:7=<39-CO)+40*RO 

170 POKE CB+Y,KO:POKE SB+Y,CH:POKE CE+Z,KO 

180 POKE SB+Z,CH+CCH=233)*10 ^ 

190 NEXT C0:S=S4-N:NEXT X,R0:POKE 214,23:PRINT » 



-€: 



MAY 1987 63 



GRAPHICS PROGRAM, 



200 PRINT SPC<1);CHR$(U4);"1 - 4 A)UTO OLEAR HJALT P 

)LAY RJECORD"; 

210 PH=-1:R=0:POKE BD,12:G0SUB 1000 

220 GET K$:IF K$="" THEN 220 

230 IF K$<>"H" THEN 260 

2i.0 POKE BD,14:P0KE 53231,6 

250 PRINT CHR$(U7);CHR$CU2);CHR$(154):eND 

260 ON -CK$<>"A"> GOTO 3a0:PM=0 

270 GET KS:IF KS<>"" THEN PH=-1 :GOSUB 1000:6OTO 220 

280 K=INTCRND<1)*4)+1:60SUB 7000 

290 FOR DE=1 TO 50:NEXT DEtGOTO 270 

300 IF KS<>"R" THEN 330 

310 IF R=1000 THEN POKE eO,2:GOTO 220 

320 R=R+1:B<R)=B:E(R>=E:HCR)=M:BG{R)=BG:G0T0 220 

330 IF K$<>"C" ANO K$<>"P" THEN 390 

340 GOSUB 1000 

350 IF K$="C" THEN Pa<E BO,U:R=0:POKE BD,12:60T0 220 

360 IF R=0 THEN 220 

370 POKE BD,U:FOR Q=1 TO R:B=B(Q) :E=ECQ) :M=M(Q) 

380 BG=aG(Q):GOSUB 2000:NEXT QjPOKE BD,12:G0T0 220 

390 K=VAL(K$):IF K<1 OR K>4 THEN 220 

A0« GOSUB 7000:GOTO 220 

1000 B=1:E=1:H=1:BG=7:G0SUB 2O00:RETURN 

200« GOSUB 3000:GOSUB 4000:GOSUB 5000 

2010 GOSUB 6000: RETURN 

3000 ai=B:B2=B:IF B=3 THEN Bl=2:B2=3:GOT0 3020 

3010 IF B=2 THEN B1=3:B2=2 

3020 FOR X=1 TO 3 

3030 POKE 214,X:PRINT:PRINT TABC10);BR$(B1 ,X); 

3040 POKE 214,X:PRINT:POKE 211,25:PR1NT BR$CB2,X); 

3050 NEXT X: RETURN 

4000 POKE 214,6:PR1NT:PRINT TABdl ); EYStE); 

4010 POKE 214,6:PRINT:P0K£ 211,26:PRINT EYSCE); : RETURN 

5000 FOR X=1 TO 3:P0i<E 214,X+13:PRINT 

5010 PRINT TAaC14);K0$(H,X);:NEXT X:RETURN 

6000 POKE 53281,66: RETURN 

7000 ON K GOTO 7010,7020,7030,7040 

7010 B=B+1:B=B+<B=5)*4:G0SUB 3000:RETURN 

7020 E=E+1:E=E+(E=5)*4:G0SU8 4a00:RETURN 

7030 H=M+1:M=M+(K=5)*4:G0SUB 5000:RETURN 

7040 BG=BG+1:IF PH THEN BG=BG+CBG=16)*16:G0T0 7070 

7050 BG=BG-(BG=6)-(BG=8)-(BG=10)-(BG=14) 

7060 B6=BG + <BG=16)*15 

7070 GOSUa 6000: RETURN 

8000 DATA 5,2,2,2,2,2,5,2,2,2,2,2,7,18,129,2,2,2,2,2 

S010 DATA 8,2,2,18,129,2,146,2,2,8,2,18,129,2,146,2,2 

8020 DATA 2,8,18,129,2,146,2,2,2,2,8,2,2,18,129,2,146 

8030 DATA 2,2,8,2,2,2,18,129,2,146,2,7,2,2,2,2,18,129 

8040 DATA 2,5,2,2,2,2,2,8,2,18,129,2,2,2,146,2,10,18 

8050 DATA 129,2,146,2,2,2,13,129,2,154,60,111,62,154 

8060 DATA 111,62,32,32,154,60,111,154,45,45,45,3,18,1 

8070 DATA 150,1,32,12,8,2,1,18,1,150,1,2,1,5,1,2,8 

8080 DATA 150,1,2,1,6,2,2,18,1,150,1,2,8,146,1,2,2,6 

8090 DATA 2,1,18,1,150,1,2,10,146,1,2,1,6,2,3,13,1 

8100 DATA 150,1,2,6,146,1,2,3,1,2,12,6,2,4,18,1,150,1 

8110 DATA 2,4,146,1,2,4,11,2,3,18,1,150,1,2,1,146,1,2 

8120 DATA 4,18,1,150,1,2,1,146,1,2,3,6,2,4,18,1,150,1 

8130 DATA 2,4,146,1,2,4,6,2,2,18,1,150,1,2,8,146,1,2 

8140 DATA 2,8,2,1,18,1,150,1,2,1,5,1,2,8,150,1,2,1,3 

8150 DATA 18,1,150,1,2,12,2,0,0,2,8,0,9,2,0,0,3,8,0,6 

8 68 DATA 2,0.0,3,8,0,5,2,0,0,4,8,0,4,3,0,0,3,10,0,1 

8180 DATA 32,3,0,0,1,13,0,0,2,10,0,1,1,32,1,10,0,1,1 





8290 DATA 0,0,9,1,6,0,11, 1,6,0,11, 1,6:0;20,1,m;1 



IBM PC & compatibles w/Color/Craphics Monitor 
Adapter/Face Cartoon 

u;or!c on mnny oilier I'C companbU'S. 

10 DEFINT A-Z:DIM BR$C4,3),EY$C4) ,H0$C4,3) 

20 DIM B(1000),EC1000),«C10OO) 

30 WIDTH 40:LOCATE ,,0:KEY OFF:COLOR 14,0,0:CLS 

40 FOR W=1 TO 4: FOR X=1 TO 3:AS="" 

50 FOR Y=1 TO 5:READ B:IF B=2 THEN B=32 

60 A$=AS+CHR$CB):NEXT Y:BR$(W,X)=A$:NEXT X,U 

70 FOR W=1 TO 4:A$=CHRSC32) 

80 FOR Y=2 TO 4:READ B: A$=A$+CHR$(BJ :NEXT Y 

90 EY$CW)=A$+CHR$(32):NEXT W 

100 FOR U=1 TO 4: FOR X=1 TO 3:A$="":REA0 T 

110 FOR Y=1 TO T:READ B,U 

120 FOR Z=1 TO U:A$=A$+CHR$(8):NEXT Z,Y 

130 HO$(U,X>=A$;NEXT X,W 

140 FOR R0=1 TO 23:S=1:READ T 

150 FOR X=1 TO T:READ KO,N 

160 If <R0=13 OR R0=14) AND X=3 THEN CH=178 ELSE CH=21 

9 

170 FOR C0=S TO S+N-1: COLOR KO 

180 LOCATE R0,C0:PRINT CHRSCCH); 

190 LOCATE R0,41-C0:PRINT CHR$(CH); :NEXT CO 

200 S=S+N:NEXT X,RO: COLOR 14:L0CAT£ 25,2 

210 PRINT "1 - 3 A)uto CKear H)aLt PHay R>ecord"; 

220 KHAX=3:R=0: GOSUB 1000 

230 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 230 

240 V=ASC(K$5:K$=CHR$CV-(V>96)*CV<123)*32) 

250 IF K$="H" THEN COLOR 14,0,0: CLS: END 

260 IF K$<>"A" THEN 300 

270 K$=1NKEY$:IF KSO"" THEN GOSUB 1000:GOTO 250 

280 K=INTCRND(1)*4)+1tG0SUB 7«00 

290 FOR DE=1 TO 40: NEXT DE:GOTO 270 

300 IF K$<>"R" THEN 530 

310 IF R=1000 THEN COLOR 0,SC,4:GOTO 230 

320 R=R+1:B(R)=B:ECR)=E:H<R)=M:G0T0 230 

330 IF K$<>"C" AND K$<>"P" THEN 390 

340 GOSUB 1000 

350 IF K$="C" THEN COLOR 0,SC,0:K=0:GOTO 230 

360 IF R=0 THEN SOUND 400,2 :GOTO 230 

370 COLOR 0,SC,9:FOR Q=1 TO R:B=B(Q) : E=E(Q) :H=H(QJ 

380 GOSUB 200O:NEXT Q:C0LOR 0,SC,0:GOTO 230 

390 K=VAL(K$):IF K<1 OR K>KHAX THEN 230 

400 GOSUB 7000: GOTO 230 

1000 B=1:E=1:M=1:SC=7: GOSUB 2OO0:RETURN 

2000 GOSUB 30«0: GOSUB 4000:GOSUB 5000 

2010 RETURN 

3000 B1=B:82=B:IF B=3 THEN B1=2:B2=3:GOTO 3020 

3010 IF B=2 THEN B1=3:B2=2 

3020 FOR X=1 TO 3 

3030 COLOR 6,7;L0CATE X+2,11:PfiINT BR$(B1,X)' 

3040 LOCATE X+2,26:PRINT BR$<B2,XJ- 

3050 NEXT X:RETURN 

4000 l^OtATE 8,11:C0L0R 1,7:PRINT EYSCE)- 

4010 LOCATE 8,26:PfiINT EY$(E); :RETURN ' 

5000 FOR X=1 TO 3:C0L0R 12,7:L0CATE X+15 15 

5010 PRINT H0$(M,X);:NEXT X:RETURN 

7000 ON K GOTO 7010,7020,7030 

7010 B=B+1:B=B+CB=5)*4:G0SUB 3000:RETURN 

7020 E=E+1:E=E+(E=5)*4: GOSUB 4000 -RETURN 

7030 H=H+1:H=H+CM=S)*4:G0SUB 5000-RETURN 

8000 DATA 2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,219,219,219 219 219 2 ? 

8010 DATA 219,2,2,2,219'2,2 2 219 2 2 I ? ? p > . ',', 

8020 DATA 2,2:2:219:2,2 1 2 2:2;9:l::;;; ::'^', 

8030 DATA 219,2,219,2,2,2,219,60,f9:62,f9 62,32 32 60 
8040 DATA 79,45,45,45,1,219,12,5:32:1,219 1 32 8 219 
8050 DATA 1,32,1,3,32,2 219 8,32:2,3 32 1 219 ie'32 1 
8060 DATA 3,32,2,219,8,32,2 1:32 12,3,32,4,219 4:32 I 
f0^0 DATA 5,32,3,219,1,32,4,219,1,32,3,3 32,4,219 4 
8080 DATA 32,4,3,32,2,219,8,32,2,5,32,1,219 i'32 8 
8090 DATA H19,1,32,1,1,219,12,M,2,6:9:7,K:0!3!6,6 



64 FAMILY COMPUTtNG 



^ 



81W DATA 7,11, 3,8,3, 6, 5, 7, 12, 3,»,A, 6,4, 7, 13, 4, 0,3, 12 
8110 DATA 1,6,3,7,13,7,0,2,12,1,7,2,6,2,0,9,7,3,0,1 
812C DATA 13,0,2,12,1,7,1,12,1,7,1,6,1,7,1,0,1,7,7,0 
8130 DATA 1,7,1,0,1,12,1,9,0,2,12,1,7,1,12,1,7,3,0,1 
8U0 DATA 7,7,0,2,12,2,10,0,3,12,1,7,1,12,1,7,2,0,1,7 
8150 DATA 7,0,1,7,1,12,2,8,0,3,12,1,7,5,0,1,7,5,0,1,7 
8160 DATA 2,12,2,8,0,3,12,1,7,1,12,1,7,4,0,5,7,2,12,3 
8170 DATA 4,0,4,12,2,7,11,12,3,3,0,5,7,11,6,4,3,0,6,7 
8180 DATA 9,6,5,2,0,7,7,13,2,0,8,7,12,2,0,8,7,12,2,0 
8190 DATA 9,7,11,2,0,9,7,11,2,0,10,7,10,2,0,11,7,9,2 
8200 DATA 0,12,7,8,2,0,13,7,7 



MODIFICATION FOR ANOTHER COMPUTER 

IBM PC/r & compatibles/Face Cartoon 

Dili proqmm has been tested ami found to work on iheJaUouitng computers and 
hardware con/lquratlons ustno llie BASICS shown: lUM PC]r w'CaHridge BASIC 
Jl.OO. Tandy nmo ui/GW-iMS/C 2.02 uerslon 01.01.00. 

Use the IBM PC version, with the following alterations; 

Add tines 6000 and 7040-7060. 

6000 PALETTE 7, SC: RETURN 

7040 SC=SC+1:IF PM THEN SC=SC+(SC=16)*16:G0T0 7060 

7050 SC=SC-CSC=1)-(SC=6)-CSC=12>:SC=SC+CS:=16)*15 

7060 GOSUB 6000: RETURN 

Also, change lines 20, 210. 220, 260, 270, 320. 380, 

2010. and 7000 to read as follows: 

20 DIH a(1M0),eGC1000),E(1000),HC10005 

7 1 A DO T LIT IM ^ / * "^ - - -^ ^ • 

Cor feci ! 



V 



>ie 



(^ 






310 

320 

330 

340 

350 

360 

370 

1000 

2000 

3000 

3010 

3020 

3030 

3040 

4000 

4010 

5000 

5010 

6000 

6010 

6020 

6030 

7000 

7010 

7020 

7030 

7040 

7050 

7060 

7070 

7080 

7090 

7100 

7110 

7120 

7130 

7140 

7150 

7160 

7170 

7180 



160 FOR X=1 TO 4:READ A,L:PRINTaA,LEFT$(GUS,L); :NEXT X 
170 FOR X=1 TO 16:READ A,CH:PRINTaA,CHR$(CH); :N£XT X 
180 PRINTa538,STRING$(12,188); 
190 PRINTa970,"1 - 3 AJuto OLear H)aLt PJtay RJecord" 

200 R=0;GOSUB 1000 

210 K$=INKEY$:IF KS="" THEN 210 

220 V=ASC(K$0:KS=CHR$(V-(V>96)*(V<123)*32) 

230 IF K$="H" THEN CLS:END 

240 IF K$<>"A" THEN 280 

250 K$=INKEY$:IF KSO"" THEN GOSUB 100O:GOTO 210 

260 K=RND(4):G0SUB 6000 

270 FOR DE=1 TO 40:NEXT DErGOTO 250 

230 IF K$<>"R" THEN 510 

290 IF R=1000 THEN 210 

300 R=R+1:B(R)=B:E(R)=E:MCR)=H:G0T0 210 



■^ 



F k:$<>"C"AND K$<>"P" THEN 360 

OSUB 1000: IF KS="C" THEN R=0:GOTO 210 

F R=0 THEN 210 

OR Q=1 TO R:B=BCQ)iE=E<Q):H=H(Q) 

OSUB 20O0:NEXT Q:GOT0 210 

,=UALCK$):IF K<1 OR K>3 THEN 210 

OSUB 6000:GOTO 210 

B=1:E=1 :H=1:G0SUB 200©: RETURN 

GOSUB 3000:GOSUB 4O00:GOSUB 5000: RETURN 

B1=B:B2=B:IF B=3 THEN Bl=2:B2=3i60T0 3020 

IF B=2 THEN B1=3:B2=2 

FOR X=1 TO 3:PRINTa21+64*X,BR$CB1,X); 

PRINTa38+64*X,BRS{B2,X); 

NEXT X:RETURN 

PRINTa342,EY$(E); 

PRINTa359,EYI(E5;:RETURN 

FOR X=1 TO 3:PRINT5)602+64*X,MO$tH,X); 

NEXT X:RETURN 

ON K GOTO 6010,6020,6030 

B=B+1 :B=B+(6=5)*4:G0SU8 3000:RETURN 

E=E+1 : E=E+( E=5 )*4 :G0SUB 4000: RETURN 

H=H+1 :H=H+(H=5)*4:GOSUB 5000:RETURN 

DATA 2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,191,191,191,191,191,2,2 

DATA 191,2,2,2,191,2,2,2,191,2,2,2,2,2,2,191,2,2 

DATA 2,2,2,191,2,2,2,2,2,191,2,2,2,2,2,2,191,191 

DATA 191,2,191,2,2,2,191,60,79,62,79,62,32,32,60 

DATA 79,45,45,45,1,191,12,5,32,1,191,1,32,8,191 

DATA 1,32,1,3,32,2,191,8,32,2,3,32,1,191,10,32,1 

DATA 3,32,2,191,8,32,2,1,32,12,3,32,4,191,4,32,4 

DATA 5,32,3,191,1,32,4,191,1,32,3,3,32,4,191,4 

DATA 32,4,3,32,2,191,8,32,2,5,32,1,191,1,32,8 

DATA 191,1,32,1,1,191,12,15,48,78,113,141,178 

DATA 201,202,204,243,245,246,264,267,308,311,328 

DATA 331,337,348,351,352,355,366,372,375,392,395 

DATA 414,415,416,417,436,439,457,458,459,477,478 

DATA 479,480,481,482,500,501,502,524,563,589,626 

DATA 654,689,719,752,784,815,850,877,916,939,268 

DATA 16,292,16,402,10,420,10,273,188,401,131,284 

DATA 176,412,131,349,131,350,131,287,176,288,176 

DATA 353,131,354,131,291,176,419,131,302,188,430 

DATA 131,537,176,550,176 



VIC-20 W/8K or 16K RAM Cartridge/Face Carioon 

10 DIM BR$(4,3),EYSC4),MO$<4,3) 

20 DIM B(100),BGC100),E(100;,H(100) 

30 SB=4096:CB=37888:PRINT CHR$(147);CHRS(14) 

40 FOR W=1 TO 4:F0R X=1 TO 3: A$="":READ T 

50 FOR Y=1 TO T:REAO B:IF B=2 THEN B=32 

60 A$=AS+CHR$CBJ:NEXT Y:BRS(W,X)=A$:NEXT X,W 

70 FOR W=1 TO 4:A$="":F0R Y=1 TO 4 

80 READ B:A$=AS+CHR$(B):NEXT Y 

90 EYSCW)=AS:NEXT W 

100 FOR W=1 TO 4:F0R X=1 TO 3:A$="";READ T 

110 FOR Y=1 TO TiREAD B,U:IF B=2 THEN B=32 

120 FOR Z=1 TO U:A$=A$+CHR$CB):NEXT Z,Y 

130 HO$(W,X)=A$:NEXT X,W 

140 FOR R0=5 TO 22:S=0:READ T 

150 FOR X=1 TO T:READ KO,CH,N;IF CH=0 THEN CH=160 

160 FOR CO=S TO S+N-1 :Y=C0+22*R0:Z=(21-C0)+22*R0 

170 POKE SB+Y,CH:POKE CB+Y,KO 

180 POKE SB+Z,CH+<CH=105)*10:POKE CB+Z,KO 

190 NEXT CO:S=S+N:NEXT X,RO:POKE 214,21 :PRINT 

200 PRINT TAB(5);"1 - 4 A C H P fi"; 

210 PM=0:R=0:GOSUB 1000 

220 GET K$:IF K5="" THEN 220 

230 If K$<>"H" THEN 260 

240 POKE 36879,27 

250 PRINT CHR$C147):END 

260 ON -CK$<>"A") GOTO 300:PH=-t 

270 GET K$:IF K$<>"" THEN PH=-1 :GOSUB 10O0:GOTO 220 

280 K=INTCRND(1)*4)+1;G0SUB 7000 

290 FOR DE=1 TO 60:NEXT DE:GOTO 270 



MAY 19H7 65 



GRAPHICS PROGRAM 



PRODUCTIVITY PROGRAM 



30(5 IF XS<>"R" THEN 330 

310 IF R=100 THEN POKE 36879, BG+2:G0T0 220 

320 R=R+1:B(R)=B:ECR)=E:H(R)=M:BGCR)=BG:S0T0 220 

330 IF KS<>"C" AND K$<>"P" THEN 400 

340 GOSUB 1000 

350 IF K$="C" THEN POKE 36879,BG+7:R=0;GOTO 220 

360 IF R=0 THEN 220 

370 POKE 36879,BG+6:F0R 0=1 TO R:B=BC(1) :E=ECQ) :M=H(Q) 

380 BG=BG(Q}:GOSUB 2000: NEXT Q 

390 POKE 36879, BG+7:G0T0 220 

400 K:=VALtK$):IF K<1 OR K>4 THEN 220 

410 GOSUB 7000:GOTO 220 

1000 B=1:E=1:H=1:BG=248:G0SUB 2000: RETURN 

2000 GOSUB 3000:GOSUB 4000;GOSUB 5000 

2010 GOSUB 6000:RETURN 

300« FOR X=1 TO 3:B1=B:B2=B 

3010 IF B=3 THEN B1=2:B2=3:G0T0 3030 

3020 IF B=2 THEN B1=3:B2=2 

303J) POKE 214,X-1:PRINT:PRINT TAB(2);BR$(ai ,X); 

3040 POKE 214,X-1:PRINT:POKE 211,15:PRINT 8fiS<82,X); 

3050 NEXT X: RETURN 

4000 POKE 214,6:PRINT:PRINT TAB(3);EYS(E); 

4010 POKE 214,6:PRINT:P0KE 211,16:PRINT EY$(E); :SETURN 

5000 FOR X=1 TO 3:P0KE 21 4,X+14:PRINT 

5010 PRINT TABC5);H0S(H,X);:NEXT X:RETURN 

6000 POKE 36879,SG: RETURN 

7000 ON K GOTO 7010,7020,7030,7040 

7010 B=B+1:B=B+(B=5)*4:GOSUB 3000:RETURN 

7020 E=E+1:E=E+(E=5)*4:G0SUB 4000:RETURN 

7030 M=H+1;H=«+CH=5)*4:G0SUB 5000:RETURN 

7040 BG=BG+16:IF PH THEN 7060 

7050 BG=BG-16*CBG=40)-<B6=104) 

7060 If BG>248 THEN BG=8-CPH=0)*16 

7070 G0SU8 600«: RETURN 

8000 DATA 5,2,2,2,2,2,5,2,2,2,2,2,7,18,144,2,2,2,2,2 

8010 DATA 8,2,2,18,144,2,146,2,2,8,2,18,144,2,146,2,2 

8020 DATA 2,8,18,144,2,146,2,2,2,2,8,2,2,18,144,2,146 

8030 DATA 2,2,8,2,2,2,18,144,2,146,2,7,2,2,2,2,18,144 

8040 DATA 2,5,2,2,2,2,2,8,2,18,144,2,2,2,146,2,10,18 

8050 DATA 144,2,146,2,2,2,18,144,2,31,60,111,62,31 

8060 DATA 111,62,32,32,31,60,111,31,45,45,45,3,18,1 

8070 DATA 28,1,32,12,8,2,1,18,1,28,1,2,1,5,1,2,8,28,1 

8080 DATA 2,1,6,2,2,18,1,28,1,2,3,146,1,2,2,6,2,1,18 

8090 DATA 1,28,1,2,10,146,1,2,1,6,2,3,18,1,28,1,2,6 

8100 DATA 146,1,2,3,1,2,12,6,2,4,18,1,28,1,2,4,146,1 

S110 DATA 2,4,11,2,3,18,1,28,1,2,1,146,1,2,4,18,1,28 

8120 DATA 1,2,1,146,1,2,3,6,2,4,18,1,28,1,2,4,146,1,2 

8130 DATA 4,6,2,2,18,1,28,1,2,8,146,1,2,2,8,2,1,18,1 

8140 DATA 28,1,2,1,5,1,2,8,28,1,2,1,3,18,1,28,1,2,12 

8150 DATA 3,0,0,8,1,32,2,0,0,1,4,0,0,1,1,32,7,0,0,2,2 

8155 DATA 3,0,0,8,1,32,2,0,0,1,4,0,0,1,1,32,7,0,0,2,2 

8160 DATA 0,1,5,0,0,1,1,32,7,0,0,1,1,32,1,2,0,1,5,0,0 

8170 DATA 1,1,32,6,0,0,1,1,32,1,2,0,2,6,1,32,1,0,0,1 

8180 DATA 1,32,4,0,0,1,1,32,2,2,0,2,4,1,32,2,0,0,4,1 

8190 DATA 32,2,2,0,3,2,1,32,8,2,0,3,2,1,32,7,0,105,4 

8200 DATA 2,1,32,6,0,105,5,1,1,32,0,1,1,32,0,1,1,32,0 

8205 DATA 1,1,32,0,1,1,32,0,2,6,0,1,1,52,10,2,6,0,1,1 

8210 DATA 1,1,32,0,1,1,32,0,2,6,0,1,1,32,10,2,6,0,1,1 

8220 DATA 32,10,2,6,0,2,1,32,9,2,6,0,3,1,32,8 



MiCRO PHQNBBaOKt AN 
ADDRESS BOOK ON DISK 

Use Our Program to Keep Neat and 
Organized Lists of Friends, Family, and 
Business Contacts 
BY PASOUALE M. CIRULLO 



Have you ever looked up 
someones phone number 
in your address book and 
discovered several different 
numbers listed for the 
same person? That's what 
happened to me last week- 
end. 1 wanted to call a 
friend, but when I looked 
in my phone book, I had 
only his old numbers. Af- 
ter 1 finally tracked down 
his latest number, I decid- 
ed to write Micro Phone- 
book. 

Micro Phonebook is a 
program that will help you 
keep all of your addresses 
and phone numbers neat, 
orderly, and up to date. 
Some of my friends are 
constantly moving and 
changing addresses, so 1 
had entire pages in my ad- 
dress book devoted to just 
one friend. But my Micro 
Phonebook doesn't keep 
old addresses and phone 
numbers that aren't need- 
ed anymore. It erases 
these entries and replaces 
them with the most cur- 
rent information. Micro 
Phonebook will also sort 
your address books any 
way that you want — for ex- 
ample, by first name, last 
name, state, or even area 
code. 

Most address books 
will limit you to two or 
three pages for each letter 
of the alphabet. Micro 
Phonebook allows up to 
120 entries per file, orga- 
nized in any way you 
choose. 'You can even have 
entire files dedicated to 
specific letters. 




USING MICBO 
PHOMCBOOK 

Micro Phonebook uses 
three menus for its com- 
mands: the Main Menu, 
the Rearrange Menu, and 
the Open or Close Menu, 
For all menus, type the 
number of your choice and 
then press RETURN or 
ENTER, 

The Main Menu — the 
first menu you see when- 
ever you run the pro- 
gram — lists the following: 

1. START A NEW 
ADDRESS BOOK 

This option lets you 
start a new address book 
for each member of your 
family or for each salesper- 
son in your office. If you 
choose this option when 
you've been working with 
another address book, and 
you haven't saved your 
changes — the computer 



^Q- 



66 FAMILY COMPUTING 



COMB 



XEROX' 6064 PERSONAL COMPUTER 





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hundreds of business and professional soft- 
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you up and running as quickly as possible 
with computer-aided instruction and supe- 
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you're considering an IBfvl"'-compatible, 
don't be misled by price alone! The system 
we are offering is a complete system... very 
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When you buy this system, your name and 
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Before you buy. ..compare! Xerox® is your 
best value! Check all these features: 

• IBM™-PC/XT Compatibility. 

•256KB Memory Features an BfVIHz Intel 
8086-2 f^icroprocessor for Faster Speed, 
Less Waiting Time. 

• Two 5Va" Floppy Disk Drives, 360K Each. 

• Seven Expansion Slots, Plus a Serial Port 
for Communications or Printer, and 
Parallel Printer Port 

• High- Resolution 640 x 400 Pixels 
l^/lonochrome Monitor, witti 12" Diagonal 
Non-Glare Screen, Swivel and Tilt Base. 

• Standard 83- Key PC Keyboard with 
Mouse Interface (Mouse Not Included.) 

• Comes with Screen Mate", a User 
Friendly Guide to ttie Functions of the 
MS'"-DOS Operating System. 

Screen Mate'" is Menu Driven... No Need 
to Remember Complicated Commands! 




Lets You Select from a Menu and 
Provides Clear On-Une Instructions If 
You're Confused About Your Next Step. 

Complete Tutorial Software and 
Manuals Included: 

• "Getting Started" Booklet 



• Four Reference Guides. 

• Four Software Programs: Two X-Cel" 
Training Disks, Two Diagnostic Disks, 
G'W-BASIC Interpreter, and MS'"- 
DOS/ScreenMate" Operator's Guide. 

• Twenty Blank Disks. 



Over 150 Service Centers Nationally. 



Manufacturer's Limited 90-Day Warranty on i^rt^Labor. 

ustPrice ^2224.80 

Priced At Only 



*999 



Item H-2349-7129-232 Shipping, handling: S49.00 ea. 



Memory Expansion Board for Xerox® 6064 
Personal Computer; Expands the memory to 640K. 



:«249.00 $4^0 

edAt Ji^9 



Ustr 

Priced i 

Item H-2349-71 28-978 Shipping, handling: S3.50ea. 

XEROX" ScfwjnMatfl"" and the identtfytng number* heroin are ttademarkt of XeroK- Cotporanan. 
IBM", IBM" PC, an<j PC"-D05 are tradtmarka ol International Buaineflfl Machine! Corporatk>n. 
MS"-D0S i* a trademarlt ol Microsoft Corporation. 



Toll-Free: 1-800-328-0609 



Credit Card customera can order 

by phone. 24 t\n. a day, 7 day< a week. 



SEND TO: Hem H.2349 

C.O.M.B. Direct Marketing Corp. 

taOS Xenium Lane N/ Minneapolis, MN S5441-4494 

Send Xerox"^ Personal Computer(s) Item H-2349-7129-232 at S999 

each, plus S49 each for ship, handling. 

Send Xerox' Memory Expansion Bciard(s) Item 1-1-2349-7128-978 al 

S129 each, plus S3 50 each for ship, handling. 

(Minnesota residents add 6% sales tax. Sorry, no C.O.D. orders.) 

D My check or money order is enclosed. (No delays in processing 
orders paid by check.) 

Charge: D VISA* D MasterCardg, D Discover^" D American Express® 
Acct. No Exp__Z_ 



PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY 
Name 



Address- 



City - 



Stale . 



-ZIP- 



Phone 



_L 



Sign Here. 



Sales oolside the 4e conSguous stales are subject to special conditions. 
Please call or write to inquire. 



COMBICOIM B CO MB CO M B C OMiBiC O M BiC OM B 



PRODUCTIVITY PROGRAM 



will remind you to save the 
address book before con- 
tinuin|T. 

The computer will ask 
you for each person's last 
name, first name, compa- 
ny, address, city, state, 
and zip code, plus two 
telephone numbers. (The 
line that appears next to 
each prompt shows you 
the maximum length for 
that entry.) One of the ad- 
dress lines can be used to 
hold a tide, such as Asso- 
ciate Manager. Any of 
these lines may be left 
blank, except for the last- 
name line. Leaving this 
line blank is the way you 
tell the computer that 
you're finished giving it 
names. 

If you make a mistake, 
use the DELETE kev 
(CONTROL-B on the Apple 
II or BACKSPACE on the 
IBM) to make your correc- 
tions, or you can make 
your corrections in Sec- 
tion 3 [see below). 

2. ADD TO THIS 
ADDRESS BOOK 

Thi.s selection will let 
you add names to an ad- 
dress book that was al- 
ready started. This option 
is for inserting the name 
and address of a new 
friend or of a new contact 
at work. Do not use it 
when an address or tele- 
phone number that you've 
already typed in changes; 
that's the purpose of op- 
tion number 3. 

3. BROWSE THROUGH 
THIS ADDRESS BOOK 

This is the main section 
of the program. When you 
choose number 3. the 
computer will shovv you 
the first entry in your ad- 
dress book and ask you to 
pick one of seven com- 
mands. These commands 
are Back. Forward. Delete, 
Search, Print, - 9, or 
Exit. 

tDiack. This will display 
the previous entry in the 
address book. If you are al- 
ready at the first entry. 
the computer will display 
that entn,' again. 




<F>Qrward. The computer 
will show you the next en- 
tr}' in your address book 
(if you're not at the end). 

(0>elete. The command 
erases the name and ad- 
dress currently displayed 
on the screen from your 
address book. The com- 
puter will first ask wheth- 
er you are sure you want 
to delete. If you say yes. 
the computer will erase 
the entry, and you will not 
be able to retrieve it. 

iSieaKh, The computer 
will ask you the last name 
of the person you're look- 
ing for. You do not have to 
give the complete last 
name. For example, if you 
type m BRO (or just B) in- 
stead of BROWN, the com- 
puter will display the first 
name beginning with BRO 
(or B] that it finds. 

(pirfnt. The computer will 
print the currently dis- 
played entrj' on paper. 
Make sure that the printer 
is on-line and has paper. 

<0> ■ <9>. If you type in a 
line number (e.g., for 
last name or 6 for state). 
the computer will erase 
that line and let you enter 
new information on that 
line. Use this option to up- 
date phone numbers, ad- 
dresses, names, etc. 

<E>xtt. The computer will 
return you to the main 
menu and ask for your 
next choice. 

4. PRINT THIS 
ADDRESS BOOK 

This option from the 
main menu will print your 
entire address book on pa- 
per. You can then fold it 
up and carry it with you 
or have it for quick refer- 
ence when somebody else 
is using the computer. 

5. REARRANGE THIS 
ADDRESS BOOK 

Choosing this option 
brings you to the second 
of the three menus, the 
Rearrange Menu. This 
menu will let you sort the 
address book on any one 
of the 10 kinds of informa- 
tion: by first name, by last 
name, or even by zip code. 



Just type in the line num- 
ber (from 1 to 10). If you 
enter 1 1. you'll return to 
the main menu. 

6. OPEN OR CLOSE 
AN ADDRESS BOOK 

This option will bring 
you to the third of the 
three menus, the Open 
or Close Menu. This 
menu covers all the opera- 
lions involved with your 
disk. There are five op- 
tions on this menu: 

See the names of your files. 
This will give you a list of 
all the files on your disk. 
The computer will ask you 
which disk drive to look 
at. On the Apple, type D 1 
or D2; on the C 64, type 8 
(for your first drive) or 9; 
and on PC compatibles, 
type A: or B:. (The Macin- 
tosh version will only list 
the files on the disk in the 
internal drive.) 

Open an address book. The 
computer will ask you for 
the name of the address 
book you want to use, and 
then load it into the com- 
puter's memory. 

Close an address book. 
The computer will ask you 
for a file name, and then 



save the address book us- 
ing that name. If you've 
made any changes, make 
sure you save before exit- 
ing the program or turn- 
ing off the computer. 

Erase a tile. The comput- 
er will ask for the name of 
the file to erase and then 
ask you if you are sure you 
want to erase. If you an- 
swer yes, the computer 
vvill permanently erase 
that file from the disk. 
This option can be used to 
erase any flic on your disk, 
not just address-book files. 

Rehim to main menu. This 
option will take you back 
to the main menu, where 
you can continue with 
other operations. 

7. QUIT 

When you are finished 
with the program, the 
computer will first check 
whether you have saved 
the address book you were 
working with. If you did 
not, the computer will ask 
whether you want another 
chance to save it. Once 
you have done so or told 
the computer you don't 
want to save, the program 
will return you to BASIC. 



":NE = e 
S$+CHR$(61):NEXT X 
= UL$+CHR$(95):NEXT X 



Apple 11 series w/48K RAM, disk drive (printer 
optional], & DOS 3.3/Ailero Phonebook 

1© DIM CO<ia),L(10>,MH$<3,12)^NC3),PB$<120,11),RO(10) 

20 FOR X = 1 TO 10:READ ROa),CO(X),L(X) :NEXT X 

30 FOR X = 1 TO 3:READ N<X>:FOR Y = 1 TO N(X) 

40 READ HH$CX,Y):NEXT Y:NEXT X 

50 BL$ = "":FOR X = 1 TO 32:BL$ = BLS+CHR${32) :NEXT X 

60 DS = CHR$CA}:G$ = CHR$t7):FL = 0:F$ 

70 S$ = "":FOR X = 1 TO 40: S$ = 

80 UL$ = "":FOR X = 1 TO 32:UL$ 

90 « = 1;FA = 0:GOSUB 4000 

100 ON A GOTO 130,170,390,910,990,119,1270 

110 H = 2:G0SUB 4000:ONERR GOTO 2000 

120 ON A GOTO 1050,1090,1140,1190,90 

130 If FL = THEN 170 

140 GOSUB 50fl0:INPUT "";Z 

150 ON Z GOTO 110,160:GOTO 140 

160 NE = 0:FS = "" 

170 GOSUB 3000:FL = 1:IF ME = 120 THEN 360 

180 PRINT "PRESS <RETURN> AT THE END OF EACH" 

190 PRINT "LINE. TO LEAVE A LINE BLANK, JUST" 

200 PRINT "PRESS <ENTER>. LEAVE THE LAST NAME" 

210 PRINT "LINE BLANK WHEN YOU HAVE NO MORE" 

220 PRINT "NAMES TO AD0.":PR1NT:PR1NT 

230 FOR X = 1 TO 10:VTAB 7+X:HTAB 1 

240 PRINT MM$(3,X>;:NEXT x 

250 NE = NE+1:PB$(NE,11) = "" 

260 FOR X = 1 TO 10:VTAB 7+X:KTAB 14 

270 PRINT LEFT$(BL$,L(X)):NEXT X 

280 FOR X = 1 TO 10:R = 7+X:C = 14 

290 GOSUB 7000:PB$CNE,X) = T$ 

300 IF PB$(NE,1) = "" THEN NE = NE-1:X = 10;FA = 1 



eS- 



68 FAMILY COMPUTiNti 



310 NEXT X:PRINT:IF FA = 1 THEN 9© 

320 WS = "":FOR Y = 1 TO LENCPB$CNE,1>) 

330 P = ASCtHID$Cpa$(NE,1),Y,1)) 

340 W$ = W$+CHR$<P-32*(P > 96)*CP < 1Z3)) 

350 NEXT Y:PBStNE,11> = W$;If NE < 120 THEN 250 

360 PRINT "YOU HAVE REACHED THE LIMIT" 

370 PRINT "SAVE IT TO DISK AND START ANOTHER." 

380 G05UB 6008: GOTO 90 

390 GOSUB 3000: SF = 1:IF NE <> THEN 420 

l*m PRINT "THERE IS NO ADDRESS BOOK TO BROWSE" 

410 PRINT "THROUGH.": GOSUB 6000: GOTO 90 

420 GOSUB 3000 :FL = 1 

430 VTAB 2:HTAB 12:PRINT "MICRO PHONEBOOK" 

440 FOR X = 1 TO 10: VTAB ROCX):HTAB C0CX)-3 

450 PRINT STRS(X-I);": ";:NEXT X 

460 FOR X = 1 TO 10: VTAB ROCX):HTAB C0CX5 

470 PRINT LEFT$CBL$,L(X));:VTAB RO(X):HTAB COCX> 

480 PRINT PBS(SF,X);:NEXT X:VTAB 14:HTAB 1 

490 PRINT "CHOOSE FROM THE FOLLOWING COMMANDS:" 

500 PRINT "<B>ACK, <F>ORWARD, <D>ELETE, <S>EARCH," 

510 PRINT "<P>R1NT, ITEK <0-9> TO REDO, OR <E>XIT." 

520 Z$ = "":VTAB 17:HTAB 1: PRINT BLS; 

530 VTAB 17:HTAB 1:PRINT "COMMAND: ";:GET Z$ 

540 PRINT Z$:C = 0:FOR Z = 1 TO 6 

550 IF MID$<"BFDSPE",Z,1) = Z$ THEN C = Z:Z = 6 

560 NEXT Z:ON C GOTO 600,620,640,730,870,90 

570 IF Z$ < "0" OR Z$ > "9" THEN 520 

580 X - VALCZ$)+1:R = ROCX):C = C0(X):GOSUB 7000 

590 P8$(SF,X> = T$:G0T0 520 

600 IF SF = 1 THEN PRINT G$:60T0 520 

610 SF = SF-1:G0T0 460 

620 IF SF = NE THEN PRINT GS:G0T0 52© 

630 Sf = SF+1:G0T0 460 

640 VTAB 20:HTAB 1: PRINT "ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT" 

650 PRINT "TO DELETE THIS ENTRY? "; 

660 GET Z$:IF ZS <> "Y" AND Z$ <> "N" THEN 660 

670 PRINT Z$:IF Z$ = "N" THEN 420 

680 IF SF = NE THEN NE = NE-1:SF = NE:60T0 710 

690 FL = 1:F0R X = SF TO NE-1 : FOR Y = 1 TO 11 

700 PB$(X,V) = PB$(X+1,Y):NEXT Y:NEXT X:NE = NE-1 

710 IF NE = THEN HOME:FS = "":GOTO 400 

720 GOTO 420 

730 VTAB 20:HTAB 1:PRINT "WHAT LAST NAME DO YOU WANT" 

740 INPUT "TO FIND? ";SS$:IF SS$ = "" THEN 730 

750 W$ = "":FOR Y = 1 TO LEN(SS$) 

760 P = ASC(MID$CSSS,Y,1)) 

770 W$ = W$+CHRSCP-32*(P > 96)*(P < 123)>:NEXT Y 

780 W = 0:LW = LEN{W$):FOR X = 1 TO NE 

790 IF W$ = LEFT${PB$(X,11},LW) THEN W = X:X = NE 

800 NEXT X:IF W <> THEN SF = W:GOTO 420 

810 VTAB 22:HTAB 1 

820 PRINT "SORRY, 1 CAN'T FIND THE NAME ";SS$;"," 

830 PRINT "DO YOU WANT TO TRY AGAIN? "; 

840 GET ZS:IF Z$ <> "Y" AND Z$ <> "N" THEN 840 

850 PRINT Z$:IF Z$ = "N" THEN 420 

860 VTAB 22:HTAB 1: PRINT BLS: PR INT BL$:GOT0 730 

870 VTAB 20:HTAB 1:G0SUB 8000 

880 GET Z$:PRINT Z$:IF Z$ <> "Y" GOTO 420 

890 X = SF:PRINT D$;"PR#1":G0SUB 900« 

900 PRINT DS;"PR#0":GOTO 420 

910 GOSUB 3000: IF NE <> THEN 940 

920 PRINT "THERE IS NO ADDRESS BOOK TO PRINT." 

930 GOSUB 6000: GOTO 90 

940 HOME: GOSUB 8000 

950 GET Z$:PRINT Z$:IF Z$ <> "Y" THEN 90 

960 PRINT D$;"PR#1":PRINT TAB( 12); "MICRO PHONEBOOK" 

970 PRINT: FOR X = 1 TO NE: GOSUB 9000: NEXT X 

980 PRINT D$;"PRS0": GOSUB 6000: GOTO 90 

990 M = 3: GOSUB 4000: IF A = 11 THEN 90 

1000 FL = 1:F0R U = 1 TO NE-1: FOR V = U+1 TO NE 

1010 IF PB$<U,AJ <= PB$CV,A) THEN 1040 

1020 FOR Y = 1 TO 11:V$ = P6$(U,Y):PB$<U,Y) = P8$(V,Y) 

1030 PB$<V,Y) = V$:NEXT Y:NEXT V:NEXT U 

1040 A = FREC0):GOTO 90 ^ 



COMMODORE APPLE 



C-64 



.S^ 






•WITH PURCHASE OF SPECIALLY 
PRICED SOFTWARE 



C-128 




FULLY WARRANTY 

FACTORY SERVICED 



*WITH PURCHASE OF 1571 
COMMODORE DISK DRIVE 



AMIGA 




^.-4 ^^ 



l^^;^^,y).\H 



^ $7QC 




*99 ADDITIONAL FOR MONITOR 



PRINTER 




SEIKOSHA 

NEAR LETTER ,100 CPS DRAFT 

QUALITY '20 CPS NEAR •COMMODORE READY 



DISKETTES 




DSDD PER PACK OF 1C 



PRO-TECH-TRONICS 

BS6Q Shingle Creek Parkway #201 

Minneapolis. MK 55430 
QUICK 



DELIVERY 



SH M 



1-800-345-5080 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 28 



PRODUCTIVITY PROGRAM 




1050 INPUT "WHAT DRIVE ARE THE FILES IN ? ";DRS 

1060 HOHErIF DR$ = "" THEN PRINT D$;"CATALOG": PRINT:GO 

SUB 6aW:G0T0 110 

1C70 DR$ = "CATALOG,"+DR$: PRINT D$;DR$ 

1080 PRINT:GOSUB 6000:GOTO 110 

1090 INPUT "ENTER FILENAME; ";F$:IF F$ = "" THEN 90 

1100 PRINT D$; "OPEN"; F$: PRINT D$;"R£AD";FS 

1110 INPUT NE:FOR X = 1 TO NE;FOR Y = 1 TO 11 

1120 INPUT PB$(X,Y):NEXT Y:NEXT X 

1130 PRINT D$; "CLOSE"; F$: GOTO 90 

1140 INPUT "ENTER FILENAME: ";F$:IF F$ = "" THEN 90 

1150 FL = 0:PRINT D$;"OPEN";F$:PRINT D$;"WRITE"; F$ 

1160 PRINT NE:FOR X = 1 TO NE:FOR Y = 1 TO 11 

1170 PRINT PB$(X,Y):NEXT Y:NEXT X 

1180 PRINT D$; "CLOSE"; FS: GOTO 90 

1190 INPUT "WHAT FILE DO YOU WANT TO DELETE' "-FS 

1200 IF FS = "" THEN 90 

1210 PRINT "ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO DELETE ";F$;"?"- 

1220 GET ZS:IF 1$ <> "Y" AND Z$ <> "N" THEN IZZs' 

1230 PRINT Z$:IF Z$ = "N" THEN 90 

1240 PRINT D$;"DEL£TE";F$ 

1250 PRINT F$;" HAS BEEN DELETED." 

1260 GOSUB 6000:GOTO 90 

1270 IF FL = 6 OR NE = THEN 1300 

1280 GOSUB 5000: INPUT "";Z 

1290 ON Z GOTO 110,1300:GOTO 1280 

1300 HOME: END 

1999 REM —ERROR CHECKING ROUTINES— 

2000 PRINT "I/O ERROR. CHECK DISK AND DISK DRIVE." 
2010 POKE 216,0:GOSUB 6000:GOTO 110 

2999 REM —CLEAR SCREEN SUBROUTINE— 

3000 HOKE;IF FS = "" THEN NFS = "UNNAMED" 
3010 VTAB 24:HTAB 1 

3020 PRINT "ADDRESS BOOK: ";NF$; 

3030 IF FL = 1 THEN PRINT " CNOT SAVED)"; 

3040 VTAB 1:HTAB 1: RETURN 

3999 REM —MENU SUBROUTINE— 

4000 GOSUB 3000:PRINT:PRINT SS 
4010 TA = (40-LEN(MM$(H,N(M))))/2 
4020 PRINT TAB(TA);MHS(M,N(M)):PR1NT 

4030 FOR X = 1 TO NCM)-1:IF X = 11 THEN PRINT 

4040 PRINT TAe(3-(X > 9));X;") ";HM$<M,X) 

4050 NEXT X:PRINT:PRINT S$:INPUT "CHOICE: ";A 

4060 IF A < 1 OR A > NtM)-1 THEN 4000 

4070 RETURN 

4999 REM —NOT SAVED SUBROUTINE— 

500« POKE 216,0:VTAB 16:HTAB 1 

5010 PRINT "YOU DID NOT CLOSE THE CURRENT ADDRESS" 

5020 PRINT "BOOK. ENTER <1> FOR ANOTHER CHANCE TO" 

5030 PRINT "SAVE, OR ENTER <2> TO ERASE THE" 

5040 PRINT "CURRENT ADDRESS BOOK: ";:RETURN 

5999 REH —ANY KEY SUBROUTINE— 

6000 PRINT TABC7);"PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTINUE," 
6010 GET Z$:RETURN 

6999 REM —EDITOR SUBROUTINE— 

7000 T$ = "":TL = 

7010 VTAB R:HTAB C:PRINT LEFT$CULS,L(X) ) 

7020 VTAB R:HTAB C: PR INT T$; 

7030 IF TL <> LCX) THEN PRINT CHR$C95); 

7040 VTAB R:HTAB C+TL 

7050 GET K$:IF K$ <> CHR$(13) THEN 7080 

7060 VTAB R:HTAB C+TL 

7070 PRINT LEFT5CBLS,L<X)-TL+1):RETURN 

7080 IF KS <> CHR$<2) AND KS <> CHRSt127) THEN 7120 

7090 If TL = THEN PRINT GS;:GOTO 7050 

7100 TL = TL-1:1F TL = THEN TS = "":GOTO 7020 

7110 T$ = LEFTSCT$,TL):GOTO 7020 

7120 IF KS <- CHR$C32) OR LEN(T$) = LCX) THEN PRINT GJ; 

:GOTO 7050 

7130 TS = T$+K$:TL = TL+1:G0T0 7020 

7999 REH —PRINT SUBROUTINES-- 

8000 PRINT "PRESS <Y> WHEN THE PRINTER IS READY OR" 
8010 PRINT "ANY OTHER KEY TO CANCEL PRINTING."; 
8020 RETURN 



9000 

9010 

9020 

9030 

9040 

9050 

9060 

9070 

9999 

10000 

10010 

10999 

11000 

11010 

11020 

11030 

11040 

11050 

11060 

11070 

11080 

11090 

11100 

11110 

11120 

11130 

11140 



PRINT 

FOR Y 

PRINT 

IF Y = 

IF Y = 

PRINT: 

IF Y = 

NEXT Y 

REH — 

DATA 

DATA 

REH - 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 

DATA 



PB$CX/2>;" ";PB$(X,1) 
= 3 TO 10:If PBSCX.Y) = "" THEN 9060 
PBSCX,Y); 
■■ 6 THEN PRINT ", ";:GOTO 9070 

7 THEN PRINT " ";;GOTO 9070 
GOTO 9070 

8 OR Y = 9 THEN PRINT 
:PRINT:RETURN 
LOCATION DATA— 

5,4,15,5,24,15,6,4,26,7,4,26,8,4,26 
9,4,15,9,24,2,9,32,5,10,4,26,11,4,26 

MENU DATA— 
8,START A NEW ADDRESS BOOK 
ADD TO THIS ADDRESS BOOK 
BROWSE THROUGH THIS ADDRESS BOOK 
PRINT THIS ADDRESS BOOK 
REARRANGE THIS ADDRESS BOOK 
OPEN OR CLOSE AN ADDRESS BOOK, QUIT 
MICRO PHONEBOOK 
6,SEE THE NAMES OF YOUR FILES 
OPEN AN ADDRESS BOOK 

CLOSE THE CURRENT ADDRESS BOOK, ERASE A FILE 
RETURN TO THE MAIN MENU, DO YOU WANT TO... 
12, LAST NAME, FIRST NAH£,COHPANY, ADDRESS #1 
ADDRESS *2,C1TY,STATE,ZIP CODE,HOHE NUHBER 
WORK NUMBER, RETURN TO MAIN HENU 
ARRANGE ACCORDING TO... 



Commodore 64 & 128 (C 64 mode) w/disk drive 
(printer optionaiJ/Mfcro Phonebook 

10 DIM COC10),L(10),HH$(3,12),N(3),PB$(120,11),RO(10) 

20 FOR X=1 TO 10:READ RO<X),CO(X),L(X) :NEXT X 

30 FOR X=1 TO 3:READ N(X):FOR Y=1 TO N(X) 

40 READ HH$(X,Y):NEXT Y:NEXT X 

50 BL$="":FOR X=1 TO 39:BLS=BL$+CHR$(32) :NEXT X 

60 FL=0:FS="":NE=0:POKE 53280,14 

70 S$="":FOR X=1 TO 40: SS=SS+CHR$(96):NEXT X 

80 UL$="":FOR X=1 TO 40:UL$=UL$+CHR$(164):NEXT X 

90 H=1:FA=0:GOSUB 5000 

100 ON A GOTO 130,170,380,930,1010,110,1430 

110 M=2:G0SUB 5000 

120 ON A GOTO 1070,1190,1260,1350,90 

130 IF FL=0 THEN 170 

140 GOSUB 6000: INPUT Z 

150 ON Z GOTO 110,160:GOTO 140 

160 NE=0:DF$="" 

170 GOSUB 4000:FL=1:IF NE=120 THEN 350 

180 PRINT "PRESS <ENTER> AT THE END OF EACH" 

"LINE. TO LEAVE A LINE BLANK, JUST" 
"PRESS <ENTER>. LEAVE THE LAST NAME" 
"LINE BLANK WHEN YOU HAVE NO MORE" 
"NAMFS TO AOD.":PRINT:PRINT 
1 TO 10:POKE 214,7+X:PRINT 

240 PRINT HH$(3,X);:N£XT X 

250 NE=NE+1:PB$(NE,11)="" 

260 FOR X=1 TO 10:POKE 214,7+XrPRINT 

270 PRINT TA6(12);LEFTS<BL$,L(X)):NEXT X 

280 FOR X=1 TO 10:R=7+X:C=12:GOSUB 9000:PB$(NE,X)=T$ 

290 IF PB$(NE,1>="" THEN NE=NE-1 :FA=1 :X=10 

300 NEXT X:IF FA=1 THEN 90 

310 FOR Y=1 TO LENCPB$<NE,1)) 

320 P=ASC(MI0$CPBS(NE,1),Y,1)) 

330 PB$CNE,11)=PBS(NE,11 )+CHR$(P-32*(P>96)*<P<123) ) 

340 NEXT Y:IF NE<120 THEN 250 

350 PRINT "YOU HAVE REACHED THE LIHIT" 

360 PRINT "SAVE IT TO DISK AND START ANOTHER." 

370 GOSUB 7000: GOTO 90 

380 GOSUB 4000:SF=1:IF NE<>0 THEN 410 

390 PRINT "THERE IS NO ADDRESS BOOK TO BROWSE" 

400 PRINT "THROUGH. ":GOSUB 7000:GOTO 90 

410 GOSUB 4000:FL=:1 :POKE 214,2:PRINT 

420 PRINT TAB(12);"HICR0 PHONEBOOK" 



190 PRINT 
200 PRINT 
210 PRINT 
220 PRINT 
230 FOR X- 



70 KAMILV COMPUTING 



430 FOR X=1 TO 10:POKE 21 A^ROCX) :PR1NT 

440 PRINT TAB(C0CX)-3);RIGHT$(STR$(X-1),1);"; "; 

450 NEXT X 

460 FOR X=1 TO 10:POKE 2U,R0(X) :PRINT 

470 PRINT TABCCOCX));LEFT$<aLI,L(Xn; 

480 POKE 2U,R0(X):PRINT 

490 PRINT TAB<CO(X));PBSCSF,X);:NEXT X 

500 POKE 2U,13:PRINT 

510 PRINT "CHOOSE FROM THE FOLLOWINS COMMANDS:" 

520 PRINT "<B>ACK, <F>ORWARD, <D>ELETE, <S>EARCH," 

530 PRINT "<P>RINT, ITEM <0-9> TO REDO, OR <£>XIT." 

540 Z$="":POKE 214,16:PRINT:PR1NT BLS; 

550 POKE 214,16:PRINT:PRINT "COMMAND: "; :GOSUB 8000 

560 PRINT Z$:C=0:FOR Z=1 TO 6 

570 IF HI0$<"BF0SPE",Z,1)=Z$ THEN C=Z:Z=6 

580 NEXT Z:ON C GOTO 620,640,660,750,890,90 

590 IF r$<"0" OR IS>"g" THEN 540 

600 X=VALCZ$)+1 :R=RO(X):C=CO(X):GOSUB 9000 

610 PB$(SF,X)=T$:GOTO 540 

620 IF SF=1 THEN 540 

630 SF=SF-1:GOT0 460 

640 IF SF=NE THEN 540 

650 SF=SF+1:G0T0 460 

660 POKE 214,18:PRINT:PRINT "ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT" 

670 PRINT "TO DELETE THIS ENTRY? "; 

680 GOSUB 8000: IF Z$<y'Y" AND Z$<>"N" THEN 680 

690 PRINT Z$:IF Z$="N" THEN 410 

700 IF SF = NE THEN NE=NE-1 : SF=NE:GOTO 730 

710 FL=1:F0R X=SF TO N£-1;F0R Y=1 TO 11 

720 PBSCX,Y)=PBS(X+1,Y):NEXT YiNEXT X:NE=NE-1 

730 IF NE=0 THEN PRINT CHR$C147); :F$="":60T0 390 

740 GOTO 410 

750 W=0:POKE 214,18:PRINT 

760 PRINT "WHAT LAST NAME DO YOU WANT" 

770 INPUT "TO FIND";SS$:IF SS$="" THEN 750 

780 W$="":FOR Y=1 TO LEN(SS$>:P=ASC(HIDSCSS$,Y,1 )) 

790 W$=W$+CHR$(P-32*CP>96)*CP<123)):NEXT Y 

800 FOR X=1 TO NE 

810 IF W$=LEFT$<PB${X,11),LEN(W$>> THEN W=X:X=NE 

820 NEXT X:IF WO0 THEN SF=W:GOTO 410 

830 POKE 214,20:PRINT 

840 PRINT "SORRY, I CAN'T FIND THE NAME ";SS$;"." 

850 PRINT "DO YOU WANT TO TRY AGAIN? "; 

860 GOSUB 8000: IF ZS<>"Y" AND Z$<>"N" THEN 860 

870 PRINT Z$:IF Z$="N" THEN 410 

880 POKE 214,20:PRINT:PRINT BL$:PRINT BL$:GOTO 750 

890 POKE 214,18:PRINT:GOSUB 10000 

900 GOSUB 8000:PRINT Z$:IF 2$<>"Y" GOTO 410 

910 X=SF:OPEN 4,4:G0SUB 11000 

920 CLOSE 4:G0T0 410 

930 GOSUB 4000: IF NEO0 THEN 960 

940 PRINT "THERE IS NO ADDRESS BOOK TO PRINT." 

950 GOSUB 7000:GOTO 90 

960 PRINT CHR$(147);:G0SUB 10000 

970 GOSUB 8000:PRINT ZS:IF 2$<>"Y" THEN 90 

980 OPEN 4,4:PRINTS4,TAaC12);"HKR0 PH0NEB00K":PRINT#4 

990 FOR X=1 TO NE:GOSUa 11000:NEXT X 

1000 CLOSE 4;G0T0 90 

1010 M=3:G0Sue 5000: IF A=11 THEN 90 

1020 FL=1:F0R U=1 TO NE-1:F0R V=U+1 TO NE 

1030 IF PB$(U,AK=PB$CV,A) THEN 1060 

1040 FOR Y=1 TO 11 :VS=PB$CU,Y):PB$CU,Y)=PB$CV,Y) 

1050 PB$CV,Y)=VS:NEXT Y 

1060 NEXT VrNEXT U:A=FRE(0) :GOTO 90 

1070 INPUT "WHAT DRIVE ARE THE FILES IN, 8 OR 9";DR 

1080 IF DR=0 THEN DR=8:G0T0 1100 

1090 IF DR<8 OR m>9 THEN 110 

1100 PRINT CHR$<U7); :CLOSE 2:0PEN 2,DR,0,"I":CLOSE 2 

1110 CLOSE 15:0PEN 15,DR,1 5: INPUT#1 5,ER,ER$:CL0SE 15 

1120 IF ER<>0 THEN GOSUB 3000:GOTO 110 

1130 OPEN 2,DR,0,"$":PRINT "DISK NAME: "; 

1140 GET#2,T$:IF T$=CHR$C199) THEN 1180 

1150 IF T$=CHR$(34) THEN F=NOT F:ON ABSCF) GOTO 1140:P 

fiINT:GOTO 1140 




AN OPPORTUNITY UNLIKE 
ANY OTHER 




The nation's largest computer camp 
offers all traditional camping activities 
and camaraderie in a beautiful setting. 
Your child will have exclusive use of a 
major l>rand microcomputer for at least 6 
flours every day. 

An experienced staff ratio of one to 
three and a computer ratio of one to one 
uncaps the creativity of young people. 
Students receive hands-on experience in 
robotics, graphics, color, sound, 
languages and tefecommunications. 

Complete details on the 1, 2, 4, and 8, 
week coed sessions for ages 8-18 are 
available in a free brochure. Call or 
write for yours! 

Call (317) 297-2700 or write to 

MIDWEST COMPUTER CAMP 

9332 Lataysttg Road. Unit C3, Indianapolis, IN 462rS 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 23 




PROTECH™ YOUR DISKS 

With a Better Travel and Storage System! 

Five reinforced, heav)'-duly, anti-slulic vinyl jackets. Flach hold fourS-l/4" 
floppy disks (20 disks total storage). These jackel!> can be stored or used in- 
dependenlly of (he premiuin quality ring binder included. MLxand match units 
to build the system that meets your needs. 

You |;el maximum protection, versatility and convenience. Toss, turn and flip 
them, the disks can't fall out. These jacliels travel well in an attache cane, even 
use them a.s u mailer. They storeonlopofadcskorcanbchunginanie cabinet 

or draw. Color coded for fast, easy identification. Only $29.50 per unit. 

I — — — — — 

I Send check or money order to: 

Penn Linden Co. 

71 1 Pennsylvania Ave. • Linden. IM.J 07036 1-800-637-4928 

Please send me unils ®" S29.50each- 1 have added S4,SQ shipping & handling and 

have enclosed the omouni ol (N J.S Besidenis — add6%saleslax ) 

Nam© 

Address 

Cttv 



. Stole . 



Telephone ( ) 

r MasterCard L! Visa 
Exp. Dote 



Zip . 



_ Color Choice D tulixed U Black □ Blue C Grey 



Signoture 
Acct* _ 



I I I I I I 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 25 



MAY 1987 71 



PRODUCTIVITT PROGRAM 



1160 IF F THEN PRINT TS; 

1170 GOTO 1140 

1188 CLOSE 2:PRINT:G0SUB 7!>0O:GOTO 110 

1198 GOSUB 8020: INPUT "ENTER FILENAME: ";0F$ 

1200 IF t)F$="" THEN 110 

1210 f$="0:"+DFS+",S":GOSUB 200fl 

1220 IF ER<>0 THEN GOSUB 3000:GOTO 120 

1230 OPEN 2,8,2, F$+",R" 

1240 INPUT#2,NE:F0R X=1 TO NErFQR Y=1 TO 11 

1250 INPUT#2,PB$<X,Y):NEXT Y:NEXT X:CL0SE 2:G0TO 90 

1260 GOSUB 8020:INPUT "ENTER FILENAME: ";DF$ 

1270 IF DF$="" THEN 110 

1280 F$="0:"+OF$+",S":FL=0:GOSUB 2000 

1290 IF ER<>0 AND ER<>62 THEN GOSUB 3000:GOTO 120 

1300 IF £R=0 THEN F$="a"+FS 

1310 OPEN 2,8,2,F$+",U" 

1320 PRINT#2,NE:F0R X=1 TO NE:FOR Y=1 TO 11 

1330 IF PB$CX,Y)="" THEN PB$CX,Y)=CHR$(32) 

1340 PfiINT#2,PB$CX,Y):NEXT Y:NEXT X:CLOSE 2:60T0 90 

1350 INPUT "WHAT FILE 00 YOU WANT TO DELETE";F$ 

1360 IF F$="" THEN 110 

1370 PRINT "ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO DELETE ";F$;"?"; 

13S0 GOSUB 8000: IF Z$<>"Y" AND Z$<>"N" THEN 1380 

1390 PRINT 2$: IF 2S="N" THEN 90 

1400 GOSUB 2000: IF ER<>0 THEN GOSUB 300O:GOTO 110 

1410 OPEN 15,8,15,"S0:"+F$:CLOSE 15 

1420 PRINT F$;" HAS BEEN DELETED. "jGOSUB 7000:GOTO 90 

1430 IF FL=0 OR N£=0 THEN 1460 

1440 GOSUB 6000: INPUT I 

1450 ON Z GOTO 110,1460:GOTO 1440 

1460 PRINT CHR$<147);:EN0 

1999 REM —ERROR CHECKING ROUTINES-- 

2000 CLOSE 2:0PEN 2,8,2,F$+",R":CL0SE 2 

2010 CLOSE 15:0PEN 15,8,15: INPUT)!(15,ER,Efi$:CL0SE 15 
2020 RETURN 

3000 PRINT "I/O ERROR. CHECK DISK AND DISK DRIVE." 
3010 GOSUB 7000: RETURN 

3999 REM —CLEAR SCREEN SUBROUTINE— 

4000 PRINT CHR$(147); :NF$=DFI 
4010 IF DF$="" THEN NFS="UNNAMED" 

4020 POKE 214,23:PRINT:PRINT "ADDRESS BOOK: ";NF$; 
4030 IF FL=1 THEN PRINT " (NOT SAVED)"; 
4040 POKE 214,0:PRINT:fiETURN 

4999 REM —MENU SUBROUTINE— 

5000 GOSUB 4000;PRINT:PRINT SS 
5010 TA=C40-LEN<MM$(M,N(M))))/2 
5020 PRINT TAB(TA);HM$CH,N(H)):PRINT 
5030 FOR X=1 TO N(M)-1:IF X=11 THEN PRINT 
5040 PRINT TABC2 + (X>9));STR$(X);") ";MM$(M,x:i 
5050 NEXT X:PRINT:PRINT S$:GOSUB 8020 

5060 INPUT "CHOICE:";*: IF A<1 OR A>NCH)-1 THEN 5000 
5070 RETURN 

5999 REM —NOT SAVED SUBROUTINE— 

6000 POKE 214,15:PRINT 

6010 PRINT "YOU DID NOT CLOSE THE CURRENT ADDRESS" 
6020 PRINT "BOOK. ENTER <1> FOR ANOTHER CHANCE TO" 
6030 PRINT "SAVE, OR ENTER <2> TO ERASE THE" 
6040 PRINT "CURRENT ADDRESS BOOK: ";;RETURN 

6999 REM —ANY KEY SUBROUTINE— 

7000 PRINT:PRINT TAB(7);"PfiESS ANY KEY TO CONTINUE." 

7999 REM —INPUT SUBROUTINE— 

8000 GET Z$:IF ZS="" THEN 8000 

8010 Z=ASC(ZSJ:ZS=CHRSi:Z-32*CZ>96>*CZ<123)): RETURN 
8020 POKE 198,4:P0K£ 631,20:POKE 632,20 
8030 POKE 633,32 :P0KE 634,32:RETURN 

8999 REM —EDITOR SUBROUTINE— 

9000 T$="":TL=0:POKE 2U,R:PRINT 
9010 PRINT TABCC);L£FT$CUL$,L(X)) 
9020 POKE 214,R:PRINT:PRINT TABCO;T$; 
9030 IF TLOLCX) THEN PRINT CHR$(164); 
9040 POKE 214,R:PRINT:PRINT TAB(C+TL); 
9050 GET K$:IF KS="" THEN 9050 

9060 IF K$<>CHR$(13) THEN 9090 




9070 POKE 2U,R:PRINT 

9080 PRINT TABCC+TL);LEFT$(BL$,L(X)-TL+1):RETURN 

9090 IF K5OCHRSC20) THEN 9120 

9100 IF TL=0 THEN 9050 

9110 TL=TL-1:T$=L£FT$(T$,TL):G0T0 9020 

9120 IF K$<CHRSC32) OR K$>CHR$<90) THEN 9050 

9130 IF LENCT$)=LCX) THEN POKE 53280, 2:G0T0 9150 

9140 TS=T$+K$:TL=TL+1:G0T0 9020 

9150 FOR D=1 TO 50:NEXT 0:POKE 53280, 14;GOT0 9050 

9999 REH —PRINT SUBROUTINES— 

10000 PRINT "PRESS <Y> WHEN THE PRINTER IS READY OR" 
10010 PRINT "ANY OTHER KEY TO CANCEL PRINTING."; 
10020 RETURN 

11000 PfiINT#4,PB$(X,2);" ";Pfl$CX,1) 

11010 FOR Y=3 TO 10 

11020 IF P8$CX,YJ="" OR PB$(X,Y)=CHR$(32) THEN 11070 

11030 PRINT#4,PB$CX,Y); 

11040 IF Y=6 THEN PRINT#4,", "; :GOTO 11080 

11050 IF Y=7 THEN PfilNTi!/4," "; :G0TO 11080 

11060 PRINT#4:GOT0 110S0 

11070 IF Y=8 OR Y=9 THEN PRINT#4 

11080 NEXT Y:PRINT#4:RETURN 

11999 REM —LOCATION DATA— 

12000 DATA 5,4,15,5,24,15,6,4,26,7,4,26,8,4,26 
12010 DATA 9,4,15,9,24,2,9,32,5,10,4,26,11,4,26 

12999 REH —MENU DATA— 

13000 DATA 8,START A NEW ADDRESS BOOK 
13010 DATA ADD TO THIS ADDRESS BOOK 

13020 DATA BROWSE THROUGH THIS ADDRESS BOOK 

13030 DATA PRINT THIS ADDRESS BOOK 

13040 DATA REARRANGE THIS ADDRESS BOOK 

13050 DATA OPEN OR CLOSE AN ADDRESS BOOK, QUIT 

13060 DATA MICRO PHONEBOOK 

13070 DATA 6,SEE THE NAMES OF YOUR FILES 

13080 DATA OPEN AN ADDRESS BOOK 

13090 DATA CLOSE THE CURRENT ADDRESS BOOK, ERASE A FILE 

13100 DATA RETURN TO THE MAIN MENU, DO YOU WANT TO... 

13110 DATA 12, LAST NAME, FIRST NAME, COMPANY, ADDRESS #1 

13120 DATA ADDRESS #2, CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE, HOME NUMBER 

13130 DATA WORK NUMBER,RETURN TO MAIN MENU 

13140 DATA ARRANGE ACCORDING TO... 

IBM PC & compatibles w/128K RAM & disk drive 
(printer eptional)/Mlcre Phonebook 

Tltii, prtKtfarn has bc't'il Wstvci and found tu work (in Olfjtiltnn't'tg compiiwrs and 
hardware conjiquratlans using thcliASiCs stiown: iBM PC wCnJur/Craphic:^ 
Monllor Adapter or Monochmme'Pdnlcr card. wtDlsk liASIC D2.00 or AdDamrd 
BASICA2.00.IBMPCirw'CanrtdgeBASICJI.OO. Tandij 1000 uvGW BASIC 2.02 
L*(?rsi()n 01.01.00. h f^^ould also work on ;ncini/ PC compattiilca. 

10 DEF SEG=8H40:V=PEEKCSH10) AND 48:DEF SEG 

20 IF V=32 THEN WIDTH 40:VL=7 ELSE VL=13 

30 KEY 0FF:LOCATE ,,1,0,VL:T=205 

40 DIM COC10),L(10),MM$(3,12),N(3),PB$(120,11),ROn0) 

50 FOR X=1 TO 10:REAO R0CX),COCX),L(X) :NEXT X 

60 FOR X=1 TO 3:READ N(X):FOR Y=1 TO NCX) 

70 READ MM$CX,Y):NEXT Y:N£XT X 

80 BL$=STRIN6$(39,32):FL=0:F$="":NE=0:S$=STRING$C40,T) 

90 H=1:FA=0:ON ERROR GOTO 0: GOSUB 4000 

100 ON A GOTO 130,170,360,840,920,110,1160 

110 H=2:0N ERROR GOTO 2000:GOSUB 4000 

120 ON A GOTO 970,1010,1050,1090,90 

130 IF FL=0 THEN 170 

140 GOSUB 5000: INPUT "",Z 

150 ON Z GOTO 110,160:GOTO 140 

160 NE=0:F$="" 

170 GOSUB 3000:FL=1:IF NE=120 THEN 330 

180 PRINT "Press <Enter> at the end of each" 

190 PRINT "Line. To leave a line blank, just" 

200 PRINT "press <Enter>. Leave the Last Name" 

210 PRINT "Line blank when you have no more" 

220 PRINT "names to add.":PRINT:PRINT 

230 FOR X=1 TO 10:LOCATe 7+X,1:PRINT MM$(3,X) :NEXT X 

240 NE=NE+1:PB$(NE,11)="":F0R X=1 TO 10:LOCATE 7+X,14 

250 PRINT STRING$a(X),32):NEXT X 



:£^ 



72 FAMILY COMPUTINi; 



260 FOR X=1 TO 10:R=7+X:C=14:6OSUB 8000: PBS (NE,X)=T$ 

270 IF PBSCNE,1)="" THEN NE=NE-1 :X=10: F A=1 

2B0 NEXT X:PR1NT;1F FA=1 THEN 90 

290 FOR Y=1 TO LENCPBS(NE,1)) 

300 P=ASCtHID$(P8S(NE,1),Y,1)) 

310 PB$CNE,115=PB$(NE,11)+CHR$CP-32*CP>96)*(P<123)) 

320 NEXT Y:IF NE<120 THEN 240 

330 PRINT "You have reached the limit" 

340 PRINT "Save it to disk and start another." 

350 60SUB 6000: GOTO 90 

360 GOSUB 3000:SF=1:IF NEO0 THEN 390 

370 PRINT "There is no address book to browse" 

380 PRINT "through. ":GOSUB 6000:GOTO 90 

390 GOSUS 3000: FL=1: LOCATE 2,12 

400 PRINT "Micro Phonebook" 

410 COLOR 15:F0R X=1 TO 10:LOCATE ROCX) ,C0(X)-3 

420 PRINT fiIGHTSCSTRI(X-15,1);": ";:NEXT X 

430 COLOR 7:F0R X=1 TO 10:LOCATE R0(X),C0(X) 

440 PRINT LEFT$(BL$,L«));:LOCATE R0(X),C0(X) 

450 PRINT PB$(SF,X);:N£XT X:LOCATE 14,1 

460 PRINT "Choose from the following commands:" 

470 PRINT "<B>aek, <F>oryard, <0>elete, <S>earch," 

480 PRINT "<P>rint, <0-9> to change, or <E>xit." 

490 Z$="":LOCATE 17,1:PRINT BL$; 

500 LOCATE 17,1:PRINT "Command: "; :GOSUB 7000:PRINT ZS 

510 ON INSTR("BFDSPE",Z$) GOTO 550,570,590,680,810,90 

520 IF ZS<:"0" OR Z$>"9" THEN 490 

530 X=VALCZ$)+1:R=R0(X):C=C0(X):G0SUB 8000 

540 P8SCSF,X)=T$:G0T0 490 

550 IF SF=1 THEN SOUND 400,2:GOTO 490 

560 SF=SF-1:G0T0 430 

570 IF SF=NE THEN SOUND 400,2 :G0T0 490 

580 SF=SF+1:G0T0 430 

590 LOCATE 20,1;PRINT "Are you sure you want" 

600 PRINT "to delete this entry? "; 

610 GOSUB 7000: IF Z$<>"Y" AND Z$<>"N" THEN 610 

620 PRINT Z$:IF ZS="N" THEN 590 

630 IF SF=NE THEN NE=NE-1 : SF=NE:GOTO 660 

640 FL=1:F0R X=SF TO NE-1:F0R Y=1 TO 11 

650 PBSCX,Y)=PB$(X+1,Y):NEXT Y:NEXT X:NE=NE-1 

660 IF NE=0 THEN CLS: F$="":GOTO 370 

670 GOTO 390 

680 LOCATE 20,1:W=0:PRINT "What Last Name do you want 

690 INPUT "to find? ",SS$ 

700 WS="":FOR Y=1 TO LEN(SSS):P=ASC(HIDSCSSS,Y,1)) 

710 W$=WS+CHR$CP-32*(P>96)*(P<123)):NEXT Y 

720 FOR X=1 TO NE 

730 IF WS=LEFT$CP8S(X,11),LENCW$)) THEN W=X:X=NE 

740 NEXT X:IF W<>0 THEN SF=M:GOT0 390 

750 LOCATE 22,1 

760 PRINT "Sorry, I can't find the name ";SS$;"." 

770 PRINT "Do you want to try again? "; 

780 GOSUB 7000: IF Z$<>"Y" AND ZS<>"N" THEN 780 

790 PRINT ZS:IF Z$="N" THEN 390 

800 LOCATE 22,1:PR1NT BLS:PR1NT BLS:GOTO 680 

810 LOCATE 20,1: GOSUB 9000 

820 GOSUB 7000: PRINT Z$:IF Z$<>"Y" GOTO 390 

830 X=SF:GOSUB 9020:6OTO 390 

840 GOSUB 3000: IF NEO0 THEN 870 

850 PRINT "There is no address book to print." 

860 GOSUB 6000: GOTO 90 

870 CLS:GOSUB 9000 

880 GOSUB 7000:PRINT Z$:IF Z$<>"Y" THEN 90 

890 LPRINT TABC12);"Hicro Phonebook" :LPRINT 

900 FOR X=1 TO NE: GOSUB 9020: NEXT X 

910 GOSUB 600C:GOTO 90 

920 M=3: GOSUB 4000: IF A=11 THEN 90 

930 FL=1:F0R U=1 TO NE-1:F0R V=U+1 TO NE 

940 IF PBSCU,A)<=PB$CV,A) THEN 960 

950 FOR Y=1 TO 11:SWAP PBSCU,Y),PB$(V,Y) :NEXT Y 

960 NEXT V:NEXT U:A=FREt" "):GOTO 90 

970 INPUT "What drive are the files in tA or B) ";DR$ 

980 IF DR$="" THEN GOSUB 3000:FILES:PRINT:GOSUB 6000:G 

OTO 110 



-G: 



990 IF RIGHT$CDR$,1)<>":" THEN DR$=LEFTS(DR$,1 )+" :" 

1000 GOSUB 3000:FILES 0R$: PRINT :GOSUB 600«:GOTO 110 

1010 INPUT "Enter filename: ",FS:IF F$=:"" THEN 110 

1020 OPEN FS FOR INPUT AS #1 

1030 1NPUT#1,NE:F0R X=1 TO NE:FOR Y=1 TO 11 

1040 INPUT#1,PB$(X,Y):N£XT YjNEXT X: CLOSE 1:G0T0 90 

1050 INPUT "Enter filename: ",F$;IF F$="" THEN 110 

1060 FL=0:OPEN Fl FOR OUTPUT AS #1 

1070 WR1TE#1,NE:F0R X=1 TO NE:FOR Y=1 TO 11 

1080 WRITE#1,PB$CX,Y):N£XT Y:NEXT X;CLOSE 1:G0T0 90 

1090 INPUT "What file do you want to delete";FS 

1100 IF F$="" THEN 90 

1110 PRINT "Are you sure you want to delete ";F$;"?"; 

1120 GOSUB 7000:IF Z$<>"Y" AND Z$<>"N" THEN 1120 

1130 PRINT Z$:IF Z$="N" THEN 90 

1140 KILL FS:PRINT F$;" has been deleted." 

1150 GOSUB 6000: GOTO 90 

1160 IF FL=0 OR NE=0 THEN 1190 

1170 GOSUB 5000: INPUT "",Z 

1180 ON Z GOTO 110,1190:GOTO 1170 

1190 LOCATE ,,,VL+CVL=13),VL:CLS:KEY ON:END 

1999 REM —ERROR CHECKING ROUTINES— 

200© PRINT "1/0 error. Check disk and disk drive." 

2010 CLOSE 1:G0SUB 6000: RESUME 110 

2999 REM —CLEAR SCREEN SUBROUTINE— 

3000 CLS:IF F$="" THEN NF$="Unnamed" ELSE KF$=F$ 
3010 COLOR 15:L0CATE 25,1 

3020 PRINT "Address Book: ";NF$; 

3030 IF FL=1 THEN PRINT " (not saved)"; 

3040 COLOR 7:L0CATE 1,1:RETURN 

3999 REM —MENU SUBROUTINE— 

4000 GOSUB 3000:PRINT:PRINT S$ 
4010 TA=(40-LENCMM$(H,NCM)n)/2 
4020 PRINT TABCTA);HM$(M,NCM)):PRINT 
4030 FOR X=1 TO N<M)-1:IF X=11 THEN PRINT 
4040 PRINT TASC3+CX>9));STR$CX);") ";MMS(M,X) 
4050 NEXT X:PRINT:PRINT S$: INPUT "Choice: ",A 
4060 IF A<1 OR A>N(H)-1 THEN 4000 ELSE RETURN 

4999 REM —NOT SAVED SUBROUTINE— 

5000 LOCATE 16,1 

5010 PRINT "You did not close the current address" 
5020 PRINT "book. Enter <1> for another chance to" 
5030 PRINT "save, or enter <2> to erase the" 
5040 PRINT "current address book: ";:RETURN 

5999 REM —ANY KEY SUBROUTINE— 

6000 PRINTiPRINT TAB(7 );"Press any key to continue," 
6010 GOSUB 7000: RETURN 

6999 REM —INPUT SUBROUTINE— 

7000 Z$=INKEY$:IF ZS="" THEN 7000 

7010 Z=ASCCZ$):Z$=CHR$(Z-32*<Z>96)*(Z<1 23)): RETURN 

7999 REM --EDITOR SUBROUTINE— 

8000 T$="":TL=0: LOCATE R,C,1;PRINT STRING$CL(X),95) 
8010 LOCATE R,C:PRINT T$; 

8020 LOCATE R,C+TL 

8030 K$=INKEY$:IF K$="" THEN 8030 

8040 IF K$<>CHR$n3) THEN 8060 

8050 LOCATE R,C+TL,0:PRINT STRIN6$(L(X)-TL,32) : RETURN 

8060 IF KS<>CHR$(8) THEN 8090 

8070 IF TL=0 THEN SOUND 400,20: GOTO 8030 

8080 TL=TL-1:T$=LEFT$(TS,TL>:60T0 8010 

8090 IF K$<CHR$(32) OR LEN(K$)=2 OR LENCT$)=LCX) THEN 

SOUND 400,2: GOTO 8030 

8100 T$=TS+K$:TL=TL+1:G0TO 8010 

8999 REM —PRINT SUBROUTINES— 

9000 PRINT "Press <Y> when the printer is ready or" 
9010 PRINT "any other key to cancel printing."; :RETURN 
9020 LPRINT PB$(X,2);" ";PB$<X,1) 

9030 FOR Y=3 TO 10: IF PB$<X,Y)="" THEN 9080 

9040 LPRINT PB$CX,Y); 

9050 IF Y=6 THEN LPRINT ", ";:GQTO 9090 

9060 IF Y=7 THEN LPRINT " ";:eOTO 9090 

9070 LPRINT: GOTO 9090 

9080 IF Y=8 OR Y=9 THEN LPRINT 

9090 NEXT Y;LPRINT:RETURN ^- 



MAY 1987 73 




PRODUCTIVITY PROGRAM 



9999 REM - 
10M0 CATA 

^m^tl data 

10999 REM - 
11M0 DATA 
11810 DATA 
11020 DATA 
11^30 DATA 
11040 DATA 
11050 DATA 
11060 DATA 
11070 DATA 
11080 DATA 
11090 DATA 
11100 DATA 
11110 DATA 
11120 DATA 
11130 DATA 
11140 DATA 



■LOCATION DATA— 

5,4,15,5,24,15,6,4,26,7,4,26,8,4,26 

9,4,15,9,24,2,9,32,5,10,4,26,11,4,26 

-MENU DATA— 

8, Start a new address book 

Add to this address book 

Browse through this address book 

Print this address book 

Rearrange this address book 

Open or close an address book, Quit 

Micro Phonebook 

6, See the names of your files 

Open an address book 

Close the current address book, Erase a file 

Return to the main menu, Do you want to... 

12, Last Name,First Name, Company, Address #1 

Address #2, City, State, Zip Code, Home Number 

Work Number, Return to main menu 

Arrange according to... 



MODIFICATIONS FOR OTHER COMPUTERS 

Apple II series w/64K RAM, disk drive (printer 
optional), & ProDOS/Mfcro PfioneiiooJk 

Use Ihe Apple 11 version, except change lines 1060 and 

1070 to read as follows: 

1060 HOHE:IF DR$ = "" 

6000: GOTO 110 

1070 DRS = "CAT,"+DR$:PR1NT D$;DR$ 



THEN PRINT OS; "CAT" :PRINT:GOSUB 



Macintosh w/Mlcrosoft BASIC 2.0 or 2.1 (printer 
optionai)/iMfcro Phonebook 

Use the IBM PC version, with the following alterations: 

Delete lines 980-1000. Aiso, change lines 10-30. 410. 

430. 970, 1190, 3010, 3040. 8000. 8010, 8050. 10000. 

and 10010 to read as follows; 

10 CALL TEXTF0NT(4):CALL TEXTSIZE(9) 

20 CALL TEXTHODE(0):T=61 

30 WINDOW 1,"",C0,38)-(527,338) 

410 FOR X=1 TO 10;LOCATE ROCX J,C0CX)-3 

430 FOR X=1 TO 10:LOCATE RO(X),COCX> 

970 CLS:FILES:PRINT:GOSUB 6000:GOTO 110 

1190 CLSiEND 

3010 LOCATE 25,1 

3040 LOCATE 1,1:RETURN 

8000 T$="":TL=0 

8010 LOCATE R,C:PRINT T$;STRING$tLCX)-LENCT$),95); 

8050 PRINT STRING$(L(XJ-TL,32):RETURN 

10000 DATA 5,4,15,5,30,15,6,4,26,7,4,26,8,4,26 

10010 DATA 9,4,15,9,30,2,9,42,5,10,4,26,11,4,26 



COMPUTERS WE COVER 

We rt'f>ularly presetil Iwo or more programs in eacti issue for llic 
Apple II series; Atari 400/800. 600/800XL. & 130XE; Commo- 
dore 64 & 128 (in C 64 mode); IBM PC and compaHt)les: and 
Color Computer. However, occasionally we have to omit versions 
when a program reciuires capabiUlies that some of these com- 
puters lack. For example, many Microtones programs can only 
run on computers that have Ihree voices, which eliminates the 
Apple II series; IBM PC and compatibles (except the PCjr with 
Cartridge BASIC and the Tandy 1000); and Tandy Models III. 4. 
and Color Computer. 

In addition, we publish at least one program each issue for 
ihe Adam. Macintosh, Tandy Models 111/4. T1-99/4A. and VIC-20. 
in the future, we also hope to cover the Atari 520ST and the 
Amiga. This month, these programs can be found here in The 
Programmer and in Microtones (in the kpower section of family 
iCOMinrnNG] 



TIPS TO THE TYPIST 

SOME GENERAL RULES 

1. Read Instructions and program headings carefully. 

2. Don't let fatigue and boredom contribute to inaccu- 
racy. If you're new to programming, type in a longer 
program in easy stages. sA\'Eing each installment as you 
go- 

3. Assume that every character in a program listing 
must be copied accurately if a program is to work. 

4. Watch out for potential trouble spots. About 90 per- 
cent of all typing errors occur in data statements. 

5. Be aware that our program listings are printed 54 
characters wide. Thus, a single BASIC program -line"' 
(sometimes called a "logical line") may appear as several 
lines in our listing. If you are typing along and reach the 
right margin of the printed listing, don't press RETURN 
or ENTER before checking to see if the program "line" 
you're typing really ends there. 

6. To correct an error in a BASIC program line, type 
the line in again from the beginning, and press RETURN 
or ENTER to replace the old line. 

WHICH PROGRAM WILL RUN ON MY COMPUTER? 

• Apple programs run under Applesoft [not Integer) BA- 
SIC on the Apple II (with language card). II plus, lie, and 
lie. 

• IBM compatibility of BASIC programs is determined by 
both the hardware and the version of BASIC used. Our 
programs for IBM PC and compatibles are composed on 
IBM PCs and PCjrs, and are tested under most versions of 
BASIC available for these machines. Each "IBM PC and 
compatibles" program listing is suppletnented by a run- 
down of the machines and versions of BASIC under 
which the program is guaranteed to work. 

• TI programs not marked "w/TI Extended BASIC " 
should be run under standard (console) TI BASIC. 

DEBUGGING HINTS 

1. Write down any error messages you receive. 

2. Look up error messages in your manual, and check 
the indicated lines for simple mistakes. Also check relat- 
ed lines, such as the data statements corresponding to a 
READ routine. Correct all the problems you can lind. and 
SAVE a corrected copy of the program before tj-ping kun 
again. 

3. LIST the program in screen-size chunks (check your 
manual for instructions on how to list parts of a program) 
or get a printout. Compare what you've typed In — letter 
by letter — to the published program. Make sure that you 
haven't dropped or mi.xed up some punctuation, 
switched uppercase text for lowercase, or vice versa, or 
miscounted the characters (and/or spaces) between a pair 
of quotes. 

4. Mistakes in data statements are the single most com- 
mon cause of program failures. If you can't find your 
error in the lines the computer specifies, check your data 
statements line by line, letter by letter, comma by comma. 

5. If all else fails, turn off your computer and relax. 
Then try again the next day — exhausted proofreaders are 
careless proofreaders. 



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XMM801 Printer SI 99.90 

XM801 Modem S 37.90 

XC1 1 Data Cassette . . . S 37,90 
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Atari Touch Tablet $ 42.77 

800 XL Power Supply ..$ 29.77 



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01 571 Dist; Drive $239.90 

MPS 1000 Printer $249.90 

O1902 Monitor $288.00 

C1350 Mouse $ 37.90 

CI 660 300 Baud 

Modem $ 49.90 

C1670 1200 Baud 

Modem $148.90 

C64 Computer $139.90 

640 Computer S CALL 

520 ST Computer S399,90 

SF 314 Disk Drive S207.77 

SF 354 Disk Drive $149,77 

SCI 224 Monitor S297.77 

SCI 24 Monitor .,.$167.77 

SMe04Pnnter $199.77 

Atari 20MB $ 549.90 

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Video Basic S27.90 

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Okimatei20 ,-.. $224.77 

Epson LX80 .- $239.90 

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Epson FX 286 $479.90 

LX 80 wfTraclot $259.90 

FXB5 S379.90 

FX268 $504.90 



COMMODORE 
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MPS 803 Printer Si 09.90 

CI 600 300 Baud 

Modem $ 37.90 

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520 ST Cover $ 9.77 

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Clip Art I $18.90 

Clip Art II $22.00 

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Flight Simulator II $31.70 

Scenery Disks 1-6 $13.70 

Scenery Disks 7- 12 $13.70 

Scenery Disks 6 Pack . . . $69.70 

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COMMODORE 
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(Specials) 
Zork 1. 11, III $4.77 

Pocket Writer 64 $23.77 

Pocket Writer 128 $28.77 

Pocket Planner 64 $23.77 

Pocket Planner 1 28 $28.77 

Pocket Filer 64 $23.77 

Pocket Filer 12 $28.77 

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Summer Games II $23.90 

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Mulliplan $39,90 

World Karate Champ ,.,, S 1 7.90 
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Baseball $22.90 

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Eidolon $22.90 

Data Manager 1 28 $ 37.77 

Swiftcalc128 

w/Sideways S 37.77 

Wordwriler 1 28 

w/Spell Check $ 37.77 

Partner 128 ....$ 37.77 

All Four $149.90 

Dala Manager $ 27,77 

Word Writer $ 27,77 

Swift Calc $ 27.77 

AIIThree $139.77 



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DIRECT ACCESS 
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Organize your fiimily history using 
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Call today for free brochure. 
COMMSOFT ROOTS for YOU too! 



COMMDSOFT 

2257 Old Mrddlijdeld Way. Sle. C 

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(4151967-1900 



(800) 32-ROOTS 

inCA 
(800)53-ROOTS 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 9 



And your Earls and Viscounts. If you've got 
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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 27 



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The scrvKY ts. Irrc. all you have [q iJo ij aiTU pg^uge. 




Discover the secret personalities of friends, 
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$49.95 

Use the illustra led manual to answer easy mul liple- 
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detailed report. Amazingly insightful. 
Great for parlies, pei^onai relation- 
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IBM PC or Apple II 

Ciasa 

2017 Cedar St. 
Berkeley, CA 94709 
(415) 644-2771 




ADAM 

Ribbon Cart (Adam) 1/S5.bO - S3'15.00 

5'/r Disks (SS, OD) or{DS. DDI 25.S13.25 - 10S6 4D 

Dala Pai:k (Adam) - Original Beplaceiiiini Plain-Labeled Coleco 
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Micro Woriis ■ Integrated Home Bus System S25.95 

ENGLISH GRAMMAR BUILDER I ■ (Tutor) - OPiD S19 95 

HACKERS GUIDE TO ADAM - Volume II with Disii or DPS17.95 
VOCABULARY BUILDER I (Tutor) ■ DP/D S19.9S 

ALGEBRA I (Tulor) DP'D 519,95 

EBU- Replacement for SmartBasic, Plus MoiE-DP.'D 521,95 
Sign SHOP - DP - Custom Design & Print Signs etc. J20,95 
BACKUP I 3.0 DP'D - Copy & Utility in one $32 95 

PRINTER STAND SI 3 99 

AMIGA- -Atari- ST Series 
DIABLO-Graphic Mind-Cballenge Game S29,95 

DISK LIBHARV- File Catalog Search More S49 , 95 

DEALER iNQUiFIIES INVITED 
3V!" DISK (SS DD) 2S.'S37,50 ■ 10'S16,50 

3'/!" DtSK (DS DD| 25'S42.26 ■ 10/S17 95 

DISK HOLDER ■ 3 1 '2- up to 40 disks SI 1 .95 

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hjn^ IS a leg trademark of C^mnoilQif Coip Alsii is a fe} trajeirurk ol Atari Corp 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 19 



ADAM" 

HARD-TO-FIND ADAM SOFTWARE IN 
ORIGINAL FACTORY SEALED PACKAGES!!!! 

CP/M 2.2 & ASSEMBLER (Disk.OP) $35,00 

ADAMCalC (DP) 125,00 

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Smartf ILER (Disk.DP) 115,00 

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Smaft LEnERS & FORMS (DP) S10.00 

Recipe Filer (Disk.DP) S15.00 

Best of Broderbund (DP) CliopliftEr-AE $15.00 

Family Feud DP) $19.00 

Super ZAXXliN (DP) 110.00 

Super Donkey Kong (DP) S10.00 

Super Donkey Kong Jr (CIP) $10,00 

2010 Strategy (DP) $19.00 

Address Book Filer w/auto dialer $25.00 

Adam Direct Conned Modem w/sw S55.00 

ADAM HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE 

LORAN DATA PACKS $5.00.10/535 

ALPHA-ONE Data Packs 10/S19 

Printer Ribbons $5.50-3/$15 

Hackers Guide lo ADAM (OP) Vol I S17.95 

Hackers Guide lo ADAM Vol II S12.95 

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MultiWHITE-64 column v»Drd proi^ssor S36.00 

PaintMASTER-HI-ResolutiOft drawing & 

painting system, grapbic design $22. (XI 

SignSHOP-Print signs, poster, banners S22.00 

Extra Digital Data Drive $19.00 

64K Memory Expander $45.00 

PACKCOPy-Backup SmartBasic, etc $29.00 

COPYCART-i- Backup game cartridges $15.00 

PRINTER STAND-Front ON/OFF Switch $17.95 

Parallel Interface W/Cable.Software $69.00 

America At War-Educational software $10.00 

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World (jeography-Educational software $10.00 

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Fantasy Gamer (DP) $25.00 

Demons & Dragons (DP, D) Fantasy text adventure $25.00 

Lander (DP) Lunar Lander Pgm w/graphics $12.95 

Super Action Controllers w/Baseball Cartridge . . .£45.00 

Roller Controller w/Slilher Carfridge S29.00 

MicroWDRKS-Complete (ully integrated 
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spreadsheet, graphiiis, text editor $27.00 

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Send for mEE CATRUIG - EVffiYTHING FOR ADAH" 

ALPHA-ONE Ltd 

1671 East 16tti St., Suite 146 

Dept, FC87, Brooklyn, NY 11229 

(718) 33fi-7612 S/H $2.50 USA, $4.50 Canada 

WE WiLL NOT BE UNDERSOLD. WE WILL MEET OR 

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YOUR ORDER!! 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 4 



T.I. 99/4A 

OWNERS CALL 



1 -800-USA-994A I 



FREE CATALOGS & NEWSLETTERS 
OVER 1500 ACCESSORIES 



JOIN THE WORLD'S LARGEST 
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To become a member and receive newsletters, 

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package, send S10.00 for a ONE-Year 

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National Headquarters 
P.O, 60x290812 

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33329 

Attention Membership Division 

In Florida: 1-305-962-8846 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 1 



Know Thy PC 



Peeks 'n Pnkei a classic since 1932, shows you how 
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• Read number of drives (including types on AT 
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Not copy protected. No royalties in compiled pro- 
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Requires IBM or close compatible. In Georgia, add tax 
and call (404) 973-9272. MC/VISA OK. 

MicroHelp, Inc.. 1-800-922-3383 

2220 Carlyle Dr. • fi/larietta GA 30062 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 22 



Give Your Product or Service a Boost 
with CUssliled Expoaiue 

Cost-efTecllvely reach the more than t 
million FAHii.vcoMS'LTTlNC riradcrs who 
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writing programs, acquiring soft- 
ware, joining data bases, bulletin 
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Connect now by placlngVclassiricd ad 
for your product or service In familv 
cOMnrrJNC. 

CATEGORIES: 

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FOR FREf-yro SWAP 

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NOVELTIES 

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RATES: 

Erfeciive: January 1987 Issue 

Cost per line per Issue: 

In 1 Issue: $21.00 

In 3 consecutive issues: SIS. 00 

in 6 consecutive issues: SI 6.00 

In 12 consecutive Issues: S15.00 

3-llne minimum 

34 characters per line, tncliiding 

spaces and punctuation 

25 characters per line. Including 

spaces and punctuation, in all caps 

or boldface 

$17 additional for all/anv boldface 

25% additional for toned 

background 
•Announcements: 2 line minimum. 

SlS.OOper line 

Classified Display rates available 

upon request 

TO PLACE TOUR AD: 

• Print or lype your copy 

• Oelcrminc numtwr of lines 

• Decide frequency 

• Send to family counmnc 

730 Brondway 

New York. NY 10003 

Attn: Greg Rappoit 
Or call us at 12 1 2) 505-3587 and we 
will help you write an ad with real 
FAMILY pulling power. 
All P.O. BoxMall Order insertions 
must .submit PHONE NUMBER for our 
records. 

Ads received by the 20lh of the month 
will appear In the Issue approximately 
two months following receipt of the 
ad. 

Vi&a/MC Welcome 

Publisher rcsen'es the right to reject, 
edit or cancel any advertisement. Pub- 
lisher Is not liable for ads that are not 
published. 

VIDEO GAMES 

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Moffems: our BBS (414) 2655149. 24 His 

BOOKS/IWtAMUALS ~ 

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or computer. For info write to Jltn Ball 
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Full color. 165 page software cata- 
log S2. LSASE for brochure: Paradigm. 
Box6037fc. Mlddletown. NY 10940 



CLASSIFIED 



BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 

PERSO.N'AL CO.MPU'I'EH OWNERS 
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PUBLISH YOUR OWN NEWSLETTER 

Make S$S. Complete Report. Send 

S5.00 to: INFO MGMT. ASSOCIATES. 

P.O. Box 2893. Lacrosse. Wl 54602 



CAMPS 



1.2.4.6 Week Programs. Ages 8-18 Coed 
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NOI 



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PUbi KAiu VIDEOWARE FREE INFO 

I97?7W 1?M.*Ra Su.lt t BO D«cn FC Sojthlwid tti *607fi 

Computer Program Puts Titles 
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f OB f REI/TO SWAP 

•ATTENTION RS COCO OWNERS- 
FREE Color Computer Catalog!!! 
CoCoNuls. Bo,v 264. Howard Beach. NY 1 1414 

COMPUTER FACT BOOK 

Uam aboul COMPUTERS Ihc EASY Way 

For FREE Information write; 

COMPUTER a ARTS 

5580 La Jolla Blvd.. Suite 472-L. 

1^ Jolla. CA 92037 

FREE TI-99/4a & IBM-PC Software 

Specify Computer. For catalog send 

stamped envelope. Alpha Companv. 162 

Chapel Drive. Churchvllle. PA 18966 

HABPWABE ~ 

SINCLAIR QL / TIMEX 2068 

FREE CATALOG. MASTER CHARGEVISA 

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707 Highland St. Fulton. NY 13069 
(315I593-B219 

ADAM Discount Hardware ft Software. 
Send a self-addressed stamped enve- 
lope for our new FREE FLYER, to 
DATA BACKUP. Box 335, lona. ID 83427 



T.1. 99/4A OWNERS 
1-800-USA-994A 

Tech Help • Catatogs • 

Newsletters 

IN FIORIDA 1-305-962-«846 



ADAM compatible products 

64K expansion card S49.95 

parallel interface 859,95 

UNIVERSAL INTERFACE SYSTEMS 

Suite 133-20465 Douglas Cr. 
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C0MM0IX3RE CUSTOM CHIPS. For people 

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I^w Prices on ICs: 6510/6526-89.95. 

6S67-S 15. tS81-$ 1 2. PLA/saS lOO^ 14 & 

others. User group speclals.'quantity 

prices avail. C-64 Power Supply S29. 

"The Commodore Diagnostician" A 

chart for diagnosing bad IC's S6.95 

Kasara Mlcrosvstcms. Inc.. 33 Murray 

Hill Dr.. Spring Valley, NY 10977 
8O0-642-76.'i4 (outside NYl 9I4-356.3131 

64K EiqjandersS34,95, Ccnlronlcs 
Interface 829,95, Assembled HO Col 
Unit S233,0O SASE to Orphanware 
PO Has. 324 Canal Fultnn. OH 44614 

DISCOUNT SOFTWARE / HARDWARE 

Apple. Commodore. TL99. Atari. IBM-PC 
30% below retall.TI ext. -BASIC 649 
Slar NP 1 S 1 79. Panasonic 1 0801 S2 1 5 

Atari 1 0.W Disk Drive S 1 39. Atari 

1 30 XE Computer SI 29. Atari 1040 ST 

w/color monitor S850. Tl UTiter S29. 

Qvtr 500 soflu-are titles. Send S 1 

for eat. Specify computer 716-688- 

0469. MULTI VIBEO SERVICES BOX 246 

E. AMHERST. NY 14051 . Call after 6 PM 



ADAM HARDWARE KITS 

64K Expanders $34.95, Centronics 
Inicrlace S29.95. Assembled HO Col 
Unit S235,00 SASE to Orphanware 
PO Box 324 Canal Fulton. OH 44614 

ADAM 64K S45 US For orders or info 
Hard'Software-SPECTRUM ELECTRONICS 
14 Knightswood Cr, Brantford. ONT 
N3R 7E6 Vis;i/Amcx 519-753-4688 

MISCELLANEOUS 

T199/4A Owners: MlCROpendium is a 
monthly only for the TI Isincc 2/841. 
S17/yearorS2 for sample. Bx 1343. 

Round Rock. TX 78680 512-255-1512 

TS2068 Floppy Disk Interface and 
CPM and more. Acrco, Box 18093. 
Austin. TX 78760. (512) 451-5874. 



Ruining your disk envelopes'.'' Try 

the only ENVELOPES with WINDOWS! 

S4. 93/10 orSl/samplc. Clearvlew. 

Box 7542. Eugene. OR 97401 



DUST COVERS WITH S TEAR GUARANTEE 
Dtut covers of softlincd vinjl. 

NEW! Faclorv Direct Pricing 

Color: Blarh/BrowTi/Belge/raiiAVhltc 

AUAM 3 Piece Set SI 5. 16 

ADAM fJlsk Drive S 5.60 

IBM 2 Piece Set S10.97 

IBM PC JR. 2 Piece Set S 9.28 

COMMODORE 64 Or 154 1 Drive S 5.60 

APPLE II. lie. Or Drive 8 5.60 

APPLE HE. or Dual Drive S 6,.56 

If we don't have the cover you need 

we can make i( and guarantee it to 

fit. ADD S2 S/H: SASE for more info 

J-CHECK SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 345. Mlllry. AL 36558 

CK/MO/VISA/MC (205 ( 846-2360 

LASERWRITER PRINTING/MACINTOSH 

S0.75/page or Siaiir. plus S2 S/H. 
Fast. 171419680661. Chinghai Inc. 
9108 Helm. Fountain Vly. CA 92708 

FLOPPY CLOCK. Genuine 5'/i Inch 
computer diskette face. Free info. 
P. Sonna. 2458 Lomlta Blvd. #124. 
Lomlta. CA 907 1 7. 2 1 3-539-9577 

■•• COMPUTERyCOPT PAPER ••* 

9-1/2x11 ComputcrS18.50(C,S/2500) 
8-1/2x1 1 Copy $26.50 (CS/50001 

You win be billed for shipping. 

Add S2.50-COD orders- Send check or 

money order to: The Reiland Corp.. 

P.O. Box 1 173. Prince Frederick. MD 

20678. 1301 1 586-1625 MD add 5% Tax 



ADAM KEYBOARD OVERLAYS 
1 6 FOR S 1 ! : ASSORTED VENDOR PGMS 

ADAM IRON-ON T-SHIRT DECAL 
EACH S5: size 1 1x8: CARTOON ART 
J.B. 6634 SW41 ST. DAVIE. FL33314 

II vour computer is important to 

you. 'INSURE IT! SAFEWARE provides 

full replaceoieut of hardware, media 

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as S39 a year covers fire, theft. 

power surge, earthquake, water 

damage, auto accident and more. 

Call Monday-Saturday. 

SAFEWARE 

THE INSURANCE AGENCY INC 

2929 N. High Street.. PO Box 0221 1 

Columbus, OH 43202 

(8001848-3469 Nationwide 

16141 262-0559 Ohio 

SMALL BUSINESS 

Printed Forms 4 Your Home Business 

Send S2 for Full Color Catalog 
VBF. 1683 Cora, Des Plaliies. 11, 60018 

SOfTWABE ~ 

FUN EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE 

Over 80 low-cost original programs. 
IBM. C64. T199/4A.'Free briK-hure. 

KIDwire 
13H0 I56lh NE, iK-2. Bcllcvuc. WA 98007 

ADAM SOFTWARE for BUSINESS. Also Hm 

Fin.. reci[}e. educ-. gms. others too! 

VOICE SYNTHESIZER-. SASE for catalog. 

STEVE JACOBY. 19932 Carmania Lane 

Huntington Beach. CA 92646 

SAVE 38% on Softwireil! 

Davidson's Malh HIasler 

Retail $49.95 our price S30.97 

Free price list. Speeifv Apple. IHM. C 64. 

CREATIVE COUFUTER RESOURCES 

Box 728. Grand Haven. Ml 49417 

FREE PROGRAMS!! T193'Adam/all TRS80. 
Appl. IBMpc. C'dore. Tlitrx. Send stamps! 
Eini. Box 5222MY, San Diego, CA 92105 

T1-99/4A SoftwarcTiesI Selections 
"Free catalog" MICRO BIZ HAWAII 
P.O. Box I lOa Pearl C'ily. HI 96782 

S3 GETS YOU COOKING 

Diskette cookbook series IBM-PC 
25 cookbooks or create your own! 

Free ca(alog/dcmo disk S3, 
Vanilla Software. 3345F Lakeshore 
Oakland. CA 946 1 4 1 5-482.4756 

!!!!!! HELP !!!!!! 
Expand your child's knowledge with 

educational software from experts! 

150O titles from GroMer. Davidson. 
Scholastic, etc. Comprehensive cata- 
log: Apple. Com, IBM. We're S(x-clallst! 
S3.0O Visions-Educational Softtrarc 
P.O. Box 834. Southfleld. Ml 48037 

BIERRIAH-WEBSTER CONTESTS 

AUTO BINGO tor C6-V128. All Play- 
offs and Tiebreakers. #10 SASE to 
A-B. 5668 Chagrin. Mentor. OH 44060 

TI-99/4A SoftwaroHardwarc bargains. 

flard to Hud Items. Hujc selection. 

Fast sef\'lce. FR-e catalog. DYNENT 

Box 690. Illeksvlllc. NY 1 1801 

FREE APPLE SOFTWARE 

Over 1000 IHtblic Domtiln Programs on 

50 diskettes, 85 Each plus SI 

shipping per order. Send SI for 

catalog refundable with order. 

C & H ENTERPRISES 

Box 29243. Memphis. TN 38127 

PROGliAMS. IBM ft compallblc. 1-css 

than S4.00/disc. FREE CATALOG!!!! 

PSCa. Box 1057 C. Capltola. Ca 95010 

INSTANT UETTliKS ii'ilh INSTA-LETTER. 

Not a word processor. This easy-to- 
use progmm cantaiiis over 35 skeleton 
letters such as request, (haj^k you. coin- 
plaint and more. You jM-rsonallze it. For 
business or home. U.'ics APPLE II series 
with 80 col card ft prlnler. Rush S49.95 
to WordWeavers P.O. Box 6!7. Dept 1 13, 
Kent, Wa 98032 Wa, res add 8, 1 % lax. 
4-6 wks dellv 
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED! 



78 FAMILY COMPUTING 



Computerixed Record System 

Personal. KitianciaJ. Insurancf. llamc 

Invenlory. third Coplra. Expandable. 

Computerized Business Letters I 

Desifsnt'tl for small business lo 

comnuuiicatc with customers. 

VI/MC. E;t 849.9.^ + S4.9.5 s/h. 

Both no Itmii-IHM. CI'M. 80 Comp. 

InpufOutput Software Co, 
PO Box S72S48, WasUla. AK 996B7 

IBM PC a JR SOFTWARE CLUB 

Paradise Computer Works. 

RD 1 Btix 273 A. Newark Valley. M' 1 38 1 1 

C 64 AND IRM-PC SOFTWARE C(!EAt'!!l 

.Send for your caljilog of game. 

home mana/^cnient. business, ullllty 

and ethiraUonal .sollware available 

and you will also receive a disk 

utilitv projfram listing free along 

with details 'on how to make monej- 

al home with your personal computer. 

PACEWARE. INC Box 64-A 

Pompano Beach. FL 33074 

FREE SOFTWARE 

Since 1982 SDC has distributed 

quality I'ublic Donia In/Shareware 

software for the IllM PC for only a 

distribution charge. For free 

sample cataJociie. write SDC 

Dept. FC«7. :i707 Br.insiis. Georsfion-n 

TX 78628. MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

ALL CASIO CZ OWNERS: 

Coiiecilon of atiiazliig. pro sounds; 
hear wlial this incredible keyboard 

can really do! 40 Data Sheets. 

812.95. Maestro Music. Suite 2345F 

175 5th Ave.. NYC 10010 

IBM PUBLIC DOMAIN SOFTWARE 

Send for free list, We have ftatnesy 

DbascsAVrd f'rocs/Spprdhts/Gruphlcs 

and lots more. Only S3. 00 per disk. 

JDXT. PO iJox 1561. Corona, CA 91718 

CROSSED WORDS-COMPUIER CROSSWORD 
PUZZLE CAME FOR COMMODORE 64 AND 

APPLE II. CREATE AND SATC ON DISK 

CROSSWORD PUZZLES FOR OTHERS TO 

SOLVE. OR ATTEMPf TO .SOLVE THE 30 

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GUESSA LEITER. vS34. ffC TECHNOLCXIIES 

CORP/PO liOX 1032. W. NY. NJ 07093 

WEATHER WATCH 

Monitor, daily weather data; 

temps. ])ri;cip. hliinidity. etc. or 

energy usa^e. diet info. . . .your 

choice. Many colorful graphs of 

your data. Scarciies for yearly or 

all-time records. Print options. 

48-page manual. $27.50 + 2.50 P&H 

Requires IBM ["Cw/color. rCjrw/128K 

Send check. MO. PO. VISA. MC to 

Pinetucky Software. Kt. 1 Box 260. 

KirbyvlUe. Texas 75956 

Get vour free C-64/128 Software 

catalog PANTHE[< SOrrWAKIv 

2230-1 Sesame. Memphis Tt^ 38134 

NEW -I- 4 AMD C-128 SOFTWARE Games. 

educational, finance & stats. Write 
for info. CARDINAL SOFTWARE 14840 
Build Ainer, Dr.. Woodbridge. Va 22191 

US S5.00- . , INCLUDING DISK 
Over 2,900 -(■ software titles for 
Apple II. IBM-PC, Matilntush, Latest 
titles. Lots of hl-quallty manuals. 
Also hw.'acc. Specify your com- 
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catalog to: MICRO-WORLD. Dept FC, 
Towner PO Box 3 1 0. Si ngapore 9132 

TI-994A MOVE OVER MAX! 

i. YAK-MAN Talks! Savs Wtial You Want 

2. USA CAPITALS GAME. OnScreen Map 

3. BIBLE DOOKS 4. BIBLE TRIVIA 
COMMODORE-64 FAMILY FUNI 

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2- BIBLE BOOKS 3. BIBLE ANAGRAMS 

S14.95 each. 2 FOR S19.95 

YAK Needs Speech Svn. & TEil. Oilicrs 

Require No Extras! tUINITTt' SYSTEMS 

l022Gr!iiidvlew. PiilsburjJii PA 15237 



FREE SOFTWARE 

IBM. C-64. C-1 28 & CP/M computers 

send SASE for info (list computer); 

PUBLIC DOMAIN USERS GROUP 

Box 1442-FA. Orange Park. FL 32067 



5 '/I DS/TJD Diskettes made in the 
U.S.A. 37C each-minimum order 25 

Disks Incl. sleeves, labs & labels. 

Satisfaction guaranteed. 25 disks 

S9.25. NYS residents add .sales tax. 

I'lus S3. 75 s/h. Check or MO to: 

E.C.S. 3B0 5th Ave., Suite 574 F. 
NewYork, NY 10018. 212473-7192. 

ADAH & C-128 SOFTWARE 

SASE gets info, specify computer 

ADAMagic. 1634 N. Thompson DR. 

Bay Shore. NY 1 1 706 

TANDY 1000. Programs/Newsletter 

Send for Info. Soda Pop SW. 
PO Box 653, Kenosha. Wl 53141 

Topnolch Software for IBM Pc/Ms- 

Dos/Pcjr. Business, educational. 

games, and utility disks. Send for 

catalog to: Morning Star Industry, 

P,0, Box 3095, Ann Arbor, Mi. 48106 

D!SCOU^^T software for moat computers 

FREE CATALOG. Sale: 5.25' DSDD disks 

25«13.95 ppd. WMJ Data Systems-FC 

4 Bulterlly Dr.. Haupjiauge. NY 1 1788 



NEW GAME FOR Ai:)AM!!! 

Take on the role of a mouse stuck 

in a maze in LAB MOUSE: SIS DDIVSia 

DISK. Send SASE for catalog: REEDY 

SOfTWAKi; 10OH5 60th Sliret. Alto. Ml 49302 



IBM & Tr<S-80 Model 11 1/4/4 P/4D/CC 

Educational. Bio-Rhythms. & Games 

Free Catalog: Aladdin Software Co, 

1001 Colfax St, Danvlile. IL 61832 






ss WIN $s 

witr, ouf , Jt 

spoRFs -:MMr 

HandFCQppirig 'P<v*^'^^ 
SoitwQje 

iHOffOJGHBfiED K^fiNE^ ;:;;:.■ ; . . ■■ 
. ■ ' V ■;._: :.;: .' GREYHOUND" :• j ;"z: r ■ ; 

:.. ■'. e'-2' ■::-: ;4; ;■: p«ofooiBALL---r.:, 

lOD&jrg Sy^'erT' S35g5 Spec V cJ,U(/Iape Apd e 
il-(-c»? -"^tori, IBM PC COUi^/-i28 tl IRS-eO'fvVx: 
3/4 Mod 10O/2OO Caa Ada S2 post/hoddl 
UC/vlSA/CODs occepteo Fiee infcxfrolion 
SOnWARE EXCHANGE. So< 53S2F W BlOOmtela 
Ml aeOiS Oiae'i ■ 80a-5?7 gaji 



Great ADAM software. FKEE catalog. 

The original Flippy DDPs 1/82,95- 
VERIBACK copv/converl program or 
FASTRUN load/save pgm fast SI 4. 95 
Add 82.50 S&H. Practical Programs. 
P.O. Box 244. Kalamazoo, MI 49005 

SOFTWARE 6 HW FOR ADAMt! 

GET SUPPORT FOR ADAM FROM ONE 

OF THE LEADING ADAM PRODUCT 

SUPPLIERSI GREAT PRICES AMD 

EXCELLENT SOFTWAREI 

(804) 460-5227 

MARATHON COMPUTER PRESS 

P.O. BOX 6SS03. VA BEACH, VA 23455 

COMI'UTEKS IN EDUCATION 

The very best .software for IBM & 

Compatibles. S3.50idlsk. Buy 5 

gel I free. For info: CIE. Box 119 

Macaulay Rd. KD2. Kalonah NY 10536 



erf 



t Graphics 
Converter 
■ IVIili SIh>|i 

EXPAND YOUR GRAPHICS LIBRART! 

Easily convert Print Shop graphics 

to Print Master graphics or Mnt 

Master Graphics to Print Shop 

graphics. SI9.95 4 SBH 800-762-5645 

Cardinal Software, 14840. Build 

America Dr , Woodbridge. VA 22191 



US SB.-Including disk: Thousands of 

famous business, education, games 

programs for Apple ll/ile/llc and 

IBMTC details US S I .- To Reliant 

P.O. Box 336 10. Sheungwan. Hongkong. 

7 IBM-PC DEMO programs on OS dl.sk 

w/catalog S3, eheapware 4038 N. 
9th St.. St., Louis, MO 63147-3441 

TI-994a - Generate credits for 

home videos. Send SASE for info. 

Newcastle. 13424 N. 33rd PI. 

PhoenLx. AZ 85032 



CRIBBAGE - Sig.95 US 

Fabulous graphic simulation of this 

classic can! game for IBM-PC/PCjr 

or compatibles. Requires DOS 2. 

CCA graphics. I28K. Add S2 sh 

STOCKING STOPFER GAMES 601 W. 

Broadway. Suite 305. Vancouver, BC 

V5Z 4C2 or call 604-873-8481 

BIBLE STUDY GUIDE, C64, IBM. S5. 
Non-denominattonal- B. Armstrong, 
P.O. Box 12192, Norfolk, VA 23502 

Tandy 1000 SX/EX/ 1200/3000 HL 

Discount Software/Hardware 

Micro 1000 PO Box 1 192, Orange, TX, 

77631 14031886-3808 



T.1. 99/4A OWNERS 
1-800-USA-994A 

Tech Help •Catalogs* 

Newsletters 

IN FLORIDA 1-305-962-8846 



NO FRILLS SOFTWARE FOR IBM PCs 
ROADMAST - ear diagnostic $8.95 

viEwers to 100 caf problems Req: DOS 
2. NOAHS ARK- fun aicade gtme S7.95 
ciun fun Req: DOS 2 -f Color gnphici 

3R C«, 39 BowmiB U, Eliigi Pk NY 11754 

ATAlil 800KUXE unique homeibusincss' 

personal applications, artificial 

intelligence, entertainment software 

from 88.95! FREE 20-page CATALOG! 

Send 2 stamps: 25th Century, Box 

8042-F. Long Island, NY 1 1802 

RENT SOFTWARE FOR 064 k ST 

Lowest prices. No membership fee. 

lOO's of brand name programs. 

Specify €64/ 1 28 or Atari ST. 

Send S 1 . 00 for catalog to: 

Centsible Software 

P.O. Box 930 

St. Joseph. MI 49085 

(6161 982-0327 

FREE TANDY/IBM SOFTWARE public 

domain, B&J Enterprises Software. 

PO Box 485, Daleville, AL 36322 

FREE for Apple IPs, Tandy 1000. 

IBM-PC & XT and compatibles. Price 

list & description of Educational & 

Recreational Software. $7 to SI9.95 

This Is not I^ibllc Domali\ Software. 

Dealer/School inquires welcomed. Call 

817 277-291 1 or write to Blocher's 

Custom Software. 2201 Summer 

Place Drive, Arlington. TX 76014 

Atari ST public domain software 

20 disks to chwise. Send # 1 sase 

lakeside Enterprises 6638 40th Ave. 

Hudsonvillc. MI 49426 

ATARI 400/800/XE OWNERS 
Stock analysis & DBMS-Disk. 85 PP. 
LJD. 2895 e'. Brdgwater, SLC, UT, 84I2I 

CREATE BANNERS! Basic listing 83. 
Larry Cluff. 277 12 SW Grahams Fy.. 
Sherwood. OK 97140. Inquires SASE. 



SOFTWARE 

I Educational, games, sm. business 

20% 10 40% otf retail. 

Top Apple, IBM programs- 

I FREE shipping, specify computer 

SIh year o1 personalized ser/ice. 

FHEE brochure- Soft Source-R 

#D. 3451. Regan Rd. Joliet. II 60432 




FREE PUBLIC DOMAIN SOFTWARE FLYER! 
IBM & Compatibles - (MS-DOS I Save SS 

(11 $3.50 per disk! Write to: Al'-JP 
Inc. Box 1 155, W, Babylon. NY 1 1704 

FREE IBM ft APPLE SOFTWARE 

Public Domain. Over 200 Disks! 
Games, Bus.. Ed., Utiy. Free Catalog, 
send stamp/name/address to: P.O. CIuD 

P.O. Box 6877, Hwd., FL 33081 



APPLE PUBLIC DOMAIN SOFTWARE 

CAT. S2.00 OR 3.00 CAT. «t DEMO DISK 
FREE DISK WHEN YOU PLACE OKDER. 
B & L CONSULTANTS ft SALES. BOX 46 1 
WABASH. IN 46992 I2I9I 563-7650 VISA 
& M.C. IBM PUBLIC IXIMAIN SI.OO CAT. 



IBM PUBLIC DOMAIN SOFI"WARE 
S3. 00 per disk. Good quality DS/DD 
disk. Over 500 volumes, 24 HOUR 
DELIVERY. Send 2 stamps for list; 
Island Software, 150 Hamakua Dr., 
Suit e 339, Kallua HI 96734 

ADAM & APPLE SPECI/ILS: 50 to 70% OFF 
ADAMCalc, AOAMLink, ABAM LOGO. Dri\-es. 
ADAM TIPS S TRICKS (19 prog OOP) SIS 
M-DESK; File. Calf. Checkbk, Prlnl - S20 
CASHFLOW Home ■ Office Finance Pk S39 
.44 Stamps (or ADAM or Apple cat. 

NICKELODEON GRAPHICS 
5 640 W. BroitTi. Gicndale. AZ 85302 

C-64 FINEST PUBLIC DOMAIN reOGRAMS 

■On Disk- MOST SI .50 'On Disk" 

YOU pick the programs that YOU want 

For list ti description SEND SASE to: 

JLH. Dpi F B x 6702 1 , Topeka. KS 66667 

Outstanding Educational Software! 
Free CataIog-C64/Appie. Renaissance 
Software. Box 4882, Lancaster, CA 93539 



ADAM SOFTWARE ft HARDWARE 
RIBBONS 1/S5.G0 ;VS 14.50 B/S25.00 
BLANK DATA PACKS PRE-FORMATTED; 
EftTBRANO 1/S2,50 ia'S20 20.'S35 
E ft T FLIPPTOATA PACKS 1/83 I0«25 
LORAH BRAND 1/S3.50 WSSO 2D/S45 
SOFTPACK 1 chcckbook'mailiiig S18.95 
BUSINESS 1 mailing/inventory SI 9.95 
BACKUP 3.0 copy program. SI8.00 
TURBOLOAD last p^ra. loader 827.00 
MICRO WORKS Business Graphics, 
Data Bnsc, Picture editor. Spread- 
sheet. Text Editor 839,95 
MUL UWRIIE 64 col. WorrI P. S37.00 
SIGNSHOF banners, signs, dc. $22.00 
64K MEMORY EXPANDER S45.00 
RAHDISK uses the 64 at S29.95 
PRINTER INTERFACE wl cable S55.93 
SHIPPIHG - 82,50 U.S. $4.50 CANADA 

VISATJC, 22t STAMP TOR CMALOC TO; 

E ft T SOFTWARE P.O. BOX 821242 

DALLAS TI 75382-1242 (2141340-6913 

MENU SELLS SOFTWARE 

Thousands of programs for all 
computers can be ordered through 

MENU, plus you 11 earn 20% 

SoftCrcdlt. Order your guide today: 

APPLE n GUIDE (89-951, Spring 

IfACGUIDE ($4,951, COMMODORE or 

IBM (no charge). The purcli;i.se 

price of the guide Ls deducted from 

your first software order. Ma|or 

credit cards. Call I800ITHE-MENU or 

write to: MENU. 1520 S College Ave, 

Fort Collins, CO 80524 

APPLE PUBLIC DOMAIN SOFTWARE 

Sent! S2 for sample disk & calalog. 
Refundable with order. Disks ctKt $2.50 
CALOKE IND. Box 18477. Ri)lowii. MO 64133 



Iplus 




BE A LOTTO MILUONAIRE! 

New Lollo Pict:er Plus stores winniog Lotto & 
Pick 3 4 numbers S. uses probability outputs in 
ortier lo give you the wirning edge! All U.S. & 
Can. games included. Never Obsolele! 534.95 
I 4.55 s/h. ORDER NOW! 1-800-341-19511 
#77 Ssve s/h. order by mail: RIDBE. 170 
B'way. #201F NYC 10038. Inio.'Dealers 
718-317-1961, IBM, C61'128 versions. 



FREE IBM SOFTWARE 
40 Business & Education Programs 
For Info. Write: Quaker Enterprises 
lOOPrlscIllaDr.. Sewlckley. Pa 15143 

GAMES FOR IBM 

Oulstanding selection of arcade, 

adventure and educational games. 

Only S4/disk. Send large SASE for 

catalog. !>C Arcade, 276-F Morehouse 

"Rd., Easton, CT 00612 

Sqftwanr tonllnued on nrXt pcufc 



MAY 1987 79 



Rent DomalnyCommerclal-S2;5 Disk! 
Software iypc. Tandy. Sanyo, Amiga. KP 
CSW (8041 625-2089. Bx 808. LAFB. Va 236«5 

SOFTWARE rOR C-64 

300 (llll-s. Buy or RcnC 

Free Brochure MOORE 

407 Walmark, Ripley, MS 38663 

STASFLEBT 1 The Sparc straleRy hit 

for IBM PC Is now on APPLE II. CM 

and ATARLST FREE CATALOG 

INTEfiSTEL. PO 57825. WEBSTER T!C. 77598 
CALL or WRITE TODAY 1 7 1 3) 333-3909 

win SSS LOTTO DiSK SS3 win 

Lotto-piL'k-4 plck-3 numlxTS. Send 

SI9.95. PO Boji 25466. Hallo. MD 2I2I7 

IBMCompai. Lolsa winners 30 1-563- 1523 

LOTTERY— DAILY # ANALYZER! 

Best # picking assistant available 
Ifnot 100% sat. you get 5 JVC disks 
FREE ... NO gUESTIONS ASKED 
T199/IDM t conips. copyabk- $24.95 

SUNBURST SOFTWARE LTD. 
IX) Box 75, Brookhiiven, NY 11719 



TBLBCOMPUTIMG 

Unlimited VOICE/DATA Loilg-Dlstance 
ONLY SiOO A MONTH!!! Details SI 

Terrell Wholesale Systems 
P.O Box 1709. Corbin; KY 40701 

USERS' CBOUPS 

ONE THOUSAND MAGAZINE 
"Especially For Your Tandy 10001" 
monthly support foryourTandy lOOO 
persoiial computer Is here! Beginner's 
Luck. MS-DOS, Basic Listings, Edit- 
orials & reviews arc Just SOME of 
the topics covered on a monthly basis 
In One Thousand Magazine! We also 
have a software library available 
to all subscribers! 

AvHilable on nemtands everywhere 1 

Send to; 
One Thousand Magazine 

2153Muren Boulevard, Suite A 

Belleville, II. (5222 1-4 13(j 

(618) 277-3S26 



AMIGA USERS' GROUP 

Send $18 for Charter membership. 

Box 3761. Chenv Hill, NJ 08034 

1609 1667-2526 •VlSAWASTER-ADDSl 

PCjr LOVERS 11 1 
THE JUNIOR REPORT: 

Tlic National !ye\^?iJel(er for you! 

24 pilgcs nf artlrlcs. revteu's. Q & A 

& much, much mort. Accompanied by: 

PC WORLD Sept. 86, COMltJTE! Mar 87 

& USA TODAY Nov 6th. B6. Just 

$iavr/12 issues. Canada S24 lUSI 

The PCjr Club, Dept, F. POB 59067 

Sehaumburg. [L 60159-0067 



11. 99/4A OWNERS 
1-800-USA-994A 

Tecii Help •Catalogs* 

Newsletters 

tN FLORIDA 1-305-962-8846 



EVERT COMMODORE 84 FAMILY 

should belong to tills club- 

For free Info, send SASE tor 

DISK-OF-THE-MONTH CLUB 

Box 1919, Ocean Springs. MS 39564. 



Correspond with a user of your sy- 
slcm type. Exchange software , Ideas, 
& Info, For your Compu-pal send SI 
& sase to Com-cormect 407 Maple Ln. 
Mansfield, OH 44906. Specify system 



#1 ADAM USERS' GROUP 
Receive "SPRITE CHASER" newslet- 
ter. Advanced updating, evaluations 
on programs, hardware, technical In- 
formation direct from Coleco. Prob- 
lem-solvlng-program exchange- 
discount buying servlce-etc. 
Send S15 for charter membership to- 
#1 ADAM USERS' GROUP 
Box 3761 Attn: Jay Forman 
Cherry Hill, NJ 0H0;i4 
I60g)667-2526'V1SA*1ASTER-ADDS 1 



H^Bon Land 

QUALITY COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

Order HOTLINE 1-800-221-4892 

In PA or for information CALL (215) 524-9760 



5,50 

10.00 



S.50 
6.00 
6.00 



4.50 
9.00 



E.Dt) 
5.S0 
S.SO 



SPECIALS 

Cordata Portable or Oeshlop IBM Compatable Computers ONLY ^999.00 

Systems include 512K RAM. Hi-Res Moniior. Dual 3G0K Floppies, serial & parallel ports, IBW 
Graptlics. plus 4 expansion slots. Also included are Dos 2.11, GW Basic & Tutorial 
BONUS: Order now & receive Integrated Software which inclutles: Spreadsheet. Data Base, Word 
Processing & Communication Applications, 

MYLON nibbons Black Color Tianiler 

Printer Type EACH S* EACH 6» EACH 4* 

Anadex 6500/9500 7 JO 7,00 

'Apple Imagewriter, DMP, Prownter 4,50 4,00 

Apple Imagewriter 11 4.50 4,00 

Apple Scribe (Thermal) 5,00 4,50 

Brolher 1 109, 1009, Comm, MPS S03 5,50 5,00 

Canon A-40/50/55. 1060A/1088/115B 6,00 S.50 

Comm. MPSeOI.Comroji 220, Axiom GP550.GP700 5.00 4.50 

Commodore 1 525 5.00 4.50 

Epson APBO, Setkoslia SP1000 NEW 

Epson JX80 , , 4.50 4,00 

Epson MX, FX, RX ED/85, Citizen 10/20 4J0 4,00 

Epson MX, FX, HX 100/1B5, Citizen 15/25 6,00 S.50 

Epson LO 800 6,00 5,50 

Epson LO 1000 7,00 6,50 

Epson LX 80/90, Homewrltef 10 5.00 4JiO 

Epson LCi 1500 , 5.50 5.00 

IBM Proprintcr , 5,50 5,00 

Nee P2/P6 7.00 6,50 

Nee P3/P7 8.00 7.50 

'Okidata 32, B3, 92 i93/S1af SG 10 2J0 2.25 

Okidata t82. 192 * 193 6J0 6,00 

Okimate 20 (Thermal j S,O0 4.50 

Panasonic 1080, 1090, 1091 i JD92 7.00 630 

Smith Corona D 100/200, RS DMP 120 6.00 5.50 

Star NX 10 7.00 8i0 

Toshiba 1350. 1351, P1340, P351. 341 6,00 5.50 7,00 650 

Colors: Red, Yellow, Blue, Green, Brown, Purple, * Orange & Silver, 

Transfer Colors: Red, Yellow, Blue & Black, 

MULTI-STRIKE Black Film Rlbbont EACH 



13,00 
5,50 

7.00 

7.00 

E.OO 
6.50 



4,00 
7J0 
6.00 
6.00 
7.00 



12X10 
4.50 
6.50 
6.50 

5.50 
5.50 
6.00 



330 
7.00 
5.50 
T.SO 
6.50 



Apple LQP, Qume IV 5,00 



6+ 
4,50 
5.00 
3.00 
6.00 
3.50 
4.50 
4,50 
3.50 
5.50 



Brolher Hfl 15/35. Comrex II 5.50 

Diablo Hi-Type II 3.60 

Epson DX-10. Silver Reed 6.50 

JulO 610O, IBM Setectric II, Tech 111 4,00 

Nee 3500 5.00 

Nee 5500 5,00 

Qume Letlerpro 20 4.00 

'Spirit 80, BMC.8a, Legend 880, 808, 1080, 1380 6.00 

'Available in Red, Blue 4 Brown. (Add '1.00 Each! 
DISKS - 5 t/4- Verbatim Brand - 20 Pack 

SSDDorDSDD 69 Each 20 Pack of Ubels* Sleeves '2.20 

Madnker - Re-)nk Ribbons for about 5C 

Apple Imagewriter. DMP. Prowriter 41.95 

Epson MX, FX, HX 80,'65/100/185/286 49.95 

Universal Base plus Driver Kit for Most Nylon Ribbons 64.95 

Ink Kit (AvailabCe in Red, Yellow, Blue, Green, Brown, Purple & Black) 8.Q0 

While Compular Paper - Micro-Perl 250O Sheets 25.00 

Color Computer Paper - Red. Blue, Gold. Lt, Blue. Pink, Ivory, 'Canary & Qreen. 

1 00 Sheets '6.00 600 Sheets or Rainbow Pack '24.00 

'riol mciudsd m Rimbow PdC!(. 

Color Envelopes - Inviletion Size/Red, Blue. GoW, Ll. Blue & Pink. 

50 Envefopes '4.50 1 oo Envelopes '8.00 250 Envelopes '15.00 

PRINT HEAD CLEANINQ KITS - Helps prolong ribbon 6. print head llle. 

Apple Imagewriter I & 11. OMP, Proitfriter 8,00 

Epson MX, FX, RX 80/65, Cillzen 10/20 8,00 

Epson LX-80/90. Homewriler 10 8.00 

Okidata 82, 83. 92 133, Star SG 10 8.00 

Panasonic lOBO. 1O90. 1091. 1092 8.00 

CALL FOR PRICING ON ALL HARD TO FIND RIBBONS! 

SciionI i 0usinc33 Purchase Ordofs AccopTed PA roMdenla add 6S Sufofl Tin UC. Vita, COD ORDERS Accepiftd. 

HLbbon artJers o.or '50 are i^'pfyr^ irwi, UPS G'OUi.0 Only. All otTifrf ordara add '3 S 4 M. OPS Ground Only Pncaa subjact to 

cf^nge wilhoul noLcs 

Ribbon Und • P.O. Box 506 • Exlon • PA • 19341 



ADViRTISER INDEX 


MAY 




FAMILY COMPUTING 


Advertiser 


Page 


Index 


Ho. 


99.'4A 


77 


ACS 


25 


Aclivision 


7 


Alpha-One Ltd, 


77 


Amstrad 


26 


Bible Kesearch 


17 


Blue Lion 


17 


Borg Industries 


76 


C.CM.B. 


67 


ClASA 


77 


Conimsoft 


76 


CompuServe 


9. 11 


Compucrarts 


76 


Data D-^Tiamlcs 


55 


Data East 


21 


Eieetronic Arts 


56 


Epra 


23.1 


Hall.v Instltule 


55 


ITS 


51 


Intelligent Software 


19 


Intuit 


15 


Kraft Systems 


54 


Kvocera-Unison 


13 


MWRuth 


77 


Marymat; Induslrles 


76 


Mastcrmedla Supply 


76 


MIcroHelp 


77 


Midwest Computer Camp 


71 


NRI McGraw-Hill 


49 


Nlad 


76 


Penn Linden Company 


71 


Performing Arts Software 


54 


Precision Data Products 


77 


Pro-Tech-Tronlcs 


69 


Pro-Writer Services 


77 


Protecto Enterprlzes 


43-45 


Quinsept 


76 


Ribbonland 


SO 


Righlsoft 


6 


S&S Wholesalers 


75 


Silicon E.iq)ress 


47 


Spinnaker Software 


5. 10 


Subloglc 


2 


TandwRadIo Shack 


04 


Tene.x Computer Express 


76 


U.S. Air Force 


03 


Video Tecfinologies 


02 


Zephyr Services 


53 



80 FAMILY COMPUTING 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 34 



FAMILY 
COMPUTING 



Use this card for fast and convenient product information. 
Name _ . 



Address _ 

City State _ 

Parents: Please answer the following 
questions. 



1. Do you use a computer at home to: 

900 A. Operate your own business. 

901 B. Do office work brought home 

902 C. Work for a company from 

your home. 

903 D. None of the above. 


2. If A, B, or C, please indicate 
the brand. 

E. Apple (any) 

F. Commodore (anyl 

G. IBM (any) 
H. Tandy (any) 

1. Other IBM compatible 
J. Other brand 


3. Do you use o computer at work? 

K. Yes 
L. No 



4. If yes, please indicate the brand. 

M. Apple (any) 

N. Commodore (any) 

O. IBM (any) 

P. Tandv (any) 

Q. Other IBM* compatible 

R. Other brand 



May. 1987. Void after June 30, 1987. 



. Zip Code . 



Please 

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It 
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4 
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iM nt ni 

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PLEASE LIMIT 

YOUR SELECTIONS 

TO 10 ITEMS. 



FAMILY _ 
COMPUTING 

READER SERVICE 

Use tt>ia card for fast and convenient product information. 



Name . 



Address. 
City 



State. 



Parents: Please answer the following 

questions. 

1 . Do you use a computer at home to: 

900 A. Operateyour own business. 

901 B. Do office work brought home. 
90J C. Work for a company from 

your home. 
903 D. None of the above. 

2. If A, 6, or C, please indicate 
the brand. 

E. Apple (any) 

F Commodore (any) 

G. IBM (any) 

H. Tandv (any) 

I. Other IBM' compatible 

J. Other brand 

3. Do you use a computer at work? 

K. Yes 
L, No 

4. If yes, please indicate the brand. 

M. Apple (any) 

Commodore (anyl 

IBM (any) 

Tandy (any) 

Other IBM' compatible 

Other brand 



N. 
O. 

P. 



R. 



.Zip Code - 



Please 
I 1 t 

7 I 



dtde 

4 i 



11 H 

It » 



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III Hi 117 

III la m 

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IM IM 115 



IM 111 m 

IN 117 111 

111 111 114 

111 lit IM 

IM 119 IM 

IM 111 in 

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PLEASE LIMIT 

YOUR sajEcnof« 

TO 10 ITEMS. 



May. 1987. Void after June 30, 1987. 




*■ IT) 

*• X '— ' 
o 



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9 

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ap- 




Climb bigher, faster in tiie Air Force* 



As an Air Force officer your career will take 
off. You'll quickly get management experience that 
could take years to acquire in civilian industry. 

As an Air Force second lieutenant, you'll 
manage people, projects and offices; you'll be in 
charge, making decisions, shouldering the respon- 
sibility. You'll belong to an organization dedicated 
to achievement, innovation and high technology. 

And as an officer you'll have the satisfaction of 



knowing that your work makes a difference to 
the Air Force and to your country. 

Find out if you qualify. See vour Air Force 
recruiter or call toll-free 1-800-423-USAF (in 
California 1-800-232-USAF). Better yet, send 
your resume to HRS/RSAANE, Randolph 
AFB,TX 78150-5421. 

Aim High. Be an^ 
Air Force Officer. 



Next to your computer, 





nothing beats 
a Tandy printer 





IBM® PC compatible 

For the best value and selection in 
top-quality printers, shop your local 
Radio Shack Computer Center. 
We've got what you need, whatever 
your printing requirements. 

Versatile business 
printer 

The DMP 2200 (26-1279, $1695) 
provides dot-matrix printing at up to 
380 characters per second. Efficient, 
fast printing means no long delays 
for reports — and that saves your 
business money. Supports elongated, 
double-higii, bold, underline, super/ 
subscripts, italics, double strike and 
bit-image graphics. 



Customized type styles 

Use the Font Editing Packages 
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rivals a daisv wheel. In the draft 
mode, the DMP 2110 (26-2810, 
$1295) prints up to 240 charac- 
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graphics modes. 

Low-cost business printer 

The DMP 430 (26-1277, $699) 
features an 18-wire print head and 
allows a choice of micro, italic and 
double-high fonts, as well as bit- 
image graphics. Prints up to 180 
characters per second. 



Letter-quality daisy-wheel 
printers 

Gi\e \our corre.spondence, re- 
ports and memos that clean, crisp 
"electric-t^'pewriter look." The 
DWP 520 daisv-wheel printer 
(26-2800, $995) produces up to 500 
words per minute and supports 
bold-face, strike-through, double- 
underline, super and subscripts. 

And for letter- qualit\' printing un- 
der $400, the DWP 230 (26-2812, 
$399.95) is the clear choice. Prints 
up to 200 words per minute. 

Stop by \our loctd Radio Shack 
and see our complete selection of 
printers and accessories today. 



TANDY COMPUTERS: In Business ... for Business" 



Radio /haeK 



Prices apply at Radio Shack Computer Centers and participatmg stores and dealers. IBM.'Regislefed 
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